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Full text of "History of the ancient Ryedales, and their descendants in Normandy, Great Britain, Ireland, and America, from 860 to 1884"

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NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES 



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HISTORY 



OF THE 




ncient ifliyeclales 

SMS J 



AND THEIR DESCENDANTS IN 



NORMANDY, GREAT BRITAIN, IRELAND, AND AMERICA, 



From 86O to 1884. 



Comprising the Genealogy and Biography, for about 
One Thousand Years, of the Families of 



RlDDELL, RIDDLE, RIDLON, RIDLEY, 



La, 



FULLY ILLUSTRATED WITH ENGRAflNGS OF PORTRAITS, RESI- 
DENCES, MONUMENTS, CO A TS-OF-ARMS, AND AUTO- 
GRAPHS, ON STEEL, STONE, AND WOOD. 



» • • 



• • • 



BY G. T. RIDLON, 

Author of "Early Settlers of Harrison, Me.," "Burbank Geneai.ogJ',"*..' 
"Hamblins of Beech Hill." and other Biographical 
and Genealogical Works. 



• •• • 



» • . • • 



1 • • 



• . . . • 



• •• . 

• • » > 



"That the generation to come might know them, even the children which should be born; who should 
arise and declare them to their children." — Psahns 78 : 6. 



MANCHESTER, N. II. : 
PUBLISHED BY THE AUTHOR 

1884. 






VOX POPULI PR ESS : 
HUSE, GOODWIN &. CO., 

LOW ELL, MASS. 



. . : • 













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. . « 

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I 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



PORTRAITS. 

PAGE 

(i. T. Ridlon. (Author) Frontispiece 

James-Muxes Riddell 61 

Sir Walter-Buchanan Riddell, Bart 63 

Sir Thomas-Milles Riddell, Bart 63 

Gen. Henry P. A. Riddell 63 

Capt. Thomas A. Riddell-Carre 63 

Walter Riddell-Carre, Esq 63 

Rev. James Riddell, Sr 63 

Rev. James Riddell, Jr 63 

Rt. Rev. William Riddell 147 

James Riddle 158 

Gen. William P. Riddle 225 

Ma.t. Isaac Riddle 228 

Col. George W. Riddle 233 

John Q. Riddle . t 336 

Hon. A. G. Riddle 371 

Hon. George-Reed Riddle 371 

Hon. Haywood-Yancy Riddle 371 

Rev. Samuel-Hopkins Riddel 371 

Col. John Riddle 299 

Hon. Adam N. Riddle 305 

Rev. Finley B. Riddle 371 

Hamilton R. Riddle, m. d 371 

John-Robert Riddle, m. d • 371 

Rt. Rev. Nicholas Ridley, d. d 419 

Mark Ridley, m. d 424 

Rev. Gloster Ridley, d. d • 431 

Sir Matthew-White Ridley, Bart 437 

Samuel Ridlon 581 

Rev. Isaac Ridley 581 



VI 



LIST OF lI.I.LSTRATIO\s. 



Hon. Francis W. Ridlon 
Jonathan Ridley . 
Daniel M. Redlon, m. i». 
'Dr. Nathaniel Redlon . 
Rev. Nathaniel T. Ridlon 
Robert Ridlon 
Thomas Ridlon 
John F. Ridlon, m. d. . 
William Ridlon 



PLATES AND VIEWS 



Coats-of-Arms. (Eight sheets) 

Tin: Haining . 

Uiddell House 

Friar's Carse . 

Caa ers-Carre . 

Tiviothead Cottage 

Fenham Hall . 

Swinburn Castle . 

¥ ei.ton Park . 

Cheeseburn Grange 

Glen-Riddle Mills 

Riddle's Banks 

Old Riddle Mansion House 

wlllimoteswick castle 

Ridley Hall . 

LTnthank Hall 

M \ktyk's Memorial 

Heaton Hall . 

Parkend .... 

Hillside Farm 

Pinegrove Cottage 



581 
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581 
630 
632 
702 
724 



26 

68 

73 

82 

99 

110 

142 

144 

148 

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156 

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221 

404 

406 

408 

422 

434 

it: 

633 
675 






TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Readers' Directory .... 

List of Illustrations 

Table of Contents .... 

Introduction and Compendium 

History of Illustrations . 

Origin and Change of Surnames . 

Family Christian Names 

Heraldry ...... 

The Ancient Northmen, — Riddell Ancestry 
Riddells of Arduamurchan 
Riddells of Enfield .... 

Riddells of Roxburghshire, Scotland 
Riddells of Musilee, Scotland 
Riddells of Berwick-on-Tweed 
Riddells of Glen-Riddell, Scotland 
Riddells of Grange, Scotland 
Riddells of Granton, Scotland 
Riddells of Beesborough, Scotland 
Riddells of Camieston, Scotland . 
Riddells of Newhouse, Scotland . 
Riddalls of Ulster, Ireland 
Riddells of Bermuda, "West Indies 
Riddells of Lilliesleaf, Scotland . 
Another Family .... 

Riddells of Hawick, Scotland 
Riddells of Galashiels, Scotland . 
Riddells of Tiviotdale, Scotland . 
Riddells of Glenmuick, Scotland . 
Riddells of Old Meldrum, Scotland 
Riddells of Aberdeen, Scotland 
Riddells of Peterhead, Scotland . 



PAGE 

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v 

vii 

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VII 1 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Riddels of Cushnie, Scotland 

Riddells of Hermitage Castle, Scotland 

Riddells of Liddesdale, Scotland 

Riddells of Wanchope, Scotland 

Riddells of Jedburgh, Scotland 

Riddells of Selkirk, Scotland 

Riddells of Stirling, Scotland 

Riddells of Newcastle and Gateshead, England 

Riddells of Swinburn and Felton, England 

Riddells of Cheeseburn Grange, England 

Kiddles of Troughend, England . 

Riddles of Tweedmouth, England 

Riddells of Parkmount, Ireland 

Riddells of Ballinaraau, Ireland 

Riddells of Ray, Ireland 

Riddells of Glasslough, Ireland 

Riddells of Richhill, Ireland . 

Riddells of Strabane, Ireland 

Riddells of Newton-Stewart, Ireland 

Another Family .... 

Riddells of Castlefinn, Ireland 

Riddells of Ballyblack, Ireland 

Riddells of Denmamora, Ireland . 

Riddells of Ballyraeath, Ireland 

Riddells of Ballyraony, Ireland 

Riddells of Glanish, Ireland . 

Riddells of Cornasoo, Ireland 

Riddells of Annamacneal, Ireland 

Riddles of York County, Pennsylvania 

Riddells of Bedford, New Hampshire, No. 1 

Riddells of Bedford, New Hampshire, No. 2 

Riddells of Derryfield, New Hampshire 

Riddells of Coleraine, .Massachusetts, No. 1 

Riddells of Coleraine, .Massachusetts, No. 

Riddles of ( 'harlestown, Massachusetts 

Kiddles of Boston, Massachusetts . 

Riedells of Douglas, Massachusetts 

Riddells of Nantucket, Massachusetts 

Riddells of Mouson, Massachusetts 

Riddles of Alexander, New York . 

Riddells of Schenectady, New York 

Kiddles of Winchester County, New York 

Riddles of Rochdale, New York . 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



IX 



Riddel Is of Saratoga County, New York . 
Riddells of Somerset County, New Jersey . 

Riddells of Maryland 

Riddells of Cecil County, Maryland 
Riddells of Lycoming County, Pennsylvania 
Riddells of Washington County, Pennsylvania 
Riddells of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania 
Riddells of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania . 
Riddells of Mifflin County, Pennsylvania 
Riddles of Holmes County, Ohio . 
Riddles of Dayton, Ohio .... 

Riddles of Detroit, Michigan 

Riddles of Caledonia, Illinois 

Riddells of Brunswick County, Virginia 

Riddells of Laurel Hill, Virginia . 

Riddells of Pittsylvania County, Virginia . 

Another Family ...... 

Riddells of Goochland County, Virginia 
Riddells of Accomack County, Virginia 
Riddles of Virginia and Tennessee 
^ Riddells of Chatham County, North Carolina 
Riddles of Riddle's Ferry, North Carolina . 
Riddells of Orange County, Virginia . 
Ruddells of Roanoke County, Virgiuia 
Riddles of Union County, Kentucky 
Ruddles of Ruddle's Station, Kentucky 
Riddells of Pakenham, Cauada 
Riddells of St. John's, New Brunswick 
Riddles of Nova Scotia . 
Ridley Family of England 
Ridleys of Ridley Hall, England . 
Ridleys, Lords of Ridley, England 
Ridleys of Willimoteswick, England 
Ridleys of Parkend, England . 
Ridleys of Battersea England, No. 1 
Ridleys of Battersea, England, No. ! 
Ridleys of Walltown, England 
Ridleys of Alstonmoor, England . 
Ridleys of Gateshead, England 
Ridleys of Hexham, England . 
Ridleys of Mickley Farm, England 
Ridleys of Beckley, Sussex, England 
Ridleys of Bury St. Edmund's, England 



294 

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312 

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450 

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456 

458 

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465 

466 



TABLE OF CONTEXTS. 



Ridleys of Newark. England . 
Ridleys of Winkfleld, England 
Ridleys of Kimbolton, England 
Ridleys of Newark-on-Trent, England . 
Ridleys of Arthurstone, England . 
Ridley Land-owners in Great Britain . 
Ridleys of Southampton County. Virginia 
Ridleys of Warwick County, Georgia . 
Ridleys of Bnrk County, North Carolina 
Ridleys of Rutherford County. Tennessee 
Ridleys of Oxford, North Carolina 
Ridleys of Wilkinson County, Georgia 
Ridleys of Wake County, North Carolina 
Ridleys of Truro, Massachusetts 
Ridleys of New York City . 
Ridleys of Cayuga County, New York 
Ridleys of Duxbury, Vermont 
Ridlers of Eastcomb, England 
Ridlers of Boston, Massachusetts 
Rhuddlan and Ridlaud Families 
Ridlands of Sandsting, Shetland 
Ridlauds of Charlestowu, Massachusetts 
History of the Redlon and Ridlon Family 
Ridloii Family Portraits 
History of the Redlon Family 
Redlons of York, Maine 
Will of Magnus Redlon .... 
Inventory of Magnus Redlon's Estate . 
Inventory of John Redlon's Estate 
Waymarks in Experience 



471 
473 
473 
475 
478 
480 
482 
490 
4!»2 
493 
515 
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535 
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5C2 
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573 



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I 



INTRODUCTION AND COMPENDIUM. 



HISTORY OF THIS BOOK. 



My early years were spent in the home of my paternal grandparents, — a place 
where many members of our family connection resorted to discuss the history 
of the past, — and from listening attentively to the conversation that passed 
between those godly ancestors as they gathered around the ample hearthstone, 
I became, at an early age, deeply interested in everything pertaining to the 
history of my forefathers and their times. This interest increased with my 
years, and I determined that at some future day I would fully acquaint myself 
with the history of our family and its origin. 

My grandfather was truly a patriarch, for he lived contemporary with eight 
generations of his family. From his standpoint he could look backward and 
remember three generations of his predecessors ; looking downward he could see 
four generations of his descendants, and at the same time he himself was the 
connecting link of this chain between the first three and last four generations, 
making eight generations in all. This remarkable acquaintance with so many 
of his family, supplemented by the possession of a wonderfully retentive mem- 
ory, which remained unimpaired till he was more than ninety years of age, 
qualified this venerable man in a peculiar manner to impart information respect- 
ing the history and genealogy of his family connections. The elder members of 
our family seemed pleased to advert to all the traditions known to their ances- 
tors, and delighted to transmit them from father to son, always careful that 
nothing should be lost. When these discussions were going on I used to draw 
near my grandfather's knee and listen with the keenest relish to every word 
spoken, frequently asking questions about the relationship between the various 
cadets of our family mentioned in the conversation. 

During those early years I noticed that frequent allusion was made to " Old 
Uncle John" and "Old Uncle Abram" in a very emphatic way, — great stress 
always being laid upon the word " old." This served to excite my curiosity and 
rekindle the fires of interest, until, as a result of my inquisitiveness, I possessed 
a very good traditionary outline of the history of my own branch of the family. 
If I saw one of our surnames in a book or newspaper, it always awakened a 
new interest and inspired a zeal to investigate more fully the genealogy of all 
branches of our tribe. 

While spending a few days at my grandfather's home in 1868, and discovering 
the remarkable vividness of his memory, I availed myself of the opportunity to 
make copious notes respecting the branches and sub-branches of our own line 
of the family. I was especially careful to learn where all who had removed to 



INTRODUCTION AND COMPENDIUM. 



distant States, had settled as well as to gain a knowledge of the personal ap- 
pearance and habits of the heads of the early families. On returning to my own 
home I arranged and classified ray notes, — the first written basis of this book, 
— and instituted an extensive correspondence at once, directing my attention 
especially to the acquisition of genealogical information of the descendants 
of my own ancestor direct, having no object beyond an attempt to make 
out a tabular pedigree, to be framed and kept in my house. Failing to trace 
by correspondence several branches broken from the parent stock, I found it 
necessary to advertise freely in the newspapers in several States, hoping thereby 
to find the "lost Joseph." In answer to these published inquiries I received 
many communications from persons bearing our surname, whose families I could 
not then connect with my own. Letters of this class continued to accumulate 
as I extended the circle of my investigations, and I was soon aware that our 
clan had become so numerous that my original plan would be impracticable; 
hence, knowing by this time that there were in the United States several branches 
bearing our surname, that were descended from as many distinct ancestors, I 
abandoned my first plan and adopted one of a broader scope, namely, that of com- 
piling a genealogy of all the American families, the orthography of whose names 
seemed to point to a common derivation. Having fully matured my new plan, 
I multiplied my queries by correspondence, circulars, and advertisements in 
historical magazines and newspapers. My mind was now fully enlisted in the 
work of research, and I decided to "leave no stone unturned" under which 
there was the least hope of finding a link of our family chain that would add 
to the interest of my proposed "book of chronicles." 

Some families had early removed to the far west, others to Vermont and Mas- 
sachusetts, and a few to the eastern section of Maine. More than seventy years 
had elapsed since any communication had passed between the New England and 
western families, and their address, in consequence of change of names in new 
States, and removals, had been lost, and a long time passed before any infor- 
mation concerning our western friends could be obtained. At length, however, 
my advertisement reached them, and with the most inexpressible gladness they 
reported themselves. I shall always remember with emotions of pleasure the 
satisfaction I experienced when I read the first letter from a representative of 
the family in Ohio, whither they had emigrated in the year 1800. I made haste 
to acquaint my aged grandfather with the fact that several of his own cousins, 
with whom he spent many pleasant days in his childhood, were still living, and 
that they remembered him well. On hearing the intelligence the dear old man 
was overcome with emotion and wept for joy. The communications that followed 
were filled with touching reminiscences of the days when the several families 
were living neighbors in New England. 

During the years I was collecting the records of my own family connection, 
great confusion was occasioned in consequence of the local mingling of the 
families that were offshoots of different original stocks. Many descendants of 
my ancestor had moved to the eastern part of Maine, and were soon living 
alongside of families named Ridley, who had come from Cape Cod, Massachu- 
setts, a few years previously: and having assumed that all were originally 
from one ancestry, the Ridlon family soon changed their name to Ridley; this 
mutation of the surname, supplemented by the frequent correspondence of ages 
and Christian names between members of the two families, made it very difficult 
to properly classify their records. The same embarrassment attended my 
researches in the western and southern States. Many of my advertisements 
were copied from western to southern newspapers, and I soon found myself in 



INTRODUCTION AND COMPENDIUM. 



possession of numerous pedigrees from a prolific family in Virginia, Tennessee, 
and Georgia, of whom I previously had no knowledge ; these used the same 
surname as many of my own kindred, but were evidently descended from 
another stock. These southern families were wealthy, highly respectable, and 
well allied by marriage with many of the most eminent families in the southern 
States ; they were deeply interested in my undertaking, and were as anxious to 
have their genealogy incorporated into my book as I was to publish my own ; 
hence, to give general satisfaction, I again enlarged my plan, and encompassed 
within the circle of my inquiries the history and genealogy of every family in 
America known by our surname, not only in the United States, but in all the 
British North American Provinces. 

Thus my undertaking assumed broader proportions from time to time, as I 
prosecuted my work of gathering records from the several American branches 
of the connection, until I had canvassed the ground quite thoroughly. In com- 
paring my records in order to arrange them for composition, I was not willing 
to put the work to press without making a reasonable effort to learn how these 
numerous families, descended from ancestors widely removed from each other 
in their settlements in America, were related to each other in the old country ; 
to learn, if possible, whether or not they all sprung from one common stock, 
and where their progenitors lived. But the work appeared of too great a mag- 
nitude, and as turned my mental vision toward foreign lands, with an intense 
desire to trace the family line across the seas, insurmountable obstacles seemed 
to arise before me; but while contemplating the subject there was another 
favorable turn by the wheel of fortune, — a book fell into my hands, in which I 
found the name and address of one of the family in England. I immediately 
forwarded a letter to that gentleman, which resulted in the establishment of a 
correspondence with several representative heads of families in England and 
Scotland, which has been uninterruptedly continued ever since, hardly a week 
having passed for eight years, in which letters were not crossing the ocean, to 
and from this country. 

As data of a very interesting character reached me from Great Britain, I 
continued to amplify my plans and extend the limits of my search. My interest 
grew with every new accession to my historical materials. I saw that my work, 
if published as it then was, must present a fragmentary and disconnected 
appearance; there would be confusion, uncertainty, and dissatisfaction in the 
mind of every reader of such a book; and after much consideration and 
weighing of the probabilities of success, I set my mind toward the consumma- 
tion of a work so great, that, had I known its magnitude at the time, it 
would never have been undertaken by one of so limited means as I have been 
confined to during all the years of my investigation. But there was no limit 
to the range of my examination commenced at that time, short of a history of 
the family reaching back to the earliest ancestor of whom any account could 
be found, and covering the centuries during a period of a thousand years. I 
also enlarged the character of my inquiries, seeking to procure not only genea- 
logical but biographical materials for my work. My correspondence had made 
me aware that the family, from its earliest history, had been ornamented by 
many distinguished men: that representatives of the old sept had filled impor- 
tant civil and military stations, and hence it was desirable to preserve in a 
family memorial a comprehensive account of their lives and services. 

Anticipating discouragement from those who could not quite appreciate my 
ambition and family pride, and wishing to evade the taunts and appellations 
that are usually pronounced upon an enthusiastic antiquary, I kept my new 



I.VTJiODUCTIOX A.YD COMPEXDIUM. 



project to myself for a considerable time; but so many calls were made by 
members of our .family in America, for the results of my original venture, that 
a confession of my latest plans was my only apology for what seemed to 
others an unnecessary delay on my part. "At my first answer no man stood 
with' me." To my relatives and acquaintances my undertaking was "a castle 
in the air," my "head was turned," and my "whole time was being wasted." 
To a less determined mind the work would have seemed too much for one to 
accomplish, but being confident from my previous success that I should not 
fail, I asked my friends and correspondents to have patience, and, life being 
spared, I would produce what had been promised. But, as I had anticipated, 
many were unwilling to be identified with what appeared to be a "wild goose 
chase," and at my solicitations for aid would ask, "What will all your labor 
amount to?" "What will your book be good for if completed?" "How many 
years will it take to finish the work?" etc., etc. Having become better 
acquainted with the value of such a book than I was when my relatives "made 
light of it " and manifested so much indiffereuce and stupidity, I shall now set 
forth some of the valuable qualities found in a book of this class. 

To me the fact that no attempt had ever been made to preserve in perma- 
nent form our family history, seemed a sufficient inducement to justify me in 
making very reasonable effort to procure the materials necessary for such a 
book as would be of interest to the rising generation. Like all historians, I 
soon learned that traditionary information, when transmitted by aged people 
from generation to generation, becomes exaggerated and modified, and that if 
those who may bear our family name in years to come would possess anything 
like a correct knowledge of their progenitors, it must be handed down to 
them by some accurate and enduring medium. The advanced state of civil- 
ization seems to demand that every one, as he goes forth to mingle with his 
fellow-men and assume the responsibilities of his generation, shall become 
possessed of a fund of information sufficient to qualify him to converse intel- 
ligently and instructively with those into whose society he must be constantly 
thrown ; he should be acquainted with the constitution and history of his 
country, and the principles of government. If, then, the history of the origin, 
growth, and prosperity of nations be considered a subject worthy of study, 
why should it be thought unimportant to know something of the inner circle, 
of the parts and constituent elements that compose the nations and govern- 
ments of the world? Certainly it is a worthy motive to wish to know the his- 
tory of those family predecessors in whose veins flowed the same blood that 
now animates our own frames ; those ancestors who have cut away the forests 
to hew out homes for themselves and their children ; the fathers and mothers 
to whom we are indebted for the names we bear. But, strange as it may 
appear, there are hundreds of New England families that have no traditionary 
knowledge of their ancestors; they do not know whether they were derived 
from the Celts or Scandinavians ; they cannot tell the names of their grand- 
parents. There is no excuse for such ignorance and stupidity, nor is it to be 
commended as having any claims to respect. Such a state of indifference 
respecting family history may have been " winked at " in colonial times, when 
the advantages of education were so meagre that few learned to write, but it 
is now unnecessary and inexcusable. 

A well-arranged book of this class has value from several considerations, among 
them the following which must commend themselves to all intelligent readers : 
First, from the interest we are supposed to possess in the names we bear. Whose 
interest is not involved in the family name by which they are identified? If 



INTRODUCTION AND COMPENDIUM. 5 

a member of the family whose name we bear is honored, our own respect is 
gratified, and we instinctively feel our family pride rising within us; and, on 
the other hand, when one of our kindred becomes the subject of disgrace, 
we afterwards feel chagrined, and acknowledge our relationship with embarrass- 
ing feelings. That sentiment of pride in a family name by which a distin- 
guished and worthy ancestry was known, is both natural and commendable, 
and should be cherished as sacred. In a good family history the virtues of 
our ancestors and kinspeople are recorded, and in reading of these we are 
inspired to noble ambition in the emulation of their examples, and in trying to 
perpetuate in our families the characteristics for which our fathers were 
deservedly esteemed while living, and lamented when gone; indeed, all thoughtful 
persons feel inseparably identified with those who bear their names, and have an 
honest desire to preserve the prestige of those families as a patrimony for the 
rising generation. 

Such a history has value, secondly, because of the respect we have for our 
departed friends. Universal custom has caused all respectable families to feel 
it a moral obligation to erect some monument to mark the places where their 
dead are buried; it is a filial and sacred duty to thus preserve the names of 
our parents, to record their ages and the times in which they lived, in such 
enduring form. Such monuments' have a beneficial influence on the living, and 
are protected by the most stringent laws ; but a comprehensive family history 
is a monument more enduring than the sculptured marble, which is worn away 
by the "tooth of time"; a monument of little cost, upon which may be 
inscribed the names, ages, marriages, and deaths of our entire family connec- 
tion. Another valuable feature of such a work is the collection of portraits 
embraced within its pages, and hauded down to gratify the desire of the rising 
generation to mark the resemblance between the several branches of our tribe. 
In consequence of removals from State to State, local monuments erected by 
loving hands, are often far away from the friends who would gladly visit them 
to read again the epitaphs recorded there ; but a family memorial in book form 
may be carried with us and kept always ready for reference; this may be 
entailed in our families from generation to generation, until so long as there 
remains one to bear our name they may possess an authentic and chronologi- 
cal history, from the most remote period to the present time. 

A book of this character has value, thirdly, because it serves as a medium to 
satisfy the natural desire to be remembered when our work of life is finished. 
Few persons whose lives have been useful in this world are willing to be for- 
gotten ; and yet those in the more humble and obscure walks of life must resign 
themselves to the probability that in a few years at most, unless their names 
are recorded on the page of history, they will be lost to memory. There exists 
in every heart a fond desire to be remembered by kindred and friends, and when 
separated from them for a short time there is great pleasure experienced in 
hearing from them by letters, and in knowing — 

" They look for us their homes to share, 
And joyful greetings " wait us there." 

A good family memorial has value, fourthly, from its relation to local and gen- 
eral history, for which it preserves many valuable data of a character that would 
otherwise be irrecoverably lost. A work of this class contains descriptions of 
the lands and homes where our forefathers once lived, and toiled, and died; ex- 
tracts of wills, deeds, inventories, and journals are here preserved, thus handing 
forward to other generations a knowledge of original owners of lands, the 



6 INTRODUCTION AND COMPENDIUM. 

comparative value of real estate from time to time since the settlement of 
our country, the means used to procure a subsistence, the growth of the popu- 
lar institutions, and the advance of civilization. Such a history enables us to 
know of the difficulties encountered and the struggles passed through by the 
pioneers in securing permanent settlements and titles to their lands, since made 
productive, beautiful, and valuable by their persevering toils, and thus fostering 
a love for the unimpaired preservation and possession of the homesteads of our 
departed sires, as a patrimony worthy of our attachment and respect. 

In recording the history and genealogy of our own Immediate families, we 
necessarily incorporate into the fabric, in marriage records, names from other 
families, thus conserving the links belonging to other numerous genealogical 
chains, which would have been lost in the visionary traditions of fleeting gener- 
ations; by such means we form a repository to be consulted by antiquaries and 
historians who may follow us. We also preserve the original spelling of names 
of places and individuals, giving their derivation and marking the mutations that 
have occurred from generation to generation. Facsimiles of autographs en- 
graved for such a book show the comparative improvement in chirography ; dates 
of removals indicate the westward movement of the tide of civilization; bio- 
graphical notices illustrate the advancement in science and art, improvement in 
business facilities and educational advantages ; and the whole work embodies 
almost every element of history from a very remote date to the present, — val- 
uable for preservation and interesting to the general reader. 

Having given my reasons for undertaking the compilation of this work, the 
circumstances that served to enlarge its scope, and explained its value, I shall 
now comprehensively describe some of the means employed for gaining infor- 
mation and collecting the data now embodied in it; but in doing this, for want 
of space, I must pass unmentioned hundreds of measures, — legitimate enough, 
but original with me. — resorted to by me during my investigations. 

To many of my correspondents it will be unnecessary to say that I have 
been a very inquisitive man, — indeed every successful antiquary must possess 
this faculty of asking questions, which is acquired by great application and 
experience in historical research. One must not only be able to ask for 
what he wants in a concise way. but he must present his interrogations in a 
form that causes the one questioned to feel under an obligation to respond. To 
awaken an interest in my undertaking with those who were at first indifferent, 
and to stimulate them to action in the premises, has demanded tact and inge- 
nuity, and there are many so obstinate, and some so extremely discreet, that all 
the skill of correspondence has failed to draw them out. Experience soon 
taught me that I must not ask too much in my first communication ; a long 
list of questions, involving genealogical data relating to several generations, 
seemed too much to be undertaken, and the letter would be put aside; then 
the success of the effort to procure the records would depend upon the way in 
which the second letter of request was composed. In my initiatory inquiry I 
would usually state, — truthfully, of course, — that I had in my possession an 
account of some branches of this family, and that I could not properly arrange 
the records for composition without a statement respecting other families; then 
I would ask for the names of grandparents, parents, uncles, or as the case 
might be. Supposing this was all I wanted, my requests were, in most in- 
stances, granted. To save expense, — believing that every family ought to help 
bear the burden of my undertaking, — I did not enclose return postage in my 
first communication; bat, if I did not receive an immediate reply, I reminded 
the person previously addressed, of my wishes, enclosing a stamp, which almost 



INTRODUCTION AND COMPENDIUM. 7 

always brought to me the desired information. In case my first two letters 
were laid aside without reply, I have written my third with a tone of dis- 
appointment, expressed in language a little pointed. I would state that other 
families had rendered assistance most cheerfully and promptly, that nearly every 
one felt a deep interest in my work, and would sometimes close by saying "if 
these questions are not attended to for want of references I can furnish them 
at any moment." This succeeded, with few exceptions, and letters from those 
solicited were usually prefaced with an apology for not attending to my wishes 
sooner, followed by the statement of their willingness to do all in their power to 
aid me in my researches. Having opened the way, I must then press my claims ; 
after waiting a few days another communication would be forwarded, in which at- 
tention was called to some omission in my first, and after thanking my " valuable 
correspondent" for the interesting information contained in his letter, I would 
express the hope that the wanting records would be furnished without delay; 
this was, with few exceptions, successful. Being now possessed of the material 
relating to the early generations of this family, I would write out my caption 
and commence the composition and classification of the matter; meanwhile, those 
families with whom I had corresponded, having acquired new facts concerning 
their ancestry, which inspired a growing interest in my work, in spite of their 
first indifference, their family pride would cause them to discuss the tradi- 
tions handed down to them, which excited their curiosity to know how the 
family history was progressing. Taking advantage of their interest I was 
careful to mention incidentally, in my subsequent letter, some historical fact 
that was new to them, which always served to rekindle their interest and 
sharpen their desire for a more complete knowledge of their ancestral history. 
I would now write that I had commenced the composition of their department of 
my book, and had found that I could proceed no further without certain records 
of births, marriages, and deaths of the younger generation, — perhaps I omitted 
the maiden names of wives, — and would suggest that they could never feel 
any satisfaction in the history of that branch of the family if it appeared in 
a "disconnected and fragmentary condition," when other sections of my book 
would be so complete and interesting; that, as there were now so few de- 
ficiencies to be filled, I hoped they would do me the favor to provide the 
names and dates "by return mail." 

During the many years employed on my work, I have learned the expediency 
of adapting my style of correspondence to the characters and circumstances of 
those families from whom I desired assistance; indeed, it would have been ab- 
solutely impossible for me to bring together from thousands of individuals the 
large collection of records and historical materials found in this book without 
playing somewhat upon family pride and ambition ; by these means the otherwise 
inaccessible have freely imparted from their stores of genealogical information 
valuable contributions to my work. Begging pardon for auy seeming dis- 
courtesy in my methods of investigation, I will state that to me, in my enthu- 
siasm, the end justified the means, and the results now given to the families 
who have endured my importunity, are of such a valuable character as to mod- 
ify their impatience and cause them to regard the author's work with feelings 
of appreciation. 

If I was aware that families from whom I wished to obtain information were 
in affluent circumstances, — if they were pressed with business cares and the 
entertainment of friends, — I have called their attention to my undertaking in 
a circuitous way, never failing to mention the many very respectable families 
of our name in Great Britain. I have shown that representatives of the family 



I\T1;ODU<TIOX AND COMPENDIUM. 



had been magnates in every generation ; that their original coat-of-arms was 
granted them for their distinguished prowess and achievements in battle among 
the Normans; that the "three piles in point" in their escutcheon represent the 
three nails of our Saviour's cross, and proved in the language of heraldry that 
early cadets of the family from Normandy had been engaged in the Crusade 
wars in the Holy Land. 

In my communications to individuals supposed to be possessed of something 
like political aspiration, I have called their attention to the fact that many mem- 
bers of our clan had won distinction in the halls of the English parliament and 
of the American congress; also, that by two or more alliances with the royal 
family of England, the blood of our ancestors was fused with that of every mon- 
arch that had sat upon the throne since King John. This intelligence was enough 
to start the "blue blood" in almost any man's veins, and has opened the way 
for my success in correspondence when, with some families, everything else 
would have been unavailing. 

Families known to be of religious tendencies and identified with church-work, 
have been advised of the fact that for eminence in piety the ancestors of our 
tribe were well known ; that in their loyalty to the cause of their Lord they had 
endured every indignity, even to banishment, imprisonment, and martyrdom; and 
that besides three bishops in the family, there have been about one hundred 
ministers who bore our surname. 

AVhen the person addressed had seen service in the army, and was possessed 
of a military and chivalrous spirit, I have informed him of the valor of our 
ancestors, — who had received the honor of knighthood at the hands of their 
sovereigns, and were made the recipients of many medals for services performed 
upon the field of battle ; how, from the earliest history of our family, it had beeu 
represented by its members in every war in which their countrymen had been 
engaged, and in every case had won distinction and the commendations of their 
superiors. 

If the methods of procedure mentioned in the foregoing pages have failed to 
awaken sufficient interest in those to whom I applied for data to enlist their at- 
tention, I have forwarded advance-sheets, copies of portraits, views of ancient 
family residences, and photographs. The possession of such mementoes has 
usually caused those to whom the3 r were presented to feel under some obligation, 
and many have afterwards proved my most valuable helpers. But the mediums 
employed which I have already uoticed do not involve all the embarrassments 
with which this work has been attended ; indeed, I have considered it good for- 
tune when these simple expedients have been successful. In many instances I 
have encountered such indifference and stolidity that for a time I was disheart- 
ened, and waited for victory in other directions to rekindle my hope. Some 
have absolutely refused to render aid, and would not allow the records of their 
families to be published in this book, and this statement must be my only apol- 
ogy for the disconnected appearance of many pedigrees, and the meagre accounts 
of some branches of the family as found in this genealogy. 

In many instances 1 have employed clergymen, postmasters, town-clerks, and 
lawyers to copy tombstones, family records, church registers, town books, pro- 
bate records, etc., and in a few cases these gentlemen have interviewed the 
families in person, to elicit facts respecting their history. These services have 
frequently proved expensive, and have only been called into requisition when all 
other means have failed. 

I have depended largely upon church and town records for the births, mar- 
riages, and deaths of the early generations, especially in tracing the American 



INTRODUCTION AND C03IPENDIUM. 9 

branches of the family. For names and places of residence I have consulted 
the probate records and registers of deeds found in our county houses. Such 
records have been examined by me personally in several States, and the expense 
of traveling, to say nothing of my time, has been considerable, having made 
two tours through the middle, western, and southern States, besides canvassing 
New England very carefully. I have spent days upon my knees, in the heat of 
summer and cold of winter, cutting away the moss from old tombstones, that I 
might copy the inscriptions which had become nearly obliterated by the wear of 
time. Months have been spent in the dusky archives of our public libraries in 
many New England cities, and I have caused to be examined the records at 
Washington covering the whole period of American history. Nearly every county 
in the southern States has been canvassed by letters and printed circulars. 

Another prolific medium through which much information has reached me, 
was advertising in local newspapers and historical magazines, both in this 
country and Europe. Some of these "queries" have been duplicated through 
the papers in several counties, and have, in many instances, brought me into 
communication with valuable correspondents and sources of historical data, 
that otherwise could not have been reached by me; indeed, by this means 
many branch families have been found, and ancient portraits, views of resi- 
dences, and coats-of-arms brought to light and placed in my bands. In 
many papers and magazines, I have published articles of considerable length 
on our family history, which have reached distant kinspeople, awakening in 
their minds sufficient interest to prompt them to assist me in my investiga- 
tions. In addition to these printed communications, I have circulated among 
the members of the family about three thousand blanks with printed headings, 
thcee thousand descriptive circulars, and two thousand copies of a prospectus 
issued in 1876. Many of these were filled out with records and returned to me, 
but several hundred were never heard from. Besides the expense of printing, 
advertising, and postage, considerable money has been expended for copies of 
engraved portraits, and views of foreign family seats, which have been forwarded 
to inspire an interest where all other expedients have proved a failure. 

To acquaint myself with the customs of those nations among whom our 
families have figured during the centuries of their existence, it has been neces- 
sary for me to read extensively. An American author writes at great disad- 
vantage in consequence of his being so far removed from sources of information 
that are in other countries, and in being unfamiliar with the systems of gov- 
ernment, habits of the people, and the terms used in their literature, especially 
when his work reaches back to so remote a date as does this book. Having 
commenced with the best histories of the Scandinavian races, I traced the 
customs and character of those people downward through their migrations, 
conquests, settlements in other European countries, and establishment in Nor- 
mandy in France, where we find the first mention of our family under a dis- 
tinctive surname. Thence my reading traced them through their wanderings 
into Germany, Italy, Russia, Iceland, Scotland, England, and the islands of 
the seas. It was necessary to learn of the arts of war employed in mediaeval 
and feudal times, to acquaint myself with the ancient system of heraldry, 
names and grades of rank in civil and military official stations, the holding 
and entail of landed estates, and to acquire a correct knowledge of the tech- 
nical language used in the literature contemporary with those generations 
whose history I wished to record. Having been so long resident in Scotland, 
multiplying and forming distinct branches, settled in widely separated localities, 
always advancing with the enlightenment and progress of the nation, changing 



If) INTRODUCTION AND COMPENDIUM. 

with the changes in government, education, and modes of living, acquiring ex- 
tensive landed possessions, making improvements in agriculture with the 
increased facilities introduced, modernizing their family residences to keep pace 
with the beauties of architecture of every decade, these many generations have 
figured more or less in the history of the country, from the time when they 
first sat down there till the present. Hence, the American author who would 
make any claim to accuracy in statement, is compelled to wade through hun- 
dreds of volumes of ancient and modern local history, in order to qualify 
himself for his work. These books are rare in this country, and as many of 
them cannot be found in our public libraries, I have found it necessary to pur- 
chase expensive genealogical and historical volumes in Europe; others that 
were out of print have been consulted, and extracts relating to our family 
copied for my use. To be correct in my descriptions of places where the 
family have been seated in Scotland and England, I have consulted gazetteers 
and descriptive maps, many of which have been forwarded to me by friends in 
those countries. My acknowledgments are due to many of my correspondents 
in Great Britain for the disinterestedness manifested by them in their re- 
searches in my behalf, being in no way connected with the family. These have 
seen my notices and queries in the papers and magazines, and being near the 
sources of information, they have kindly examined many ancient books, records, 
and other documents, from which some have forwarded copious notes appro- 
priate for this book. Gentlemen in official positions which impose many press- 
ing duties, have found the time to render assistanee that could not have been 
available otherwise. The laws of England and Scotland were early applied to 
the preservation of the records of the old families, and hence the sources 
there are much more prolific than in this country. Records have been well 
kept in parishes, and where now extant are almost always within the reach 
of searchers. Those great repositories of antiquated documents and records 
of families, the College of Arms and the British Museum in London, and the 
Register Office and Lyon Office in Edinburgh, have been thoroughly searched 
for me, and every item coming within the scope of my book culled out and- 
copied. But when the services of solicitors and officials are called into re- 
quisition, the expense attending the work of examination and writing of ex- 
tracts is too heavy for a poor man. 

My correspondence has extended to many gentlemen of high rank, members 
of parliament, ministers in foreign ports, congressmen, eminent judges, authors, 
bishops, clergymen, presidents of colleges, earls, lords, barons, mayors of 
cities, governors, State secretaries; indeed all classes, from the peasant in pov- 
erty to the millionaire, have been identified with this book by furnishing me 
such materials as were accessible to them. The record offices and historical 
libraries have been examined in London, Liverpool, Bristol, Manchester, and 
Newcastle, in England; Edinburgh, Glasgow, Aberdeen, Galashiels, Hawick, 
Kelso, Selkirk, and Paisley, in Scotland; Cork, Dublin, Limerick, Belfast, Cole- 
raine, Londonderry, and many small towns, in Ireland. I have also caused the 
records in Australia, St. Christopher, Barbadoes, Bermuda, Cuba, Isle of Wight. 
Shetland, Orkney, and Man, to be searched for my work. A correspondence 
was also carried on for some time with gentlemen in various provinces in 
France and Germany, but the labor of translating was so great it was discon- 
tinued. Parish registers by the hundred have been consulted in Great Britain, 
and some of them covering a period of more than three hundred years, being 
without an index and written on vellum, were carefully turned leaf by leaf 
for me. Scores of ancient church-yards in EDgland and Scotland have been 



INTRODUCTION AND COMPENDIUM. 11 

visited in my behalf, and many very interesting epitaphs copied. This class of 
work was usually undertaken for me by rectors of the churches or the parish 
clerks. To some I have paid a stipulated fee; others have kindly forwarded 
the results of their search gratuitously. In several instances, church histo- 
rians, being acquainted with the records, have drawn elaborate tabular pedi- 
grees in " broadside " for me, filling in names and dates, with chronological 
classification. 

From members of the English and Scottish branches of the family I learned 
that many of their kindred had settled in the British American Provinces, and I 
pushed my inquiries into every considerable city and town in those dominions, 
but for some reason unknown, some Canadian families have not responded to 
my wishes, and consequently the genealogy of those branches will be found 
very incomplete. 

As the records of different families were received, the envelopes containing 
them were all numbered, and an epitome of their contents written on the out- 
side ; then these were all classified, tied in bundles, and packed away. In 1873, 
the work of composition was commenced, and for sixty days, duriug which 
I attended to all my professional duties (being a settled pastor), I employed 
all my spare time in writing, frequently at my work till past midnight, and 
perhaps the most discouraging feature of that task was the fact that more 
than one-half of the manuscripts was re-written, in consequence of my dis- 
satisfaction with the arrangement of names and the classification ; this change 
necessitated the loss of more than one thousand pages of carefully written 
foolscap copy, besides hundreds of pages that have since been cut out to make 
room for addenda, and re-composed. No more confusing piece of classification 
and composition was ever undertaken than that of compiling from thousands 
of letters, copies of wills, deeds, commissions, account-books, ancient Latin 
inscriptions, copies of grave-stones, family Bibles, old framed tablets, marriage 
and baptism certificates, petitions, busiuess charters, bills of sale, notes, 
receipts, memorandums, diaries, muster rolls, subscription papers, and other 
papers too numerous to mention here. This will be better appreciated when it 
is known that the matter comprising some pages in this book has been taken 
from twenty different sources. These circumstances expose a work of this 
class to many liabilities to errors in dates and the spelling of proper names; 
these will, no doubt, be discovered after the book is in print and when too 
late to correct them. Of course, many of the original letters and old doc- 
uments were nearly illegible and difficult to read; these have been transcribed 
as carefully as possible, and when discrepancies appeared I have adopted that 
rendering which seemed most reliable; where documentary evidence was want- 
ing, statements have been made as probabilities and approximates. Traditions 
have been given as historically true only when well authenticated by according 
testimony. Errors caused by the carelessness of those who furnished me rec- 
ords, I am in no way responsible for; some are, no doubt, the result of over- 
sight upon my own part. 

It has been my purpose to incorporate a generous biographical element into 
this book, but it has been impossible to obtain sufficient interesting materials 
of that class to give the composition anything like uniformity in appearance. 
The biographical sketches of members of the Scottish and English families were 
largely taken from local papers and popular magazines, but some of them have 
passed through the hands of the family and received their approval ; many of the 
sketches in the American families have been written or revised by the relatives, 
and were endorsed as substantially correct. 



12 INTRODUCTION AND COMPENDIUM. 

The author does not claim to have compiled a full history or complete 
genealogy of all branches or sub-branches of those families whose names are 
found in this book: such a work was never accomplished by the most enthusi- 
astic and successful genealogist, and can never be expected. I have sought 
diligently and continuously for fourteen years for everything that could in 
any way add to the interest and value of this book, and do not know how I 
could have done more under existing circumstances. As before mentioned, 
I have respectfully applied to many representatives of the several branch fam- 
ilies whose records, in part, stand on the pages of this work, and they have 
obstinately declined to render the least assistance when it was in their power, 
by devoting only a few hours to correspondence, to have placed in my hands 
data that would have largely enhanced the value of the book both in histor- 
ical matter and literary appearance. These families will undoubtedly regret, 
when they shall see the book, that they did not appreciate my scheme enough 
to furnish their quota of records; but the opportunity has passed, the links of the 
chain are missing, and will never be placed historically where they belong. A hun- 
dred discouragements not proper to particularize here have been thrown in the 
author's way while engaged on this work, and one less determined would have for- 
saken the enterprise years ago. In humble circumstances at the beginning, with 
a family to support, he has many times applied himself so assiduously to this 
favorite employment that an overworked brain was warned him of the necessity of 
rest, and finally, to add the most painful embarrassment that could have been 
inflicted, he had a slight paralytic shock, which has so impaired the use of 
the right hand as to incapacitate him from all study and literary work for 
many months, and from which there is no hope of full recovery. 

The cash expense devoted to this undertaking during the past twelve years 
has been heavy, and was principally sustained by money earned by professional 
duties, writing for the press, and the sale of small publications that have been 
prepared within the same time. Many times I have spent my last dollar for 
stationery and postage stamps, and sometimes could not continue my corres- 
pondence for want of means. Two or three gentlemen who have possessed an 
interest in what I was seeking to accomplish, have generously forwarded money 
to assist me, and these have my grateful acknowledgments. 

At the family meeting held in Philadelphia in 1876, a plan was adopted to 
raise twelve hundred dollars toward the expense of completing my work, and 
five hundred dollars were pledged by responsible men, but the arrangement 
was not fully consummated aud proved abortive. This was a very unfavorable 
result, as engravings had been ordered on the strength of pledges made, and 
when the money was needed the men were not willing to contribute their pro- 
portion unless the whole amount could be raised. 

But my work is done, and imperfect as it is, must show for itself the result 
of my toil. I feel that my object has been a commendable one, and that I have 
faithfully used the materials placed in my hands. Those who know the least 
about such a work will have the least forbearance when they discover any mis- 
take in the book, while others will appreciate the attempt made to preserve in 
permanent form so many records and incidents belonging to our widely scattered 
kindred. Acknowledging my indebtedness to hundreds who have so kindly and 
promptly assisted me in various ways, and hoping every book placed in the 
hands of the family may be preserved with sacred care for the rising genera- 
tions, I commit the work to the custody of those whose names are embalmed 
within its pages. G T RIDLO x. 

M w in -i eb, n. ii.. March 12, 1884, 



HISTORY OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



The embellishment of this book has been very expensive. Works of a gene- 
alogical and biographical character are seldom illustrated, except by portraits 
and autographs, but I have deemed it advisable to insert views of the ancient 
residences of the principal families in England and Scotland, as well as some of 
the homestead houses in the United States. Original copies have been hard to 
obtain, especially in Great Britain, and those now having a place in this book 
were procured after the author had nearly exhausted his patience in uusuccessful 
efforts to secure them. Many of these ancient houses had never been photo- 
graphed, and being far from an artist, original views could only be had by paying 
considerable sums of money to induce photographers to go from their rooms to 
make negatives. In some instances proprietors kindly forwarded views made es- 
pecially for my use, at their own expense. Several of them furnished views taken 
from different standpoints, that I might make a choice. The views of residences, 
mills, and monuments were all lithographed from original photographs, with the 
exception of three, viz., " Friar's Carse," which was copied from a plate in a book, 
" Glen-Riddle Mills," made from a wood-engraving used for bill-heads by the 
owner, and " Hillside Farm," which was from a crayon-drawing by the author, 
consequently known to be correct representations of the places. A few individ- 
uals having an interest in my undertaking have paid for the views of their resi- 
dences, the others were printed for me at an expense of five hundred dollars, 
and paid for from my own pocket. These are all full-page plates in lithography 
and pen-drawing, printed in three tints, and in the judgment of many who 
possess artistic taste and culture are pronounced the most beautiful illustrations 
for a book of this class they have ever seen. I have photographic views of 
many more old residences of families whose records are in this book, but could 
not have them printed. 

The coats-of-arms, of which there are eight pages, representing twenty different 
shields, were engraved on box-wood from photographic copies, pen-drawings 
forwarded from England and Scotland, or from heraldic descriptions found in 
books, and are printed from color-blocks in gold and tints, at an expense of 
two hundred and eighty dollars, paid by the author. That with the motto, — 
"Jamais Arriere," — is copied from a photograph taken from a very fine framed 
drawing made many years ago for Thomas Ridlon of Boston, but I do not know 
whence he procured it. That with the two greyhounds for supporters was made 
from a drawing furnished me by Sir Walter-Buchanan Riddell, Bart., of Hep- 
pie, England, but the colors were assigned by the engraver. The arms of 



14 HISTOnY OF TLLUSTBATIONS. 

Riddell-Carre, combining the quarterings of the two families, was engraved from 
a wax seal forwarded by Mr. Riddel! Carre from Scotland. 

The portraits in this history were mostly engraved on steel by Messrs. F. T. 
Stewart and J. A. J. Wilcox, of Boston, Mass., and are line specimens of art as 
well as excellent likenesses of the individuals. These have cost, — the large- 
sized heads, — from seventy-five to one hundred dollars each, and were paid for 
by the originals or their families. The group of seven heads of European mem- 
bers of the family, was engraved at my own expense, and cost, with prints, one 
hundred and eighty-seven dollars. The group engraved on steel, of seven Amer- 
ican members of the Riddell and Riddle family, was subscribed for by the men 
themselves or their relatives, but as two died before the plate was finished, I 
have been obliged to pay nearly one hundred dollars on the same. The Ridlon 
group, comprising seven heads, was paid for by individuals. Four of the litho- 
graphic portraits were printed at my expense, and cost one hundred and twenty 
dollars. The portraits of Bishop Ridley, the martyr, — one on steel by John Sar- 
taiu, and one by the heliotype process, — were made to my order, at a cost of one 
hundred dollars. That of Mark Ridley, m. d., was lithographed from a copper- 
plate print found in London, Eng. ; and with the one of GlosterRidley, d. d., which 
was also made from a copper-plate found on the title-page of a book of his poems, 
were made to my order at an expense of fifty dollars. 

The portraits now engraved, with those ordered for this book, including prints, 
will cost rising two thousand dollars. 



Origin and changes of Surnames. 



The use of established surnames cannot be traced much earlier than the mid- 
dle of the tenth century. They first came into use in Normandy, in France, 
and at the coming of William the Conqueror were quite generally introduced 
into England. Many of the Norman adventurers who assisted in the Conquest, 
had taken the names of their residences, or of villages near their ancestral 
chateaux, names that were used with the French preposition de before them. 
Nearly all of the soldiers of William's army went back to their homes in Nor- 
mandy, and bestowed the lands awarded them in Eugland upon their younger 
sons, who came over and settled upon them, giving to these new estates their 
own names. When the Norman-French disappeared from England, the prefix 
de was completely discarded, unless retained for euphony, and the word "of" 
used as a substitute. The Scotch have a more expressive designation 
which they apply to families who have a territorial name; they say, "of that 
ilk." In Scotland, surnames were seldom used till the twelfth century, 
and were for a long time variable. The assumption of surnames by the 
common people is everywhere of later date than that by the gentle families. 
In England, the number of surnames is about forty thousand, or one to every 
five hundred individuals; in Scotland, far fewer surnames in proportion to the 
population. Surnames may be divided into several classes, as territorial, char- 
acteristic, mechanical, and personal. The names, Fairbanks, Burbank, Burn- 
ham, Washburn, Woodbridge, Woodbury, Bradbury, Mansfield, Kilburn, Swin- 
burn, and Riddell, are all territorial in origin. The names, Carpenter, Turner. 
Weaver, Brewer, Boulter, Chaplin, Goldsmith, Wheelwright, Gardner, Baxter, 
and Usher, are all derived from the occupation of ancestors of those families. 
Among the surnames taken from some characteristic of the individual who first 
used them, are Walker, Sleeper, Springer, Armstrong, Longstaff, Goodman, 
Lockheart, Douglass, Broadhead, and Longfellow. 

The reasons for the use of surnames are obvious. In localities where there 
were individuals of the same Christian name, they were distinguished by 
such names as "John the Cartwright " and "John the Carpenter"; and in a 
short time these becamed fixed family surnames. This would be true of two 
persons of one Christian name, dwelling in the same community, the one at 
Fairbanks, and the other at Mansfield ; one would be known as " William of 
Fairbanks," the other as " William of Mansfield," hence these names, so common 
in England and America. 

The original surname from which the various forms of orthography now used 
by the numerous branches of the family whose genealogy is found in this book 



16 OSIGIX A XI) CHANGES OF SUBNAMES. 

are supposed to have been derived, was local or territorial. Much discussion 
has been had respecting the origin and changes of the surnames Rydale and 
Ridel, and men of equal scholarship and research do not agree in their conclu- 
sions. How, then, can it be expected, that an author writing from an Ameri- 
can standpoint, will be able to lift this veil that has for so many generations 
held the subject in comparative obscurity? I shall only follow those whose 
advantages have qualified them to write with the claims of accuracy. The Sieur 
de Ridel, or Monsieur Ridel, whose name appears on the roll of Battle Abbey, 
the earliest record of the Normans who came with "William the Conqueror, 
was said to be the ancestor of all branches of the Riddell and Riddle family 
subsequently settled in England and Scotland, and that he was such, some very 
able antiquaries have maintained during the present century. The surname 
appears on the pages of the Domesday Book, and in a variety of forms, such 
as "Ridle," " Ridel," and " Ridell." We must look to Norway or Normandy for 
the origin of the name. An English authority says, " The name is a local 
one, from a place in Scandinavia called Rugdal, that is Ryedale, the valley of 
rye." This has been the opinion held by nearly all writers, and certainly has 
the best of grounds in history. Members of this Norman family settled in 
Yorkshire, and named their landed possessions "Ryedale": thence they settled 
in Scotland and called their lands there by their own surname. 

John Riddell, one of the greatest antiquaries ever known in Scotland, pos- 
sessed the deepest interest in this subject, and traced the name back to Nor- 
man records to procure every item of proof bearing upon its derivation and 
original orthography, and in his publications he claims for the " Riddells of 
Riddell," Roxburghshire, Scotland, the "Riddells of Cranstown-Riddell," the 
"Riddells of Ardnamurchan," and families of the name in England, a common 
origin. This gentleman, in one of his literary discussions with Mr. Cosmo 
Innes, who was considered by some equally eminent in the same line of 
research, took that gentleman to task for asserting in his preface to the " Char- 
tulary of Melrose," that the Riddells only acquired their surname from their 
lands in Roxburghshire, instead of giving it to their estate. In a work pub- 
lished by John Riddell, Esq., in 1843, called " Stewartiana," he has treated the 
subject of his family name with great fulness of illustration and instances the 
Gervase Ridel, who witnessed an inquisition of David, when Prince of Cumbria, 
A. D. 1116, as of the same family as Walter de Rydale, and mentions Chalmers' 
" Caledonia " as authority that the Riddells of Roxburgh spread into Mid- 
Lothian, and gave the name of "Cranstown-Riddell" to their lands there. More 
recent genealogists, with some claims to consideration, have taken exception to 
John Riddell's view of the case, and endeavor to prove that the Ridels and 
Rydales were originally distinct families. An examination of ancient papers 
has proved that the Riddells of Roxburgh, denominated "of that ilk" in deeds 
and monastic records, for several centuries from their first appearance in Scot- 
laud, are invariably * styled " de Ridale," and the other stock, now represented 
by the Riddells of Sunart, in Argyleshire, always had their surname spelled 
"Ridel" without the prefix de. Several authors claim " de Ridale" to be a 
local surname and "Ridel" as strictly persoual in its origin and significance. 
The same writers identify the Ridels of Cranstown with the Ridels of England ; 
these families having sided with the English in the Wars of the Succession, 

*There was one exception. "Walter Ridel " witnessed a charter by William the 
Lyon, Bay A. l >. I L66-] 174. 



ORIGIN AND CHANGES OF SURNAMES. 17 

lost their estate in Scotland. The cle Riclales, who do not appear prominently 
of that era, though they were near the Border, retained their lands until they 
sold them at a comparatively recent date. The name of Sir Hugh Ridel stands 
on the "Ragman's Roll," but none of the other families appear there. 

The Ridels of England were chiefly connected with Northamptonshire and 
Essex. In the "Pipe Roll" (1184) Hugh Ridel is found in possession of the 
land of Wittering, in the former county, and in the year 1192 Richard Ridel 
owned the same estate. A century later (1315) a Hugh Ridel petitions Edward II 
that the lands of Wittering, which had been taken from him by Edward I 
(because at the request of Simon Frizel, he stayed in Scotland with John de 
Balliol), and had been given to the petitioner's son, Geoflry Ridel, during the 
king's pleasure, might be restored to him. Thirty years afterwards (1348) 
another Hugh Ridell, son and heir of " Mons. Gefl'rei Ridell," petitions Edward 
III, for restoration of his lands of " Craneston in Loudion " (Cranstown-Riddell, 
Mid-Lothian, Scotland), out of which his father had been expelled by the Scots 
for his allegiance to the English crown, styling this property the "heritage of 
his ancestors." According to Bridges, they held Wittering till the reign of 
Edward IV, when the family ended in an heiress. 

At the same time the Ridels of Wittering and Cranstown appear in the "Pipe 
Rolls " of Henry II, and Richard I, the de Ridales of Roxburghshire, Scotland, 
are conspicuous in the "Chartulary of Melrose." One deed in that record gives 
remarkable evidence of four generations of this family co-existent in the twelfth 
century. Patrick de Ridale ; Walter, his son and heir; William, the son and heir 
of Walter; and William, son of William and grandson of Walter, all appear in 
this grant to Melrose. The deed that follows the one before mentioned is a con- 
tinuation by Eustace cle Vesci, their overlord, of the de Ridales grant. Singu- 
larly enough, one of the witnesses to this document was Gaufridus Ridel, who 
is not styled consanguineus, as he would have been had he been a relative. Hugh 
Ridel (before mentioned) also attests a confirmation by William the Lyon, of 
a grant by Patrick de Ridale to Melrose. At the same period the "Pipe 
Rolls" show that a Patrick and Roger de Ridale flourished in the County of 
York. Chalmers claims that the first of the Scotch de Ridales came from York- 
shire, and the Christian name Patrick favors that origin. Jordan Ridell of Til- 
mouth, in Northumberland, in 1230, had in his arms "three bars wavy" the same 
as the Ridels of Wittering, while the de Ridales had the "chevron between 
three ears of rye." Another authority claims the surname of the family of Rid- 
ded of Sunart, in its original orthography to have been personal and not terri- 
torial ; that its true form appears to be Rudellus or Rudel, though frequently 
spelled Ridel at an early date, but in no instance as de Ridel. He believes 
in three original branches, or distinct families, of the name, but his quotations 
do not sustain the arguments of others as to the identity between the English 
Riddells, and those of Argyleshire and Cranstown in Scotland. 

In Berwick-on-Tweed and Newcastle-on-Tyne the name has a continuous 
history. In "Historical Documents, Scotland, 1286-1306," under date Dec. 10, 
A. D. 1293, letters of safe conduct for " Phillipus de Ridall, burginsis et merca- 
tor de Berewyk" trading within the kingdom of England, were granted. In the 
"Wills and Inventories," edited by the Surtees Society, there is the name of a 
de Ridell continuing the tradition of Philip de Rydale as a burgess of Ber- 
wick-on-Tweed. Thomas de Ridell, who was a burgess of Berwick, in his 
will, 1615, names among his legatees, his nephew, Alexander de Ridell, together 
with William, a son, and Agnes, daughter of Alexander; and it may be worth 
2 



18 ORIGIX AND CHANGES OF SURNAMES. 



mention as a probable indication of consanguinity with the Eidalea of that ilk, 
that among his bequests occurs "live pounds to the building of the stone bridge 
of Tweed, at Rokisburgh," together with' " lxxx bordar" and "c bordar" to 
the chapel of the B. V. M. at Rokisburgh, besides a "donation to the Abbot 
and Convent of Kelkow." (Kelso.) 

Iu the "Correspondence, Inventories, etc.," of the Priory of Coldingham, the 
rental shows (1298) "Johannas Rydell" holding two curucates "in domonico" 
in Flemington. William de Hylton, the nuns of Berwick, and Matthew de Red- 
man are severally recorded as holding lands of the said J. Rydell. Under 
Lamberton, in the same rental, "Alicia quce fuit uxor Johannis Rydell,' is 
mentioned as having her dower of the third part of Flemington forfeited. " vx 
dicitur." Among the witnesses to the solemn excommunication pronounced at 
Norham, after the gospel at high mass of the feast of the translation of St. 
Cuthbert, 1467, against Patrick Home, Protonotary of our Lord, the Pope, and 
John Home, " assertus canonicus" in the collegiate church of Durham, Johan- 
nis Eidell is named among the "well-known Mends and kinsmen" of the said 
Patrick and John, who were present on the occasion. In another of the same 
series of documents may be found evidence that seems to point to the descenl 
of the Ridells of Flemington. It is taken "Ex Institutus, Thomce Prioris Dun- 
elmensis, A. D. MCCXXXV," and mentions among those who owed service to 
the Priory of Durham, from Coldinghamshire, " hoiredes Galfrid Ridel, et arum 
hoeredes de Flemington." It is in evidence that Galfridus Ridel was the name 
of the contemporary Lord of Blaye, in Aquitaine, whose letters to Benry III, 
are in "Royal Letters, Roll Series," under date 1247. The form of the name 
then given, and which is the prevailing form in " Gascon Rolls," Galfridus 
Rudelli " is suggestive of an eponymous hero, Ruddellus, or Rudel, and not of a 
territory the name of which had been taken by its owners. Nigellus Ridulli 
was one of the barons of Gascony, perverted to the king of France by the court 
of La Marche. Helias Ridell was one of Henry Ill's faithful barons and 
men, of whom Geoffrey Neville, Seneschal of Poitou and Gascony, makes suppli- 
cation in April, 1219. "Galfridus Rydel," "Galfridus Ridelli," and "Gaufridus 
Rudelli," such are the forms under which appear the Lords of Blaye (in France), 
senior and junior, who bore that Christian name during the reign of Henry III 
and Edward II, whose names are found in many public documents in England 
and Gascony. 

At what date the Roxburghshire family gave their name to their lands is not 
precisely known. Walter de Ridale got his lands from David I, between 1124 
and 1153, by charter, and these wen- subsequently denominated the "Baronies 
of Riddell and Whittou." Quintin Ridale is the first of this house styled "of 
that ilk"; he died in 1471. It will be seen that the family at Berwick-on-Tweed 
and others at Flemington, evidently derived from the family of Blaye, used the 
prefix "de" with their surname, proving that their possessions in Scotland and 
England were called Ridell or Rydale. The several branches <>f the family seem 
to have followed out their early custom of bestowing their own names upon 
their lands whenever and wherever acquired, and we have " Cr.-instown-Riddell," 
" Glen-Riddell," " Mount-Riddell," " Minto-Riddell," in Scotland: and "Glen- 
Riddle," "Riddle's Banks," ••Riddle'- Station," "Riddleton," and --Riddle's 
Cross-roads," in the United State-. 

The Norman ancestors held their earldoms for several generations as a dis- 
tinct family, before a surname was assumed by them, each .successor being known 
by his Christian name; but there are abnndant evidences to prove that the sur- 



ORIGIN AND CHANGES OF SURNAMES. 19 



name used by the Roxburghshire and Northumberland families was originally 
derived from a place known as Ryedale, and the ears of rye and sheaves of 
grain, almost universally found in their coats-of-arms from their earliest his- 
tory, should be a sufficient proof, supplemented by the orthography of the name, 
without looking any further. In early times there was no established form of 
spelling surnames, and those of the same individual are frequently found in old 
records in a variety of forms, written undoubtedly according to the fancy of 
the recorder, and not by authority of the one who bore the name. 

Nearly all branches of the Scottish families have spelt the name " Riddell," 
but there are many old documents on which it is spelled "Riddle" in the Scotch 
and English houses ; and there have been, and are now, many small branches 
in Scotland and England, claiming descent from the Ryedales, who spell their 
own names "Riddle"; among them the "Riddles of Troughend," of which the 
late Edward Riddle, Master of the Greenwich Naval School, was oue. 

Many branches settled in the north of Ireland ; some from the Roxburgh fam- 
ily, some from the Gleu-Riddell branch of the same tree; and others evidently 
descended from the Riddells of Argyleshire, and many of them spell the name 
Riddle, Riddel, Riddall, and Ruddell. 

An early offshoot of the Norman Ridels settled in Germany; and their nu- 
merous descendants, now scattered over the wide world, spell their names Ridel, 
Riedel, Reidel, and Riedell. 

One family in the Southern States are descended from emigrants from France, 
and in the first generations spelt their names Riddelle. Many of the Scotch- 
Irish families came to the United States, and a majority of them now spell 
their names Riddle; some Riddile. 

A family early settled in Kentucky spelled their surname Ruddle. And de- 
scendants of one Virginian branch still spell the name Ruddell, nearly identical 
with the Latin forms. 

The early New Jersey families were Scottish, and uniformly used the orthog- 
raphy Riddell for several generations. But their names on the Colonial records 
are frequently spelt Riddle, a name now used by their descendants. 

The surname Ridley, or de Ridleigh, like others in this book, has been under 
much discussion, and authors of great antiquarian information disagree as to its 
derivation. Some look to their ancient coat-of-arms as proof for their claims 
that Ridleigh, as the name was spelt in early times, was derived from a place 
in Cheshire owned by the ancestors of the family, where reeds grew. The shield 
in a coat-of-arms is sometimes called a "field," and as this had an ox passing 
through reeds in the arms of Ridleigh, it is said the original form was Reedfield, 
"leigh " in the old language meaning a field or meadow. This would seem reason- 
able enough if we could find the name spelled Reedfield, or Reedleigh, in any 
old document. Does any such proof appear ? Another writer gives the same 
derivation for the terminal part of the surname, but ascribes another meaning 
to the prefix "Rid," which, being sometimes spelled "Red" in old English, 
signifies to clear away or make clean; hence, combined with "leigh," would rep- 
resent a clean field or cleared land. Nearly all writers have assigned a terri- 
torial origin to the surname, but trace it to a source far removed from Ridley 
Hall in Cheshire, England. In a biographical uotice of Bishop Nicholas Ridley, 
in the Parker edition of his writings, it is stated, "the origin of the name Rid- 
ley may be traced more satisfactorily than that of many others now equally 
illustrious. It appears to have been Scottish, and originally Ridel or Ryedale, 



20 OBIGIX AND CHANGES OF SUBNAMES. 

of which Riddle is a corruption; and the Riddells of Glen-Riddell might have 
traced their descent to a common stock with the Ridleys of Willimoteswick." 
John Ridley, a brother-in-law of Bishop Ridley, was buried in the Haltwhistle 
Church, Northumberland, England: and his name in the inscription on his 
tomb is spelled "Redle" or •' Ridle," exactly the same as the name of one of 
the Norman ancestors of the Riddells. as found in the Domesday Book. One 
ancient author calls Ridley a "gentile name," and another, writing in 1049, 
mentions Ridley among thirty-seven families of Northumberland "dating back to 
the Conquest." I have not found any mention of the name dating prior to the 
settlement of the Norman Ridels and de Ridales in England and Scotland, but 
the appearance of the surname de Ridleigh or Ridley, in the north, is contem- 
porary with that of Ridale on the border, across the Tyne. In ancient doc- 
uments, now extant, in the College of Arms, London, and in the British Museum, 
the surname is spelled Riddley and Ridlea. 

The B idlers of England and America descended from a family in Gloucester- 
shire, are an offshoot of the Ridleys of Willimoteswick, and assumed the same 
arms and crest. 

The Midlands and Bidlons are descended from an ancient Norman, Robert de 
Rhuddlau, or de Ryddland, who settled in Wales, and was resilient at Rhudd- 
lau Castle on the river Clwyd. in the County of Flint. (See "Rhuddlaus and 
Ridlands," in this book.) The Ridlands descended from one Adam Ridland 
from the Orkney Islands, were early settled in Shetland, and seem to have 
spelt their surname uniformly. 

Magnus Ridland, or Readlau, came from Shetland to New England in 1718, 
and after changing his name from Ridland to Readlau and Redlan, uually 
adopted the form Redlon, and continued it through life. His seveu sons spelt 
their own names Redlon, and so did nearly all of the third generation, although 
towu-clerks and Justices of the Peace frequently wrote their names Ridlou, Red- 
lone, and Ridley. The Buxton branch and the Damariscotta branch of Maine, 
have always retained their ancestors name of Redlon. The Hollis branch changed 
to Ridlou first, but the families at Saco. and in other towns, soon adopted the 
same form. Families in the west, originally from Maine, spell the surname 
Ridlen, Ridlin, and Redley. Some of the fathers changed the spelling at the 
request of an old Scotch school-master, under whose instruction they were 
early placed. 

The descendants of Matthias Redlon, who went to Kennebec County, from Saco, 
Me., nearly all changed their names to Bidley, a very unwise action, that has 
resulted in great confusion and embarrassment ever since. There were families 
named Ridley, descended from the Cape Cod branch, early settled in eastern 
Maine, and almost every one addressed the Redlous by that name; they became 
weary of correcting the mistake, and supposing these Ridleys to be a branch 
of the same family, adopted their name. Samuel Ridlon and his descendants of 
Hollis, Me., however, and John his brother, who settled in Vermont, continued 
to spell their surname Ridlon, while their brothers in the east changed to 
Ridley. 

It is a matter of surprise to many who are unacquainted with family history, 
that any surname should be changed; but the causes are numerous and trace- 
able. It is well known by all antiquarians, that in early times there was no 
established rule for spelling in the Old World, and surnames are found in a 
variety of forms on ancient documents and monumental inscriptions. Few sur- 



ORIGIN AND CHANGES OF SUBNA WES. 21 

names of families whose ancestors were early settled in New England, are now 
spelled as they were when introduced into the colonies ; and if such families 
could trace their names to an early period in English history, they would 
undoubtedly find that their ancestors were known by names quite unlike those 
borne by the early American generations. In the "old English" all surnames 
now spelt with the letter i were originally written with a y, as in Chamberlayne 
and Rydleigh or Rydley. 

In the early New England Colonies representatives of several nationalities, 
English, Scotch, Irish. French, and Scandinavians, were constantly associated, 
and each, having a pronunciation peculiar to himself, found it necessary to 
accommodate his language to the understanding of others ; in consequence of 
this modification, constantly carried on, names of men and things in a short 
time were pronounced quite diflereutly from what they were originally written. 
As the early settlers had few advantages for acquiring even a primary education, 
and but few occasions to write their names, justices, clerks, and clergy, who 
used the pen, wrote surnames as they heard them spoken, following each pro- 
nunciation in their spelling as closely as they could. The rising generations, 
who had a better education, by consulting the records of towns and churches, 
learned to spell their names as they found those of their ancestors written, and 
in a few years families were known by surnames very dissimilar to those borne 
by their progenitors. 

With all the mutations through which the surnames used by the various 
branches of our clan have passed, it is interesting to observe that a marked 
resemblance has been preserved in the orthography and the significance of them 
all. The original form seems to have been derived from a dale or dell where 
rye was cultivated, and properly written would be Ryedale or Ryedell. Dale 
and dell are synouamous names, as — 

"In (tefey and dells concealed from mortal siyln." 

The change from Ryedale and Riddell to Riddle, — as the name is always pro- 
nounced by Scotchmen, — has not caused a loss of the full meaning of the original, 
as a riddle was an instrument by which rye and other grains were winnowed 
and cleansed ; and the change to Ridler and Riddler, makes that form denote one 
who winnows grain with a riddle or seive. The old English word Bed or Bid, 
signifies to cleanse or drive out, as, "I will rid my fields of evil beasts." 
The ancient word, leigh and ley, represented a field or meadow, a low piece 
of ground, and counected with rid would, in its proper spelling, be Cleared 
field or Cleanland. If the surname Ridleigh or Ridley was derived from this 
source, the meaning resembles that of the original Norman name of Ryedale. 
But if what has been called reeds in the ancient arms of the Ridleys of Willi- 
moteswick, should prove to he rye instead, — which seems quite probable, — then 
the full name Ridleigh would be Ryefield or Ryeland, which is the exact equiv- 
alent of Ryedale or Ryedell. The same is true of the surname Ridland, as now 
used by the branch of the family in Sandsting, Shetland Isles. The territorial 
or local and agricultural significance of the surname has never been lost by the 
many changes in spelling during thirty generations of the family. 

In one ancient coat-of-arms borne by a branch of the Ryedale family from 
Normandy, there was a plough, and some heralds represent the ox in the ancient 
arms of Ridley, as drawing a plough through reeds in a field; this fact 
strengthens the claim to relationship between the two families. 



22 



FAMILY CHRISTIAN XAMh'S. 



I give below a catalogue comprising the forms of spelling found in books and 
records, —sixty in all. 



Radley. 

Radi.^ . 

Readies. 

Read land. 

Reddel. 

Reddle. 

Redel. 

Redla. 

Redlan. 

redlon. 



REDLONE. 

redly. 

Reedleigh. 

reidell. 

reidel. 

R.TT>AT.TC. 

REDDAL. 
RlDDALL. 

Riddel. 
Rtddile. 



riddle. 
Rtddli \. 

RlDDLEON. 

RlDDLER. 

RIDDLEY. 

Ridel. 

RlDELL. 

Ridelus. 
Rid la. 

Uiih.ani). 



RlDLE. 
RlDLE \. 

Rtdlegh. 

RlDLEIGH 

RlDLEN. 

RlDLEON. 

RlDLER. 

Rll>u:\ . 

RlDLIEGH 

RIDLIN. 



Rtdling. 

RlDLION. 
RlDLON. 
RlDLT. 
RTBDEL. 

Rtedell. 

ROD] I I'. I! 
RUDDALL. 
RtTDDEL. 
RDDDELI. 



RUDDELL. 

Ruddle. 

RUDDELl 5. 

RODEL. 

RYDALE. 

Rl I'M. I.. 
Rl DELL. 
Rl EDALE. 
RYEDEL. 

Ryedell. 



FAMILY CHRISTIAN NAMES. 



Names distinguishing one individual from another have been in use from the 
earliest ages of human society. Among the Jews, the name given to a child 
originated in some circumstauce of birth, or was an expression of religious 
sentiment. Old Testament names are almost all original, given in the first in- 
stance to the person bearing them. 

The Greeks bore only one name, given the tenth day after birth, which was 
the right of the father to choose and alter if he pleased. The early Greek 
names are expressive of some quality held in great estimation, as valor, skill, 
wisdom, or gracefulness. (Callimachus, excellent fighter; Pherecrates, strength 
bringer; Sophron, wise; Melauthus, black flower). 

The Romans at a very early period bore two names, and subsequently every 
Roman citizen had three. The names Caius, Marcus, Cneius, like our Christian 
uames, were personal to the individual. These names were given to Roman 
children at the attainment of puberty in early times, and afterwards on the 
uinth day after birth. The Roman uames were originally less dignified than 
the Greeks; some were derived from ordinary employments, as Porcius (swine- 
herd), Cicero (vetch grower); some from personal peculiarities, as Crassus (fat), 
Naso (long-nosed), and a few from numerals, Sextus, Septimus. 

Celtic and Teutonic names, lik'> the Jewish and Greek, were originally very 
significant, and to check their exuberance the people contented themselves by 
passing them down from father to son. Many names in Europe, in consequence 
of the changed speech of the people, belong to an obsolete tongue, and their 
signification has become unintelligible. Some were derived from God, as Gott- 
fried, Godfrey, Godwin; some from inferior gods, as Anselm, Oscar, Esmond; 
others from elves or genii, as Alfred, Alboin, Elfric (Elf king). Bertha is the 
name of a favorite female goddess and source of light; the same name com- 
pounded is Albrecht, Bertram. Many names indicating personal prowess, wis- 
dom, and nobility of birth, belong to the following class : Hildebrand (war 
brand), Konrad (bold in counsel), Hlodwig (glorious warrior), now called 
Clovis, and the original of Ludwig and Louis. The wolf, bear, eagle, boar, 
and lion entered into the composition of the names of men, as Adolf (noble 
wolf), Arnold (valiant eagle), Osborn (God bear). 



FAMILY CHRISTIAN NAMES. 23 



The Puritans, acting under strong religious interests would admit of but two 
classes of names for their children, — those expressive of religious sentiment, 
such as Praise-God, Live-well, Wait-still, and names which occur in Scripture; 
hence in the early generations of the New England families the Christian names, 
Patience, Charity, Mercy, Hope, Grace, and Lovie are of frequent occurrence. 
The use of two or more Christian names is a comparatively modern practice, 
as also the use of surnames in place of Christian names 

There are a few Christian names in this book worthy of notice in this article. 
In the Norman house of Ryedale, or Ridel, Walgrinus stands at the head of the 
pedigree, and does not occur again in any branch of the clan. Galfridus, Gau- 
fridus, and Gaufrid (different forms of the same name) are transmitted from 
father to son, and from successor to successor, until borne by thirteen or more 
members of the family. 

Geoffrey and Geofery are names used during the early generations of the Nor- 
man Ridels. Gervase, or Gervasius, was one of the first of the Anglo-Norman 
representatives of the race who settled in Scotland, and it is a little singular 
that this ancestral name was not continued in that branch of the Riddell family ; 
of late, however, after being laid away more than seven hundred years, it has 
been resuscitated by a descendant of the original Gervasius, and is now used 
both in Scottish and American branches of the family. The female Christian 
names, Geva and Grizel, early introduced into the Ryedale family, have also been 
revived and bestowed upon children of the Riddell and Ridlon name in Scotland 
aud the United States. Amongst the singular names found in the Scottish house 
of Ridale, are Auskittel and Quintin. The former was derived from the family 
of Aukittell, or Anskitell, now of "Mount Aukitell," and " Aukitill Grove," 
County Monaghan, Ireland, connected with the "Riddells of Glasslough." by 
marriage in 1768 ; the name Quintin appears but once in the Riddell family, and 
whence derived is not known, but is the name of a saint in the Roman Calendar, 
and of a distinguished painter, born at Antwerp in 1460. 

The name Hans in a branch of the family of Roxburghshire, Scotland, early 
settled in Ireland, as well as the name Gavin or Gaioin, peculiar to a Scotch- 
Irish branch of the Riddell family, early settled in New Hampshire, were derived 
from the Hamilton and Douglas families, in which the latter is found as far 
back as 1520. 

The Ridleys of Willimoteswick have perpetuated several ancient Christian 
names peculiar to the early generations, such as Nicholas, Christopher, Cuthbert, 
Launcelot, and Mark. Nicholas Ridley, the Martyr Bishop, was probably named 
for his uncle, or Sir Nicholas Ridley the "Broad Knight," and having cast a 
halo over the family name by his religious zeal and great learning, every gen- 
eration since has had one or more representatives named Nicholas. The father 
of the Martyr was Christopher Ridley of Unthank, and many have since borne 
his Christian name, especially descendants from the "Ridleys of Battersea." 

Cuthbert Ridley was sometime (say 1625) rector of Simonburn Church, in 
Northumberland, England; his Christian name has been kept in the Ridley 
family of Mickley, from father to son for six successive generations, and is now 
used by descendants in New York. 

Mark, as a Ridley name, goes back to 1623, when Dr. Mark Ridley was a sur- 
geon in London. Since that date the name has occurred in the English and 
American families, and is still used by the descendants of Mark Ridley, who 
settled in Barnstable County, Mass., as early as 1660. 

The Ridley family, now so numerous in the Southern States, have continued 



2 I FA '///. K CHBISTIA V V.I WE6 

the use of the Christian name. Boh rt. borne by their common ancestor, who 
came from England in 1635. Bromfield, a surname used as a Christian name in 
this family, is still handed down by members in the legal profession. 

The name Magnus is peculiar to the Redlon and Ridlon families in New Eng- 
land, descended from Magnus Beadlan, or Ridland. who came from the Shetland 
Islands in 1718. The name signifies strength, or attraction, ami i- from the same 
root as the ancient names .Magi and Magician, applied to those who were sup- 
posed to possess some remarkable and mysterious power. From the same 
Latin root we have magnes, magnet, and magnate. The loadstone, having a 
hiilden power of attraction, has been called in literature, "The mighty mag- 
nes stone." Magnus was assumed by many of the ancients as a surname, 
amouir them by Pompey, from the greatness of his exploits. The name 
is common in Norway and Shetland, being directly derived from the kings of 
the former country and Sweden, of which there were six who bore that name. 
Kinir Magnus II reigned twenty-eight years previous to 1070 A. D., and his son 
and successor, Magnus III, fifty-two years, to L180. In Kirkwall, the principal 
town of the Orkney Islands, is St. Magnus' Cathedral, founded in 1136 A. D. 
St. Magnus' Bay, on the west coast of the mainland of Shetland, affords an ex- 
cellent anchorage for large vessels. Magnus was also the name of a king of the 
Isle of Man, 1204 A. D. 

The name has been handed down from generation to generation, in the Red- 
lon and Ridlon families, but when the author commenced this book, there were 
but two persons in the connection bearing it, and one of them only as a middle 
name. Siuce this family history was undertaken, the author has had the honor 
of bestowing this grand old kingly and aucestral family name upon several little 
fellows who bear the Ridlon surname, and it is hoped the Christian name Magnus 
will never be allowed to drop out of the old sept. 

Matthias is a name much used in the early generations of the Redlon and Rid- 
lon family, and came from the family of Young, in Kittery, Me., of whom the 
first wife of Magnus Redlon, our common progenitor, was a member. This old 
scriptural name represents our ancestors on the maternal side, and should be per- 
petuated by the Ridlons as long as there is one of the name. 

The name Abraham, in the Ridlon family, was derived from the Townseuds, 
of Saco. Massie. daughter of Abraham Townsend, sometime of Lynn. Ma--., 
was the second wife of Magnus Redlon, and named her eldest son for her 
father: that son died unmarried, and although the name has been perpetuated 
in other branches of the Ridlon family, there are now no male descendants of 
Massie Townsend who bear our surname. 

Robert is a name introduced into the Redlon family by the marriage of John 
Redlon, of Buxton, Me., with a daughter of Robert Brooks. The eldest son 
was named Robert for his maternal grandfather, and became the head of the 
Damariscotta Bedlons. Another daughter of Robert Brooks was the wife of 
David Martin, and named a son Robert for her father, from whom by inter- 
marriage subsequently, between the Ridlons and Martins, the name Robert came 
into the family again, but from the same original source. I incline to the belief 
that Robert Ridlon, of Hollis, Me. (deceased), was named for a Robert Cousens 
of his mother's family. 

The name Ebenezer, of the Buxton family of Ridlons. came from the Youngs 
of Kittery, by the marriage of Magnus Redlon with Susanna, daughter of Matthew 
Young, a Scotchman. 

Nathaniel came to the Ridlons from the Townsend family; Thomas, from the 
Edgcombs. 



HERALDRY. 



Ali- the ancient nations mentioned in history, wore some kind of defensive 
armor when in battle; sometimes of leather, of brass, of iron, and of steel. 
Some of the more luxurious had their coats of mail and helmets richly orna- 
mented with gold and silver. In Bible times the sacred writers were acquainted 
with shields, breastplates, and helmets. When coats of armor were of thick 
leather, they were padded with some elastic material that would deaden a blow 
of sword or spear. Scale armor was composed of plates of brass, iron, or steel, 
so formed and joined together, as to adapt itself to the necessary movements of 
the wearer's body. Armor originally only covered the head and the shoulders, 
but in the days of William the Conqueror, men of war were clothed from crown 
to toe in armor made of plate, or steel rings. In process of time the old 
knights and chiefs had devices on their shields which represented their prowess 
and were sometimes significant of their family name or place of residence ; then 
a crest was worn on the helmet, well known to the followers of the chief, that 
could be seen in battle, and served as an ensign. These symbols and devices 
painted on the shields were of endless variety, " from the highest things celes- 
tial, to the lowest things terrestrial." Sometimes surcoats made of leather were 
worn over the armor of polished brass or steel, to protect the wearer from the 
heat of the sun, and the devices that had been painted on the shield, were also 
embroidered ou these overgarments ; thus the arms became visible to every 
beholder in battle, without the aid of a standard ; from this method of display- 
ing emblems and armorial bearings, arose the term, cote armure, or coat-of-arms. 
Many of the ancient monumental effigies in England, represent men dressed in 
armor, covered with a sui'coat on which are their armorial bearings, exactly cor- 
responding with those on their battle shields. In the middle ages, armorial 
devices had become so systematized that they formed a language which the 
most iguoraut could understand. The learned and the unlearned could read the 
symbolic picture, which was presented to the eye in a thousand ways, till the 
system was interwoven with the character and teaching of the people. Nearly 
every mansion was decorated with armorial insignia ; the ancestry of a family 
was known by the shields in the upper parts of the windows. 

The church favored armorial bearings. Knights took their banners to be 
blessed by the priests before going to engage in the Crusade wars, and on 
their return, these trophies, covered with honorable decorative charges, were sus- 
pended in the churches, and being of a perishable nature, the distinctions were 
in time permanently displayed in the glass of the windows, the frescoes of the 
walls, or carved in stone in the building itself. 



26 HERALDRY. 



In the infaucy of heraldry, every knight assumed what armorial distinctions 
he pleased, without consulting his sovereign. Animals, plants, imaginary mon- 
sters, things artificial, and objects familiar to pilgrims were adopted; and when- 
ever possible, the object chosen was one the name of which bore some resem- 
blance in sound to suggest the name of the bearer. The Appletons have three 
apples in their shield; the Bells, three bells; the Masons, three trowels; the 
Swans, three birds of that name; and the Ryedales, three ears of rye. As coats- 
of-arms became more numerous, confusion ofteu arose from the use. by different 
knights, of the same symbols ; and this confusion was augmented by the prac- 
tice of feudal chiefs in allowing their followers to bear their arms in battle as 
a mark of honor. In this way difl'ereut coats-of-arms so closely resembled each 
other, that it was imperative, for distinction's sake, that some restrictions and 
ivmilatious should be laid down respecting the character, number, and position 
of the figures represented on the shields. This neres>ity led, in the course of 
time, to the development of a regular system of heraldry, and the ancient rolls 
show that the process was going on in the thirteenth and fourteenth ceuturies. 
In England, the assumption of arms by private persons was first restrained by a 
proclamation from Henry V, which prohibited every one who had not borne arms 
at Agincourt to assume them, except in virtue of inheritance or a grant from the 
crown. To enforce this rule, heralds' visitations through the counties were insti- 
tuted, and continued from time to time, for centuries. So strict were the laws 
regardiug coats-of-arms at this time, that a man who had assumed certain armo- 
rial bearings without proper authority, lost one of his ears as a penalty. When 
herald visitations were instituted, all persons claiming the right to bear anus 
were warned to assemble at some stated place in the district, and to bring with 
them all arms, crests, and pedigrees, for examination by the herald's deputy, 
and present evidence of their genuineness. 

In the united kingdom of Great Britain, no one is entitled to bear arms with- 
out a hereditary claim by descent, or a grant from the competent authority, 
this jurisdiction being executed by the Herald's College in England, the Lyon 
Court in Scotland, and the College of Arms in Ireland. It is illegal to use 
without authority, not only a coat-of-arms, but even a crest. The passion for 
outward distinction is so deeply implanted in human nature, that in this country, 
where all differences of rank are repudiated, men are found assuming heraldic 
devices, and the interest in this practice has so increased that hundreds of 
families have framed coats-of-arms hanging on the walls of their houses, en- 
graved on their jewelry, displayed on their stationery, and even painted on the 
doors of their carriages, in imitation of the aristocracy of Great Britain. Some 
of these coats-of-arms were authoritatively borne by their ancestors in the old 
country, and others are fictitious, having been originally drawn or painted by men 
who early canvassed New England with books containing cuts of shields and 
appendages, purporting to have been granted to families in England and Scot- 
land, which they claimed our American ancestors had a right to bear, by virtue 
of relationship. 

As many who will read this book do not understand the "language of her- 
aldry," the characters and abbreviations used in describing the coats-of-arms that 
have been borne by the various branches of the Riddel] and Ridley families, will 
be unintelligible, unless a comprehensive explanation is given, to which reference 
may be had for directions. Such a chapter will be both interesting and instructive 
to all who possess any family pride, as well as to the general reader. The fol- 
lowing articles, with tables, will be all that is necessary for this purpose: — 




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HERALDR Y. 2 



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ATTITUDES AND POSITIONS OF ANIMALS IN COATS-OF-ARMS. 

When a lion, or other beast of prey, stands upright, with only one eye and 
ear seen, he is termed rampant; when walking forward with one eye and ear 
seen, passant; when sitting with one eye and ear seen, sejant; when lying 
down with one eye and ear seen, couchant. If in any of these positions the 
animal turns his face fully to the front, so that both eyes and ears are seen, 
the word guardant is annexed to those of rampant, passant, sejant, as the case 
may be. If the animal look backward with only one eye and ear seen iu any 
of the positions above named, the word regardant is annexed to those of ram- 
pant, passant, sejant, as the case may be. An animal in a coat-of-arms is said 
to be saliant when leaping forward. Animals of the deer kind, when looking 
full-faced, are said to be at gaze; when standing, statant ; when walking, trip- 
pant; when looking forward, springing; when running, courant ; and when at 
rest on the ground, lodged. A horse when running, is said to be courant, or 
full-speed; when leaping, saliant; when standing, forcene. Birds when standing 
with wings down, are said to be close; when preparing to fly, rising; when 
flying, volent ; when stretched out and their breast seen, displayed; when wings 
are open and against each other, they are said to be endorsed ; only one wing is 
called dernivol. Fishes, when placed horizontally, are called naiant; when per- 
pendicular, hauriant ; when in an arched form, they are embowed. 

APPENDAGES TO THE SHIELD. 

The helmet, helme, casque, or morion, as it is variously designated, has varied 
in shape in different ages and countries. The most ancient form is the sim- 
plest, — composed of iron, of a shape fitted to the head, and flat upon the top, 
with an aperture for the light. This is styled the " Norman helmet," and appears 
on very ancient seals, attached to the gorget, a separate piece of armor which 
covered the neck. In the twelfth century a change was made, to mark the 
rank of the individual bearer. 

The helmet assigned to kings and princes of royal blood is placed upon the 
shield in arms with the face full to the front, and composed of gold, with the 
beauvoir, or visor, divided by six projecting bars and lined with crimson. 

The helmet of the nobility is of steel, with the five bars of gold, and is placed 
on the shield in coats-of-arms, inclining to profile. 

The helmet of knights and baronets is of steel, full-faced, with the visor thrown 
back, and without bars. 

The helmet of esquires always depicted in profile, is of steel, with the visor 
closed. 

Each of the helmets is placed immediately above the shield, or escutcheon, 
and supports the wreath, which is under the crest. The lambrequin, a kind of 
mantle or hood, is placed on the head between the helmet and crest, and 
depicted, in heralds' language, fiattant behind the wearer. The shape of the 
lambrequin was most capricious, for, as it was probably cut through with the 
sword iu battle, it afforded certain evidence of prowess. 

The wreath, upon which the crest is usually borne, is composed of two cords 
of silk twisted together; the one tinctured with the principal metal, and the 
other with the principal colors in the arms. The wreath, in ancient times, was 
used to fasten the crest to the helmet. It is made circular, but when seen in 
coats-of-arms, is seen with the side view. 

The crest, or cognizance (derived from the Latin word, crista, a comb, or 



28 HEBALDRT. 



tuft), originated in the thirteenth century; and, towering above other objects, 
served to distinguish the combatants when engaged in conflict. No crest is 
ever found on the arms borne by females. Unless otherwise stated, it is always 
on the wreath ; which need not, therefore, be named on the blazon. 

Supporters are figures placed on each side of the shield in coats-of-arms ; and, 
as the name indicates, seem to hold it up. In England, the right to bear sup- 
porters is confined to Peers of the Realm, Knights of the Garter and Bath, and 
to those who may have obtained them by royal grant. The Gartcr-King-at-arms 
has no right to grant them to any person of lower rank than a Kuight of the 
Bath, unless acting under special directions from the Sovereign ; but in Scotland, 
Lord Lyon may, by virtue of his office, do so without any royal warrant. In 
Scotland, the right to bear supporters is universally conceded to the chiefs of 
the various clans. 

DIVISIONS OF THE SHIELD. 

The surface of the escutcheon, or shield, is called the field, and is divided into 
the following parts, A. B, C : the chief, sub-divided into A, the dexter, or right- 
hand chief point; B, the middle chief point; C, the sinister, or left-hand chief point; 
D, the collar, or honor-point; E, the heart, or fess-point; F, the nombriel, or 
naval-point; and G, H, I, the base, sub-divided into G, the dexter base-point; H, 
the middle base-point; and I, the sinister base-point. 

TINCTURES USED IN ARMS. 

The shield, or escutcheon, in arms is distinguished by certain armorial colors, 

called tinctures, which are separated by division lines which run across the 

shield, and are ornamented with animals, instruments, and other objects called 

charges. The tinctures used in heraldry are metals, colors, and furs; and by 

the ancient heralds precious stones were used. (See heraldic tables.) 

Or — gold, is known in uncolored drawings and engravings by small dots or 
points on the white surface. 

Argent — silver, is expressed by a plain, white surface iu the shield, in uncol- 
ored views. 

Azure — blue, is depicted by horizontal lines, finely drawn across the surface 
of the shield. 

Gules — red, is depicted by perpendicular lines, finely drawn from the top to 
the base of the shield. 

Vert — green, is depicted by lines running from the dexter chief- to the sini- 
ster base-points on the shield. 

Sable — black, is depicted by cross-lines running horizontally and perpendic- 
ularly across the shield. 

Purpure — purple, is depicted bylines running from the sinister chief- to the 
dexter base-points on the shield. 

Ermine — a white shield with black spots, representing ermine fur worn by 
members of the royal household. 

Ermines — a black shield with white spots, — an exact contrast to the former. 

Erminois— a gold surface to the shield, with black spats. 

Pearl — a shield with black surface, filled with gold spot>. 

Vair — composed originally of pieces of fur, but now of silver and blue colors, 
cut to resemble the flower of the campanula, and opposed to each other in rows. 
When depicted iu colors, they are specified vaire. 

CoiJNTER-VAii: — differs from vair by having the bells, or cups, arranged base 
against base aud point against point, just the reverse of vair. 

Potent-( orxTER-i'OTENT — is composed of figures, resembling crutch-heads, 
placed in rows upon the white shield. 



HERALDRY. 



29 



Old heralds used more minute distiuctious. The arms of gentlemen, esquires, 
knights, and baronets, they blazoned by tinctures ; those of the nobility, by 
precious stoues; and those of emperors, kings, and other sovereign princes, 
by planets. 

HERALDIC TABLE. 



Color* and Metals. 


Tinctures. 


Precious Stones. 


Planets. 


Nam is 
Abbreviated. 


Yellow, or Gold. 


Or. 


Topaz. 


.Sol. 


O., Or. 


White, or Silver. 


Argent. 


Pearl. 


Luna. £ 


A., A.R. 


1 Slack. 


Sable. 


Diamond. 


Saturn. »> 


S., S v. 


Red. 


Gules. 


Ruby. 


Mars, j 1 


G., <,i . 


Blue. 


Azi;re. 


Sapphire. 


Jupiter. % 


B., Az. 


Green. 


\ ERT. 


Emerald. 


Venus. ; 


V., Vert. 


Purple. 


PlJRPURE. 


\MKTIIVST. 


Mercury. $ 


P., PURP. 


Tawny. 


Tenm:. 


JACYNTH. 


Dragon's Head. 


T., Ten. 


Murrey. 


Sanguine. 


Sardonyx. 


Dragon's Tail. 


Sg.; Sang. 



PARTITION LINES. 

The partition lines in heraldry are those that divide the shield, or charge, and 
are always right lines unless otherwise described by the following names, viz., 
engrailed, invected, wavy, nebule, embattled, indented, and dancette. Added to 
these are sometimes ragnly and dove-tails. The following will explain the divi- 
sions of the shield in coats-of-arms : — 

Per-pale. The shield divided into two equal parts, by a perpendicular line. 

Quarterly. The shield divided into four equal parts, by a horizontal and 
perpendicular lines, crossing at right angles in the center. 

Party- per-fess. The shield divided by a horizontal Hue into four equal parts, 
chief and base. 

Party-per-bend. The shield divided into equal parts by a line running from 
the dexter chief to the sinister base. 

Party-per-chevron. The shield divided by lines running from the sinster 
and dexter naval-points to the centre of the field, in the form of rafters. 

Party-per-saltire. The shield divided by two lines running from sinister 
and dexter naval-points, and crossing each other in heart or fesse-point of the 
escutcheon. 

Gyronny-of-Eight. The shield divided into eight parts by two lines running 
horizontally and perpendicularly, crossing in the fesse-point; and two lines run- 
ning from the dexter and sinister naval-points to the dexter and sinister chief- 
points. 

The Chief. The shield divided by a horizontal line one-third below the top 
of the escutcheon. 

The Pale. The shield divided by two perpendicular lines, which leave the 
field in three equal parts. 

The Bend. The shield divided by two lines that run from the dexter-chief 
to the sinister-base. 

Bend Sinister. The shield divided by lines running at right angles, and 
forming a cross with perpendicular and horizontal bars. 

The Fesse. The shield divided by two lines running horizontally across the 
field at the honor- and fesse-points. 



30 IIERALDlt ). 



The Saltire. The shield divided by lines running from the sinister and dex- 
ter base- to the sinister and dexter chief-points, forming a cross. 

The Chevron. The shield divided by rafters, which rest at the dexter and 
sinister naval-points, and unite at the middle chief-point. 

The Border. The shield divided by a line running inside of the border lines 
of the field, representing a smaller escutcheon of the same form. 

The Orle. Lines that describe the form of a bow in the center of the field 
with cross-top. 

The Pretence. A small shield in the center of the large one, on which the 
wife's arms are emblazoned. 

The Quarter. Liues running from the top and side of the shield, and meet- 
ing in the center so as to cut one quarter from the dexter chief. 

The Canton. Lines that cut out the dexter corner of the shield, upon which 
is sometimes an open hand. 

Checque. Lines running across the shield at right angles, dividing the field 
into checques. 

Billets. Three oblong figures, two in the chief and one in the middle, base- 
point like billets of wood. 

The Paile. Lines running from the middle base-poiut to the dexter and sin- 
ister chief-points, forming the letter Y. 

The Pile. Lines running from the sinister and dexter chief-points to the 
middle base-point, in the form of the letter V, — said to represent the three nails 
of the Saviour's cross, when there are three. 

The Flauxce. Liues running from the sides of the shield in the form of half- 
circles. 

Losexge. Three small diamond-formed figures, sometimes one within the other, 
making a border to each. 

The Fret. A large diamond, whose points nearly reach the sides of the shield, 
crossed by two lines running from sinister and dexter chief-points to sinister 
and dexter base-points. 

Lozengy. Caused by lines crossing each other in diamond-form. 

ARMS OF RIDDELLS, IN SCOTLAND. 

[From the Lyon Office, Edinburgh.] 

George Riddell, Esq., doctor of medicine, heir male, and representative of 
the family of Kiuglass, who was descended of Riddell of that ilk : Bears quar- 
terly, first and fourth argent on a chevron gules, betwixt three ears of rye, 
slipped and bladed vert, a mollet of the field of Riddell. Second and third 
argent, a fess between three bay leaves vert for Foulis, as being descended 
from Foulis of Ravelston by his great-grandmother, who was aunt to Sir John- 
Foulis Primrose of Ravelston and Dunipace, Bart. ; Crest, a demi-greyhound 
argent. Motto, "Right to Share." Matriculated 7th August, 1765. 

James Riddell, Esq., of Riddell-Lodge, in the County of Berwick, and of 
Belton, in the County of Suffolk (descended of the family of Riddell of King- 
lass, by Elizabeth Foulis, aunt to Sir John-Foulis Primrose of Ravelston and 
Dunipace, Bart.; who was descended of Riddell of that ilk), and who married 
Mary, eldest daughter of Thomas Milles, Esq., of Billockby-hall, in the County 
of Norfolk : Bears quarterly, first and fourth argent, on a Chevron invected 
gules, betwixt three ears of Rye slipped and bladed vert: a cross moliue of the 
field for Riddell ; second and third or, a lion passant between three billets 
sable by the name of Milles. Crest, a demi-greyhound argent. Motto, " Right 
to Share." Matriculated 7th August, 1765. 

James Riddell, of Ardnamurchan and Sunart, in the County of Argyle; of 
Mains, in the Stewartry of Kirkcudbright; of Riddell-Lodge, in the County of 



HEBALDBY. 31 



Berwick ; of Castlelaw, iu the County of Mid-Lothian ; of Belton, in the County 
of Suffolk; and of Caister, in the County of Norfolk, esquire. One of His 
Majesty's Justices of the Peace for the Counties of Argyle and Suffolk, LL. D., 
and member of the Society for Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, and Com- 
merce, whose lady was Mary, daughter and heiress of Thomas Milles, of 
Billockby-hall, esquire, iu the County of Norfolk, and who was third son of 
Capt. George Ridded, representative of the family of Kinglass, and Christian 
daughter of Andrew Patterson, of Kirktowu, esquire, which George was eldest 
son of George Riddell, of Kinglass, esquire, and Jean, eldest daughter of Capt. 
John Taillyeour, which last George, who succeeded his elder brother James 
Riddell, of Kinglass, who died without issue, was second son of James Riddell, 
of Kinglass, Commissary General to the Parliament's army in the north in 
the reign of King Charles I, and Elizabeth, daughter of George Foulis, of 
Ravelston, esquire, which last James was only son of James Riddell, the only 
son of Robert Riddell, second son of Walter Riddell, of Riddell, esquire, chief 
of that name in this kingdom, the thirteenth in descent from Geoffrey Riddell, 
who obtained from King David I, these lands in the County of Roxburgh, 
erected on his account into the Barony of Riddell, which Geoffrey was 
grandson of the Sieur Riddell, who was descended from the House of Aujou, 
who vvas one of the noblemen that came from Normandy with William the 
Conqueror, and had a command in his army at the Battle of Hastings, iu the 
year 106C> : Bears quarterly, first and fourth argent, on a chevron invecked 
gules between three ears of rye slipped and bladed proper, a cross Moliue of 
the field for Riddell; second aud third or, a lion passant between three billets 
sable for Milles. Crest, a demi-greyhound argent. Motto : " Right to Share," 
and below the shield, Utile et Dulce. Supporters : On the dexter, a lady, the 
emblem of agriculture, holding iu her right hand the Zodiac, together with 
three stalks of corn, and iu her left, an imperial crown proper; her upper gar- 
ment vert, aud the under one or. On the sinister, the emblem of Honour, 
wreathed about the head with laurel, crested with broom, holding a spear in 
his dexter hand, and a shield in his sinister, whereon are represented two tem- 
ples proper, vested above a white garment with a robe azure, with a chain 
around his neck, and bracelets round his wrists or. Matriculated 7th February, 
1775. 

Sir James-Milles Riddell, of Arduamuichan and Sunart, in the County of 
Argyle, Bart., eldest son and heir of Thomas-Milles Riddell, Esq., and Mrs. 
Margaret Campbell his spouse, which Thomas-Milles was only son of the late 
Sir James Riddell, also of Ardnamurchan, etc., Bart., by his spouse Mary, only 
daughter and heiress of Thomas Milles, of Billockby-hall iu the County of 
Norfolk, esquire : Bears quarterly, first on three piles in point gules, sur- 
mounted by a bend azure ; second quarter counter-quartered, first lozengy or. 
and gules; second gules, three lions rampant or; third gules, two pales vair a 
chief or ; fourth barry of six or, and sable in chief, a label of six points of the 
last. Third grand quarter counter-quartered, first azure, a wolf's head erazed 
argent ; second and third argent, three barry gules ; fourth barry wavy of six, 
or. and gules. Fourth grand quarter or. a lion passant, between three billets 
sable, the badge of a British baronet being placed in the heart-point. Above the 
shield is placed a helmet befitting his degree with a mantling, gules doubled 
argent, and on a wreath of his liveries is set for crest a hand issuing out a 
coronet of an earl of France, holding baton all proper, over which upon an 
exvol is the motto "de Apulia" and beneath the shield upon a compartment 



32 HERALDRY, 



whereon is inscribed utile dulce, are placed for supporters, on the dexter a 
female representing agriculture, habited as the ancient Ceres, holding a plough 
with her right hand and in her left a poppy-seed vessel with ears of wheat and 
rye; and on the sinister an armed knight of the eleventh century representing 
Honour holding a pennon with the red cross of England upon a white field. 

These arms are destined by letters -patent from the Lord Lyon, bearing even 
date with the Matriculation the twenty-second day of April, 1829, to the said 
Sir James-Milles Riddell, Bart., and his heirs, with due and proper differences 
according to the law of Arms, the exterior decoration of supporters and the 
baronet's badge being the distinct ensigns of the said Sir James-Milles Riddell 
and his male representatives. 

ARMS OF VARIOUS HOUSES OF RIDDELL. 

1. Riddell, of Ardnamurchan and Sunart, Scotland. Or, three piles in point 
gu., surmounted by a bend az. Crest, a hand issuing from an earl's coronet 
of France, holding a baton, all ppr. Supporters, dexter, a female, in her ex- 
terior hand three ears of rye ; sinister, a knight in complete armor. Motto, 
" Utile et dulce " (useful and agreeable). This coat was created in 1778, and has 
now many quarteriugs. 

2. Riddell, of Roxburghshire, Scotland. Ar. a chev. gu. betw. three ears 
of rye ppr., slipped vert. Crest, a demi-greyhouud ar. Supporters, two grey- 
hounds ar. Motto, "I hope to share." 

3. Riddell, of Minto, Scotland. Ar. a chev. gu. betw. three ears of rye, 
stalked and slipped vert. Crest, a dexter hand ppr., holding a blade of rye, 
slipped, or. 

4. Riddell, Durham and Newcastle, Northumberland. Ar. a fesse betw. three 
garbs., az. Crest, a demi-lion rampt. erminois, holding betw paws a garb or. 
Another az. 

5. Riddell, Norfolk. Sa. three martletts within a bordure engrailed, ar. 
Crest, a martlett ar. 

6. Riddell, Bedfordshire. Paley of six ar. and gu., a bend sa. 

7. Riddell, "Middlesex. Gu. a lion rampt or within a bordure. indented, ar. 

8. Riddell, Oxfordshire and Gloucestershire. Paley of six, or. and gu. on 
a chief az. three lions, rampt. or. Crest, a talbot's head couped az. garnished 
and ringed or. 

9. Riddell, Felton Park and Swinburn Castle. Arg. a fesse. betw three rye 
sheaves, az. Crest, a demi-lion. couped. or. holding a rye sheaf, az. Motto, 
" Deus solus augot arestas."* 

10. Riddell, Gleu-Riddell, DUmfrieshire, Scotland. Ar. a chev. gu. betw. 
three ears of rye ppr. slipped vert. Crest, a sheaf of rye standing upright ppr.f 

UNDESIGNATED ARMS OF RIDDELLS. 

11. Riddell. Or. on a bend. az. three Catharine wheels ar. 

m 

* According to the appendix of the Carr MS., Thomas Riddell, sheriff of Xe\veastle-on- 
Tyne, 1500 A. D., William Riddell, mayor of that city, 1510 and 1526 A. I)., William Riddell, 
sheriff, 1575 A. D., ami Peter Riddell, sheriff, all bore arms as follows: "Gu. a lion rani- 
pant within a bordure indented arte." Peter, however, bore "a crescent sa. in dexter 
chief, for difference." it will be seen that these differ from the arms of the Riddells of 
Feiiham, and the Scottish families. Jordan Ridel, of Tilmouth, England, L230A. I)., "bore 
rive bars wavy" in his shield. Ridall, or Ridhull (Herts). "Or, on a bend az." 

t For arms of Riddells of Wittering, see pedigree of thai family in i><»ly of lhis book. 



HEBALDBY. 33 



12. Riddell. Sa. ou a fesse betw. three owls ar. five crosses formee of the first. 

13. Riddell. Ar. three piles gu. a quarter sa. 

14. Riddell. Or three piles gu. a bencllet. az. 

15. Riddell. Sa. ou a fesse. betw. three owls. or. as many cross-crosslets 
of the field. 

16. Riddell. Arg. a chev. gu. eugr. betw three ears of rye slipped ppr. 
in chief an open hand. Motto, " Utile et dulce." 

ARMS OF RIDLEYS IN ENGLAND. 

1. Ridley, Heatou Hall, County Northumberland, Bart. Quarterly first and 
fourth, gu. on a chev. betw. three falcons ar. as many pellets, for Ridley; sec- 
ond and third ar. three cocks' heads erased, Sa. for White. Crest, a full pass, 
the tail extended over the back, gu. Motto, " Constance fideo" 

2. Ridley, Ridley Hall, Chester, and Willimoteswick and Walltown, North- 
umberland. Gu. a chev. betw. three goshawks, ar. for Wale, Elias Ridley; 
quarterings ar. an ox pas. gu. through reeds ppr. being the ancient coat of 
Ridley. Crest, a greyhound courant, ar. 

3. Ridley, Atkinton and Linley, County Sallop. Ar. on a mount vert, a bull 
standing, gu. armed or. 

4. Ridley, Parkend, Northumberland. Gu. on a chev. betw. three falcons 
ar. as many pellets. Crest, a bull pass. gu. 

5. Ridley, Shropshire. Gu. a chev. ar. collared gu. 

6. Ridley, Ticket and Westwood, Northumberland and Yorkshire. Ar. a bull 
pass. gu. on a mount vert. 

7. Ridley (as borne by Nicholas Ridley, Bishop of London). Gu. on a chev. 
betw. three falcons close, ar. as many pellets. Crest, a bull pass. gu. 

8. Ridley, County Surrey. Gu. a chev. betw. three birds, ar. 

UNDESIGNATED ARMS OF RIDLEYS. 

9. Ridley. Ar. a chev. sa. betw. three cocks' heads, erased, gu. Crest, on 
a chapeau a salamander in flames ppr. 

10. Ridley, or Redleigh. Gu. a chev. betw. three birds, ar. 

11. Ridley. Gu. a chev. betw. three birds, ar. Crest, a greyhound courant; 
ar. collared, or. 

12. Ridley. Ar. on a mount vert, a bull sa. armed gu. 

13. Ridley. Az. a chev. betw. three falcons ar. armed and jessed or. 

14.- Ridley. Gu. on a chev. ar. betw. three falcons close, or as many pellets. 
Crest, a bull pass. gu. 

15. Redley. Gu. a chev. or. 

1G. Ridler. Same as Ridley of Ticket, Northumberland. 

17. Ridley. Or. surmounted by bend az. with three stars, dexter an open 
hand gu. Crest, a leopard, collared, chained, garnished, ramp. gd. Supporters, 
sinister, a unicorn chained and collared; dexter, a tiger ramp, chained. Motto, 
"Jamais Arriere" (never behind). 

3 



THE ANCIENT NORTHMEN, RIDDELL ANCESTRY. 



The greatest genealogists of England and Scotland have said, " Few 
families have claims to higher antiquity, than that of Ridel, or Riddell, 
and fewer still have such grounds upon which to establish their preten- 
sions ; indeed, the authorities supporting their history, are such as are 
rarely found in tracing the genealogy of our old families, especially at a 
period so remote as that at which theirs commences." As the ancestors 
of this distinguished family made so conspicuous a figure amongst their 
countrymen in the early wars, and were identified with all the fluctua- 
tions and migrations of their race, it seems proper to present a compre- 
hensive sketch of the history of the ancient nation from which they are 
descended. 

The several tribes of Scandinavians dwelling in Denmark, Sweden, and 
Norway, originated on the shores of the German Ocean, and during their 
southern incursions, were called Norsemen, or Northmen, in consequence 
of their coming from the north of Europe. This was a proper name to 
apply to this race while they were united as one kingdom, but after their 
dissolution, the name Norman had reference only to the inhabitants of 
Norway; they are now designated by the several countries in which they 
live, namely, Danes, Swedes, and Norwegians. These ancient sea-kings, 
or vikings, followers of Odin, have a noble history, and their influence 
upon the civilization of Europe has been remarkable. Belonging to the 
German race, they shared the love of liberty, the spirit of activity, and 
the disposition to wander from their native land. They were divided 
into numerous tribes, early acquainted themselves with the art of naviga- 
tion, and were addicted to piracy. From the beginning of the eighth 
century, they commenced to ravage the coasts of various parts of Europe, 
and planted their feet upon the soil of every country within their reach. 
Kings everywhere trembled at the name of the Northmen, and nations 
were almost paralyzed at their approach. To mark the resemblance be- 
tween the ancient national characteristics of the Northmen and their de- 
scendants, representing the ancestry of the Riddell family, we will briefly 
consider their early appearance and habits. They were broad-shouldered, 
deep-chested, long-limbed, with slender waists, and small hands and feet; 
their build told of strength, which was so prized by them that their puny 
infants were exposed and left to die. Their complexion was almost always 
fair, and the fair alone were considered beautiful or well-born. One early 
writer says of the Northman, " His face was large ; his forehead broad, 
with mickle eyebrows; his nose not long, but excessively thick; his upper 
tip wide and long, while his chin ami jaw-bones were enormously broad. 



THE ANCIENT NOBTHMEN, BIDDELL ANCESTBY. 35 

He was thick-necked, and bis shoulders of superhuman breadth. In shape 
well built, and taller than the most of men." 

The ordinary dress of the sexes was nearly the same, — a shirt, loose 
drawers, long hose, high shoes held by thongs twisted about the ankles. 
They wore a short kilt or skirt at the waist, an armless cloak, with low- 
crowned broad-brimmed hat, which completed the costume of the men. 
The underclothing of both sexes was of linen; the outside garments of 
woolen homespun, most prized when dyed blue or red. In time of war 
their chieftains put on a coat of mail, woven of small rings of iron or 
steel, which formed a complete network, and was so flexible — though 
heavy — as to adapt itself to every necessary motion of the body. In 
addition to the coat of mail, the ancient Northmen wore a cowl or corpun- 
chon of the same material, thrown over the head and shoulders; over 
this they placed a conical helmet, made of burnished steel and having a 
neck-piece or visor, which, when closed, completely protected the head 
and face. At the waist they wore a tunic, called by them the " hauberk," 
made of rings of steel, which with the "chausses" or leg pieces made of 
the same material, constituted the complete equipment of the Northman 
soldier. The Northman's shield was long and kite-shaped, having two bands 
for the arm and one for the neck in case they wished to use both hands 
in battle ; these were covered with hard leather, with steel rim and boss, 
white in time of peace and red in time of war ; they were usually orna- 
mented with some fanciful device, but not of an heraldic character. Their 
arms were heavy lances, steel-pointed with an ashen shaft ; battle-axes ; 
and, above all, a broadsword, the darling of the Northmen. Their lances 
were decorated with long ribbon streamers, called by them "gonfalons." 

Norman ships were long, half-decked galleys, propelled both by sails and 
oars. The bow and stern were high, and were ornamented, the former 
with a dragon's head, the latter with the tail, and thus a fleet of these ships 
looked like huge sea-monsters, whose open jaws were ready to crush the foe. 
The sails were gay, with stripes of blue, green, and red. In the prow 
stood the warriors, in the stern their chief, and behind him the helms- 
man. The rowers were protected during action by planks set up along 
the bulwarks, and on the sides of the vessel was a gangway from which 
to board an enemy's ship. 

The character of these hardy Northmen fitted them for the adventure- 
some and warlike destinies of the race. Possessed of an independent, 
haughty, and unyielding disposition, and taught contempt of danger in 
their struggles for existence in a rugged and barren country, they proved 
themselves unconquerable. They were cold-blooded and unmerciful to- 
ward their enemies, and, as one has said, "hard-featured when angry." 
All these qualities were common to ancient conquerors, but were de- 
veloped in a peculiar degree by the Northmen in every generation until 
their distinctive habits were lost or modified by the blood of other nations. 

As we follow the Northmen in their migrations and settlements, another 
feature of character is conspicuous, namely, their versatility and power 
of adapting themselves to the various and peculiar conditions of society 
whither they went. They introduced but few new principles, but readily 
assumed the language, religion, and ideas of their adopted country, and 
became absorbed in the society around them ; this rule holds good with 
the exception of Iceland, where they largely predominated over the in- 
habitants who preceded them. But not so in resjject to their influence 
upon the nations amongst whom they settled, for invariably they became 



36 THE ANCIENT NOBTHMEN, UIDDELL ANCESTBY. 



the master-spirits of the age, and deeply affected those with whom they 
came in contact ; they inspired an increased activity, and rapidly devel- 
oped institutions of literature and art ; they invented nothing, but perfected 
and organized everything; all nations where the spirit of the Northmen 
has been introduced", have reached the highesl degrees of prosperity under 
their moulding power. 

As early as the end of the eighth century the Northmen had discovered 
and settled the Shetland and Orkney Islands, on the north coast of Scot- 
land. These were subject to the kings of Norway and Denmark, but 
under the independent government of earls, till the' year 14»'>s. While a 
part of the Northmen were taking possession of the Western Islands, 
others were moving south and ravaging the coast of France. 

Rollo, or Rolf, one of the most famous chieftains of the Northmen, 
formerly an Earl of Shetland and Orkney, followed by a large number of 
his countrymen, made an incursion into France, and in the year 885 
marched against Rouen, and subjugated everything in his way. Rollo 
was a great warrior and statesman. He was surnamed the Ganger, or 
Walker, because he was too tall and heavy for any horse to bear. He 
followed the calling of a viking for fortv years before his conquests in 
France and settlement at Rouen. He continued his devastating move- 
ments until he was granted by treaty in the year 911 the whole province 
on the west coast of France, which he called Normandy, or "the land of 
the Northmen," otherwise the Duchy of Normandy, of which Rollo was 
the first duke. He also married Gisela, the daughter of the king of 
France, embraced Christianity, was baptised, and settled down at Rouen, 
the capital of Normandy. The province was now divided into counties, 
and subdivided into earldoms, and the lands bestowed upon the country- 
men who had served Rollo, the duke, in his wars. Rollo continued to en- 
large his hold in France by the frequent accession of new territory until 
the time of his death in 932, when his body was entombed in the chapel 
of St. Romanus at Rouen. He was about eighty years of age. 

During all the years through which we have traced the Northmen, rep- 
resentatives of the Ridel, or Rid dell, family were acting with them, and 
accompanied them in all their migrations; indeed, their names appear con- 
temporary with the earliest date of the Norman settlement in France, and 
always associated with some important movement. 

According to the writings of Playfair, Gaulter de Ridel followed Canute, 
or Cnut, the Danish king of England, on his pilgrimage to Rome, in the 
year 1025. He took with him two sons, — Oscital and Gaufrid, and the 
latter having entered into the service of Rollo,* Duke of Normandy, 
founded a family at Rouen ; the descendants of which continued there in 
affluence till the Revolution of France. Oscital, or Anskitel, as the name 
was sometimes spelt, returned to Scotland, and became the head of the 
Ridel, or Ridale, family there. 

In the conquest of Sicily, about 1060, by the Normans, two brothers 
Ridel accompanied their fellow-countrymen, and were afterwards found in 
distinguished positions. Goffridus Elide! figured there as Duke of Gaeta, 
as early as the year 1072 ; and his brother Rignaldus, a- Count de Ponte Car- 
vo, in 1093. John Riddell, Esq., the learned and distinguished antiquary 
of Scotland, found in Norman records proof of the existence of Gulfridus 

♦According to the date given above, there mast have been two Norman Dukes 
named Rollo, a< the first died in 932 A. 1). 



THE ANCIENT NORTHMEN, RLDDELL ANCESTRY. 37 

and Roger Ridel, in possession of estates in Normandy, in the thirteenth 
century; and also two great branches in France, classed among its mag- 
nates there, and allied by marriage with many distinguished families, de- 
nominated " Riddells of Baijerae," which terminated in heirs female. 

In the absence of records, many of which were destroyed during the 
Norman wars, it is impossible to discover the dates when lands were be- 
stowed upon the Ridels in the various provinces in France ; but we know 
they held the earldoms of Angoulesme, Piragord, and Agen, as early as 
885 ; the latter, as will hereafter appear, having been acquired by the 
marriage of Walgrinus Ridel with Rosalinda. The son and successor of 
Walgrinus rebuilt the walls of the city of Angoulesme as a defence 
against the Normans. A family of Ridels also inherited the baronies of 
Montausier and Blaye, in the province of Guinne ; another family were 
barons of Bergerac in Piragord ; another branch held the barony of Rilley in 
Touraine ; another became possessed of lands in Nogent and Aurillac, in 
Champagne in France. At what time the Ridels of France acquired the 
lands called Ryedale, I cannot tell ; but it was evidently about the date 
of the conquest of Apulia, say 1050, for Galfridus Ridel had assisted the 
Normans in the reduction of this province, and was endowed with valu- 
able lands there as a reward for his valor, and also granted the coat-of- 
arms which has the motto, " de Apulia," and in the hand of the woman 
supporting the shield are three ears of rye, hence, I suppose Ryedale was 
the seat of Galfridus and his successors as long as they held this property; 
and as this same cadet of the family assisted his countrymen as followers 
of William the Conqueror, in the conquest of England, and was well re- 
warded with valuable grants of land in that country when William was 
crowned king, it may be presumed, with plausibility, that Ryedale in 
Yorkshire constituted a part of those lands bestowed by the Conqueror, 
and were named for the seat of this branch of the family in France. The 
records in the Lyon Office of Scotland, however, state that the Galfridus 
who came with the Conqueror, had a command in the Norman army, and 
that he belonged to the family styled "Riddels of Anjou." His name on 
the roll of Battle Abbey is Sieur Ridel. 

The history of the Norman Ridels in England is of a meagre and some- 
what obscure character. From what proof we have at hand, they seem to 
have held high and prosperous positions under the Norman kings, and were 
in unbroken communication with their kinspeople in France ; indeed, it 
seems evident that Monsieur de Ridel, who followed the Conqueror to 
England, returned soon after to look after his property in Normandy, and 
sent over his sons to settle on the lands granted him in England. One 
of this family formed an alliance with the noble house of Bassett by mar- 
riage ; and another wedded Geva, the beautiful and accomplished daughter 
of the Earl of Chester, one of whose descendants, Maud, or Matilda, Avas 
the wife of David, Earl of Huntingdon, and became the maternal ances- 
trix of Robert Bruce, King of Scotland. It is not known how many 
generations of the Ridels continued the residence in England; but the 
same family held landed estates in Normandy, England, and Scotland at 
the same time, as will be seen hereafter in the genealogy. Those were 
times of constant fluctuation, and lands were sometimes quickly gained 
and as soon lost, by the changes resulting from the Norman wars. 

Branches of the Norman stock of Ridel settled early in Italy and Ger- 
many, where their descendants have continued ever since, evidently mul- 
tiplying with every generation, while several of the branch families of 



38 THE ANCIENT NORTHMEN BIDDELL ANCESTRY. 

France ended in the male line and lost the name. Nearly all genealogical 
writers have commenced the history of the Scottish branch of the Nor- 
man family of Ridel with the early ancestors of the Roxburghshire Ri- 
dales, but cadets of the family held lands in Scotland at an earlier date, 
as will be seen in the genealogical departments of this book. Cranstown, 
subsequently known as " Cranstown-Riddell," was in the possession of the 
Norman Riddells with little intermission for about two centuries, and was 
probably granted about A. D. 1100. One authority says Oscital Ridel, 
having finished his pilgrimage to Rome, returned to his native land by 
consent of King Malcolm Canmore, and gave his lands of Cranstown, 
Preston, and others, to his son Hugo, who in the year 1110 bestowed 
the church of Cranstown and certain lands in the barony upon the mon- 
astery of Selkirk, which was founded by King David. 

Sir Walter Scott, in a very complimentary note in his poem on Dole- 
raine, has made an attempt to prove that the Roxburgh Ridales were 
established in Scotland at a period far more remote than those of Crans- 
town, but his conjectures cannot be sustained by any good authority, and 
are ignored bv the best-informed of the familv in Scotland. He mentions 
two stone coffins found in an ancient vault of the old church in the parish 
of Lilliesleaf, which contained the remains of men of gigantic size, and bear- 
ing date as early as A. D. 727 and A. D. 936. Scott also mentions the 
date 1110 as found in the aisle of the ancient church of the Ridales of 
Roxburgh, but the late Walter Riddell-Carre says in a communication to 
the author, " There are memorials cut in the south wall, but they are not 
of a sufficiently antiquated character, to represent a period so far back, 
though they may have been recut in modern times, a not unfrequent pro- 
cess employed to preserve dates nearly defaced by time." 

When David I, Prince of Cumberland, who was a great colonizer, went 
into Scotland he was followed by several cadets of the family of England, 
one of whom, Gervase, or Geoffery Ridale, was a great favorite of King 
David, being the first High Sheriff of the county and a constant attend- 
ant on royalty, as proven by many crown-charters to which he was a wit- 
ness ; one of the mosf ancient charters witnessed by this man was the 
celebrated " Inquisito Principis Davidis" which was dated A. D. 1116. 
Walter Ridale, a brother of the preceding, was also a witness to crown 
and other charters; but that to himself granted by King David, eclipsed 
them all, being the most ancient charter known from a king to a layman. 
This document, dated A. D. 1125, granted an estate including lands called 
Whittun, near the Cheviot Hills, to be held of the crown. These lands 
were subsequently denominated the "Barony of Riddel! and Whittun." 
This charter styles Walter Ridale "sheriff" and confirms to him all the 
lands of which his brother Gervase died possessed. 

Besides the charter before mentioned, the early ancestors of the Rox- 
burgh family had two bulls; one from Pope Adrian IV, dated A. D. 1155, 
and another from Pope Alexander III, dated A. D. 1160, which Mr. Nis- 
bit, the well-known Scottish herald and antiquary saw, confirming to the 
Ridales the lands received by charter from King David I, and other estates 
not mentioned in that document. It is somewhat remarkable that these 
fands were held in unbroken succession by the family for nearly seven hun- 
dred years without an entail ; quite long enough to warrant Sir Walter 
Scott in using the name of "ancient Riddell's fair domain." In a statement 
from Walter Riddell-Carre, he says, " There are two things that present 
themselves in a survey of the history of this family which seem remark- 



THE ANCIENT NORTHMEN, RWDELL ANCESTRY. 30 

able; on the one hand, the singular good fortune attending them in main- 
taining the possession of their estates in direct succession for upwards of 
six centuries ; on the other hand, that having never fallen lower, they 
did not rise higher in the scale. Many names once famous have passed 
away, and their lands, once called by their names, have gone into other 
families, but Riddell after Riddell, of that ilk, followed each other, and 
there was never wanting one to transmit the name and honors of the race. 
Why, it may be asked, did they not, during that long time, climb to higher 
positions, continuing only barons, knights, and gentlemen, while many 
less pretentious of antiquity, secured patents of nobility? One explana- 
tion may suffice; they held their lands by being contented with an honor- 
able and safe level. 

" Medio tutissiman ibis. 

" Ambition has not unfrequently hurled headlong those who were deter- 
mined to ascend higher than a wise Providence intended ; while during 
the stormy mediaeval times many of the Scottish nobles and families of sta- 
tion tarnished their names by acts of violence and treason, no such stain 
attaches to the Riddells ; they enjoyed the favor and regard of their sov- 
ereigns under whom they lived, receiving knighthood at their hands, and 
were granted valuable lands as a reward for services faithfully performed. 
But they had higher distinctions than mere worldly ones. In those days, 
when to give lands to the church for the service of God was thought to 
be a pious work, the Riddells were no niggards of their property, and in 
after times when their religious faith caused them to suffer for ' conscience' 
sake ' they were ready for prison or banishment." 

This prestige has clung to the family from generation to generation, 
passing unimpaired and unsullied from father to son, from their earliest 
history. The Roxburgh Riddells seem to have built a castle on their lands, 
and also a church, the former a place of great strength, but long since in 
ruins, and now only the earthworks can be seen. A stone was found some 
yeai-s ago near the present mansion, on which were cut the Riddell arms, 
connected with those of the Kerrs, proving a very early alliance with that 
historical family, — say four hundred years ago. The chapel built by this 
family was a pre-reformation one, but the date of its erection cannot now 
be certainly known. Scott mentions the demolition of an ancient church 
at the time when the stone coffins, before mentioned, were found ; but 
clear documentary proofs are wanting. It is evident that the early gen- 
erations of the family were buried there, as bones have frequently been 
dug up on the ground where the chapel stood. 

The Norman Ridels inherited the national roaming disposition and love 
of adventure, and consequently we find them engaged with their country- 
men in all their wars and conquests ; which may account for the fact that 
representatives of the family are found in every country newly acquired 
by Norman arms, and always as possessed of landed property. Other 
members of the Norman stock were early in Scotland, being well allied 
by marriage, and owning extensive lands ; some of these lost their hold- 
ings and removed to other parts, while some established and distinct fam- 
ilies are still represented in the west of Scotland, denominated "Riddells 
of Ardnamurchan and Sunart." 

The Riddells of Ireland, whose history I will now follow, are nearly all 
of Scottish origin, offshoots of the ancient families so long known in the 
latter country. There were some, however, who evidently went to Ireland 



40 THE ANCIENT NORTHMEN, UIDDELL ANCESTBT. 

contemporary with their earliest settlements in England and Scotland, 
but whether from those branch-families or cadets of some of the houses 
of France, cannot be determined now with certainty. The first mention 
of the Riddell name found in Ireland is in a pamphlet published at Down- 
patrick in 184*2, which is entitled, "Notices of the Most Important Events 
Connected with the County of Down." In this book there is an account 
of the first settlement of the English in Ulster under Sir John de Courcy, 
dated A. D. 1177, and among the names of families that were settled in 
the province at that time were Savages, Whites, Benson s, and Riddells. 
It cannot be known whether this family continued as residents of Ireland, 
but it may be presumed that they were only nominal possessors, as none 
of the more recent families in that country can be traced to so remote a 
period in settlement. There is abundant evidence to prove that members 
of the family from England and Scotland held commissions in Ireland at 
a date long anterior to the colonization of Ulster by the Scottish Pres- 
byterians, but no evidence to show that these men were permanently dom- 
iciled there. 

In the year 1603 King James commenced the undertaking of settling 
six counties in the Province of Ulster, in the north of Ireland, with Scot- 
tish subjects. James had been successful in crushing the Irish rebellion, 
and having confiscated two million acres of land, conceived the idea of 
sending his own countrymen to settle and occupy the newly acquired pos- 
session. It was some time, however, before he could successfully execute 
the plan, as the Scotch people did not view the project with favor and 
were unwilling to move their families into Ireland. But inducements of 
such a character were eventually held out by the government that a small 
colony emigrated from the northwest coast of Scotland in 161:2 and 
planted themselves in Ulster ; these were Presbyterian families from the 
County of Argyle, and it is very probable that families of Rid dells accom- 
panied their countrymen to the new r settlement. During the following 
twenty years many ministers with their congregations crossed the Channel 
and established themselves in the Province of Ulster; from these new 
tributaries from Scotland the colony began to flourish, and the ratio of 
migration was augmented to such an extent that in a few years many 
hundred families were scattered through the north of Ireland. 

This intrusion of Scottish subjects upon their confiscated lands excited 
intense hatred in the Catholic Irish; and those who had been ruined in 
their estates in the wars of King James only waited a favorable time to 
make an attempt to recover what they had lost, and rid their country of 
their Presbyterian neighbors. The Irish not only hated the king, but all 
his subjects from Scotland, especially those who were known to have 
taken part in the wars. As was customary in those days, James rewarded 
his soldiers with grants of land in Ulster, and among that number were 
three brothers, namely, Hugh, James, and Robert Riddell, presumably de- 
scended from the Roxburghshire family, or some of its numerous branches 
in Scotland, but possibly of the " Etiddells of Kinglass," a distinct family. 
Of these brothers, James was an officer of rank in the army of King 
James, and all three had fought from principle as Presbyterians through 
the wars. James Riddell had a grant of land (three townlands) in the 
County of Armagh, in the Province of Ulster ; Hugh Riddell received a 
grant bordering on the Counties of Tyrone and Donegal, not far from 
that of his brother before mentioned; while Roberl Riddell, the third 
brother, settled on land further south near the city of Dublin. From 



THE ANCIENT NORTHMEN, RIDDELL ANCESTRY. 41 

these three brothers it seems probable that nearly all of the Scotch-Irish 
Riddells have sprung. Political troubles drove other families of the 
Scottish Riddells into Ireland at different times, and it is now a well- 
established fact that some of these were from the branch of the Rox- 
burghshire house denominated "Riddells of Glen-Riddell," in Dumfrie- 
shire, and their descendants are still in the city of Belfast. 

In many i-espects the settlement of these devoted Presbyterians in Ire- 
land was a misfortune ; there could be no peace between them and the 
Catholic Irish. A conspiracy was raised in 1641, which aimed at the com- 
plete extermination of the Protestant population of Ireland ; and it so 
far succeeded that forty thousand were suddenly massacred in different 
parts of the island. A contemporary writer states as follows: "No con- 
dition, no age, no sex, was spared. But death was the slightest punish- 
ment inflicted by the rebels ; all the tortures which wanton cruelty could 
devise, all the lingering pains of body, the anguish of mind, and the ago- 
nies of despair, could not satiate the revenge of the Irish." This rebellion 
continued until 1649, when Cromwell avenged the blood of the slaugh- 
tered saints and crushed the insurrection. 

After the Restoration in the year 1660, James, a brother of King Charles, 
was appointed Viceroy of Scotland, and being a bigoted Roman Catholic, 
the Scottish Presbyterians were the objects of his hatred and persecu- 
tion. An old writer says, "He let loose upon the Protestants the dogs 
of war and drove hundreds of them into exile ; large numbers escaped to 
Ireland and joined the remnant of their brethren who had preceded them." 
Still, there was no peace, liberty, or safety, for these Presbyterians so long 
as the laws and inhabitants around them were hostile to the principles 
which they loved dearer than life itself. 

Such constancy, steadfastness, and perseverance, as was exhibited by 
these Scotch people in endeavoring to maintain a footing upon the soil of 
their adopted country, has seldom if ever been witnessed, but their suffer- 
ings availed but little. They held the troops of James in check, while 
they defended the last stronghold of King William in Ireland; at London- 
derry and at Boyne-water they poured out their blood most freely ; they 
suffered every hardship and endured the most severe deprivations for the 
sake of their religious faith and the protection of their homes, but they 
were doomed to disappointment under the bloody policy of their enemies. 
The Rev. David H. Riddle has said of these Protestants, " My forefathers 
were Scotch Presbyterians, and fought side by side in the 'Logan forces,' 
and suffered together at Derry, and Enniskillen, and in the revolutionary 
struggles, and their cherished memories go back to Ulster and Boyne- 
water, Donegal and Coleraine." From a communication received from 
Scotland I make the following extract, which was copied from some old 
book : " Among the families from Scotland who suffered at the siege of 
Londonderry, were Hamiltons, Morrisons, Pattersons, Grahames, Watsons, 
Murrays, and Riddels." From another letter written from Ireland in the 
year 1727, we learn that "Londonderry* was besieged nearly half a 

* Londonderry was founded on the site of ancient Deny, which was burned in 
1608, on account of its resistance to the authority of King James I. The site was 
made over to the corporation of London, and the new city of Londonderry became 
the stronghold of Protestantism. In December, 1688, its gates were closed against 
King James II, who laid siege to it April 18, 1689 The siege kept up one hundred 
and live days, when a man-of-war and two ships loaded with provisions ran past 
the batteries and relieved the starving inhabitants. 



42 THE ANCIENT NORTHMEN. I; ID DELL ANCESTRY. 

year (1689) by the army of King James, Avhen he had all Ireland sub- 
dued but Derry and a little place hard by. The besieged defended 
themselves, being Presbyterians, till they were so pinched with hunger 
that a dog's head was sold cheap enough at half a crown; and yet 
God sustained them until King William sent them relief by two ships, 
with men and provisions from England, at which sight, before the ships 
got up to the city and landed their men, the besiegers moved their cainj. 
and fled to the west of Ireland, where afterwards two bloody battles were 
fought and the papists subdued." When every hope of enjoying the lib- 
erty of worship and the unmolested possession of their lands had per- 
ished, these devoted Christians turned their faces toward the American 
Colonies, that they might find an asylum where they could enjoy the peace- 
ful service of God undisturbed; they left the homes granted their fathers 
for service in the army, and the graves of their sires, to brave the dangers 
of the ocean and the wilderness of a foreign land, in search of a spot 
where they could act according to the dictates of conscience and secure 
a living for their families. 

From the year 1680 the Scotch-Irish Presbyterians commenced to sell 
their lands or forsake them, and take ship for America ; as their oppres- 
sions became more intolerable the ratio of emigration increased, until 
thousands of families were scattered through the Carolinas, Virginia, 
Maryland, and Pennsylvania; and early in the eighteenth century several 
ship-loads came to New England. As soon as the first families had 
settled their lands in this country they forwarded letters to their kin- 
dred in Ireland, describing the fertility of the soil and the beauties of 
the American forests, lakes, and streams in such glowing colors that in a 
few years many townships were taken up and settled by Scotch-Irish. 
Among these came many of the Riddell family, which had been very 
prolific in Ireland. These early settled in the South, in the middle 
States, and some in New England. I find the name in New York, New 
Jersey, and Virginia, as early as 1650 ; but by far the greatest number 
came over between 1780 and 1800, influenced by the Irish Rebellion. 
There were also families of Riddells from Scotland and England, who 
settled in the southern States quite early; some of these came in their 
own vessels, bringing with them their cattle, implements of husbandry, 
furniture, and silver-plate, being families of abundant means. There 
were one or more families that came direct to Virginia from France, 
and spelled the name for two generations Riddelle. Others came from 
Germany and settled in Maryland and New York. 

Numbered among the Scdtcji-Irish who first came to New England, 
were three clergymen of the Presbyterian faith, Rev. James Macgreggor, 
Rev. William Boyd, and Rev. William Cornwall, who with their congre- 
gations left the north of Ireland in 1718. These embarked in live ships, 
and about one hundred families arrived in Boston harbor, while twenty 
families with their pastor, Mr. Cornwall, landed at Portland, where they 
remained through the winter and suffered extremely from cold and for 
food. Some unknown poet has commemorated their arrival in the follow- 
ing lines : — 

" In the summer, one thousand seven hundred eighteen, 
Our pious ancestors embarked on i he ocean ; 
Oppressed by the minions and dupes of their king, 
They quitted sweet Erin with painful emotion. 
On the wide swelling wave, 
All danger they brave, 



THE ANCIENT NOBTHMEN, BIDDELL ANCESTBY. 43 

While fleeing from shackles prepar'd for the slave, 
In quest of a region where genius might roam, 
And yield an asylum as dear as their home. 

Undaunted they press'd to their prime destination, 
Allured by the prospects that Freedom display'd, 
And such was the warmth of their fond expectation. 
That clangers unnumbered ne'er made them afraid. 
How serene was that day, 
And how cheerful and gay 
Were those pilgrims when anchored in old Casco Bay ; 
Their prayers then like incense ascended on high, 
And fond acclamations then burst to the sky." 

In the spring of 1719 these families sailed to Portsmouth, solicited 
grants of land, and had leave from the Massachusetts Assembly to look 
out a tract six miles square in any of the unoccupied territory along the 
coast, between the Piscataqua River and Casco Bay. They did not all 
settle in one township, as might have been desired, — probably in conse- 
quence of finding the land taken up by others, — but scattered along the 
sea-shore, in what is now the towns of Kittery, Wells, York, Saco, Scar- 
borough, and Falmouth ; sixteen families not finding a place for settle- 
ment to please them, went to Nuffield, in New Hampshire, and sat down 
there. Belknap says, "These were men principally in middle life, robust, 
persevering, and adventuresome ; such as were well suited to encounter 
the toils and endure- the hardships and self-denials of commencing a new 
settlement. Beinu" industrious and frugal in their habits of life, and being 
highly favored with the Gospel, they soon became a thriving, wealthy, and 
respectable settlement." They had sufficient property to enable them to 
build comfortable houses and profitably cultivate the soil. They intro- 
duced the manufacture of linen into the New England Colonies, having 
taken their "little wheels" with them from Ireland. These were the 
celebrated Scotch-Irish, — not semi-Irish, or mixed Scotch people, but 
real, clean-blooded Caledonians ; who themselves, or their immediate an- 
cestors, had first come from the "bonnie braes " or the "heather hills" of 
Scotland, to dwell in the north of Ireland, but who had now removed to 
America. Nothing was more offensive to these emigrants than to be called 
Irish. Macgreggor writes in 1820, "We are surprised to hear ourselves 
called Irish people, when we so frequently ventured our all for the British 
Crown and liberties against the Irish papists, and gave all tests of our 
loyalty which the government of England required, and are always ready 
to do the same when demanded." The Rev. David H. Riddle once said in 
an address, " We glory in our Scotch-Irish descent. Why ? I can point 
you to the very spot on the map of old Ireland, — parish of Ray, Donegal 
County, — whence my grandfather emigrated to the ancient County of 
York, Pa., and just alongside where the grandfathers and mothers of 
some now separated, lived and worshipped, wept and prayed together!" 
These words represent the universal spirit of the Scotch-Irish in every part 
of the world, — they were never ashamed to own their origin or their re- 
ligious principles. 

Inheriting the characteristics of their ancient Norman ancestors, the 
Scottish and Scotch-Irish people have laid the foundation for civil and 
religious prosperity everywhere they have settled. Bold, adventuresome, 
and persevering; of tenacious, unyielding disposition; blunt, direct, and 
outspoken ; active-spirited, sound in judgment, and far-seeing in their 
plans; they have been successful in every avocation of life. They have 



44 THE ANCIENT NORTHMEN, HID DELL ANCESTBY. 

impi'essed the influence of their characters upon every institution with 
which they have been identified, developing and applying everything 
that was for the public weal. Descendants of these early families from 
Ireland have filled the most prominent professional and civil positions. 
They have been in congress, — four of the Riddells or Riddles have been 
congressmen; and on the judges' bench, — four of the Riddle family in 
the United States have been judges; they have been college presidents 
and professors, lawyers, physicians, and distinguished clergymen. They 
have been leading spirits in every public enterprise, stimulating to activity 
those around them, and shaping the principles and destinies of men and 
parlies. Naturally conservative, and somewhat cold and stern in appear- 
ance, yet kind of heart and very generous when others were in need of 
their assistance. 

In personal appearance the Riddells and Riddles have perpetuated the 
characteristics of their progenitors in Normandy ; generally speaking 
they have been of "sandy complexion," with blue or gray eyes, and long, 
outstanding brows; foreheads broad and receding; cheek-bones high and 
prominent ; nose large; mouth and chin wide, and face ruddy. Many of 
the first two or three generations were very large-framed, brawny men, and 
their strength almost herculean. They generally have broad shoulders, 
full chests, and long arms ; are compactly built, erect, and graceful of 
carriage. In the military capacity they have been conspicuous, and in 
the active service cool and brave. True soldierly qualities seem to have 
been handed down through all generations in every branch of the family, 
from their Norman ancestors to the present time. From the first men- 
tion of the family under the distinctive surname, beginning with the war- 
fare waged by the Northmen, cadets of this stock have cut a prominent 
figure in all the European and American wars; they were knighted in early 
mediasval times for valorous service in France and Italy, as well as in later 
days in England and Scotland; they have received their medals for faith- 
fulness in engagements while holding commissions in the British army, and 
their names stand upon the rolls at Washington among the most chival- 
rous and brave of our American officers. 

Having presented a comprehensive and succinct history of the family 
from the earliest time down to the present ; having traced them in their 
movements and settlements in the various countries where they have 
been domiciled, and having briefly touched upon the prevailing traits of 
character developed by the race from its origin down to its representatives 
of the present, I must now invite the reader to an examination of the bio- 
graphical and genealogical departments of this book for details and indi- 
vidual characters. 



GENEALOGY AND BIOGRAPHY. 



RIDDELLS OF NORMANDY AND ARDNAMURCHAN. 

Walgrinus Ridel 1 (1), ancestors unknown, styled Prapinquas, or 
relative of Charles the Bald,* King of France and Emperor of Germany, 
in the year 886 was created by that prince, Earl of Angoulesme and P-h4- 
gord. He married Rosalinda, daughter of Bernard, the famous Duke of 
Aquitaine, who died in 806, and was afterwards canonized, and grandson of 
Earl Theodoric, one of the chief captains under Charlemagne. In right 
of Rosalinda, Walgrinus acquired the earldom of Agen. He had issue two 
sons, of whom hereafter. He died in 886, and was succeeded by his eldest 
son. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Aldllill Ridel' 2 (1), eldest son of Walgrinus 1 (1) was born at Angoulesme, 
France, and was named for his paternal uncle, Alduin, the famous abbot 
of St. Denis, and chief minister of France under Louis le Debonnaire. He 
succeeded to the earldom of Angoulesme, and rebuilt the walls of this chief 
city of his principality in order to defend it against the incursions of the 
Normans, who at that time grievously infested the country. He was suc- 
ceeded by his son, of whom more hereafter. 



William Ridel 2 (1), second son of Walgrinus 1 (1), was born at Angou- 
lesme, France, and had for his inheritance the earldoms of Piragord and 
Agen, and became ancestor of the Earls of Piragord, which branch of 
the family was afterwards united to this line, as will soon appear. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

William Ridel 3 (2), son of Alduin 2 (1), was born at Angoulesme, 
France, and succeeded to the earldom of Angoulesme. He was surnamed 
" Lector-ferri," or "Taillefer," that is, "Iron-cutter," which name was 
acquired from his having, in an engagement with the Normans, cloven 
through with one stroke of his sword the body of Storis, their king, 
though clad in iron armor, a feat of strength considered worthy of com- 
memoration in that chivalrous age. He was succeeded by his son in 963. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Arnold Ridel 4 (1), son of William 3 (2), was born at Angoulesme, and 



* Charles the Bald was son of Louis the Debonnaire (the gentle), and grandson 
of Charlemagne. The brothers of Charles were Lothaire, Pepin, and Louis. 



4G SIDDELLS OF XOHMAXDY AND AfiDNAMUtiCHAtf. 



succeeded to that earldom, but becoming - a monk, relinquished that in- 
hrritance to his son in 998. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

Witliani Ridel 5 (3), son of Arnold 4 (1), succeeded to the earldom of 

Angoulcsiiie in 998 A. D. ; married Gerberga, daughter of Gall'ridus I, 
Earl of Anjou, and sister of Folco III, grandfather of Folco IV, great- 
grandfather of Henry II, King of England. This representative of the 
family was a nobleman equally celebrated for his munificence, his valor, and 
his prudence. He made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, and died shortly 
after his return, the eighteenth of the Ides* of April, 1028, leaving two 
sons, who successively became heirs of the earldom, as will afterwards 
appear. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

Aldllill Ridel (2), eldest son of William 5 (3), was born at Angoulesme, 
France, and succeeded to that earldom. He died in 1034 A. D., and was 
succeeded by his brother. 

GalfridllS Ridel 6 (1), second son of William 5 (3), was born at Angou- 
lesme, France, and succeeded his brother before mentioned in 1034 A. U. 
He married Petronilla, daughter and heiress of Manard, surnamed "The 
Rich," Baron of Archiac and Botaville, by whom he had issue five sons. 
He died in 1048. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Folco Ridel 7 (1), eldest son of Galfridus (1), was born at Angoulesme, 
France, and succeeding to that earldom became the ancestor of the earls 
of that line. This branch ended in Isabella, wife of King Johnf of Eng- 
land ; and from her every sovereign who has since sat on the throne of 
England was descended. 

GalfridllS Ridel 7 (2), second son of Galfridus 6 (1), was born at Angou- 
lesme, France, and became ancestor of this line, as the eighth in succession. 
He is sometimes called Geoffery, and is particularly mentioned by the au- 
thor of the lives of the Earls of Angoulesme, as having assumed the sur- 
name, and is described in his account of the issue of Galfridus, his father. 
He had for his inheritance the baronies of Montausier and Blaye, in 
Guinne; the former he seems to have given up to his younger brother, 
afterwards mentioned, who was, in consequence, called Arnold de Mon- 
tausier ; the latter possession he held in the same manner as his father 
had done, when his elder brother, Earl Alduin, was alive. He married 
Agnes, daughter and heiress of Albert II, Earl of Piragord, who de- 
scended, as himself, in the seventh degree, from Walgrinus, the first 

* The Romans made a threefold division of the month into Calends, Nones, and 
Ides. In March, May, July, and October, the Ides fell on the 15th, and in the re- 
maining months on the 13th. 

fKing John (surnamed "Lackland"), horn 24th December, 11G6, was crowned 
27th May, 1199. He was espoused to Alice, eldest daughter and co-heir of Hum- 
bert, Count of Maurien, now Savoy; she died before nuptials, and Johu married 
first, Isabella, daughter and heiress of William, Earl of Gloucester, from whom he 
was divorced; secondly, to Isabella, daughter and heiress of Aymer Taillefer (or 
Ridel), Count of Angoulesme, by whom (who married secondly, Hugh, Lord of 
Lusiguau and Valence, in Poictou, and dying in 1246, was buried at Fonterand) 
he left at his decease at Newark Castle, 19th October, 1216, 1, Henry, his successor; 
2, Richard, born 1209; 3, Joan, married 1221 to Alexander, King of Scotland; 4, 
Eleanor; 5, Isabella, married Frederick II, Emperor of Germany. From this we 
see how the royal family of Europe were connected with the Riddells. 



BIDDELLS OF NORMANDY AND ARDNAMURCHAN 47 

Earl of Angoulesme, who stands at the head of his family. His wife had 
been married to William, Duke of Gascony, but was separated from him 
on account of relationship. He had two sons/and dying in 1075 A. D., 
was succeeded by the eldest. 

Arnold Ridel 7 (2), third son of Galfridus 6 (1), was born at Angoufesme, 
France, and received from his elder brother the barony of Montausier, in 
consequence of which he was called Arnold de Montausier. 

William Ridel 7 (4), fourth son of Galfridus 6 (1), was born at Angou- 
lesm, France, and became bishop of that earldom. He died young and 
was succeeded by his brother, of whom hereafter. 

Ayiliar Ridel 7 (1), fifth son of Galfridus 6 (1), was born at Angoulesme, 
France, and succeeded his brother, before mentioned, as bishop of that 
earldom. 

EIGHTH GENERATION. 

Helias Ridel 8 (1), eldest son of Galfridus 7 (2), was born at Angoulesme, 
and succeeded to the earldom of Piragord ; he also became ancestor of the 
earls named Helias Ridel III, IV, and V, Bosco Ridel II, and of Jordan a 
Ridel, Countess of Piragord, married to Archibald V, Viscount of Coin- 
borne, who became the stock of the succeeding earls. Helias was of the 
Ridels, barons of Bergerac, in Piragord, who all bore, for several genera- 
tions, the Christian name and surname of Helias Ridel. This branch ended 
in Margaret Ridel, who was married to Rignald de Pons, ancestor of the 
once celebrated house of De Pons, in France. 

Galfridus Ridel 8 (3), second son of Galfridus 7 (2), succeeded to his 
father's paternal inheritance of Blaye, in Guinne, and became renowned for 
his warlike exploits. He assisted the Normans in the reduction of Apulia* 
(see coat-of-arms), and William the Conqueror in his expedition against 
England, when he was rewarded (after William was crowned), with large 
landed estates by that prince. His name appears on the roll of Battle 
Abbey as " Monsieur Ridel." He married the sister of Roger Biggot, 
Earl of Norfolk, and died in 1098, leaving four sons, of whom more here- 
after. 

NINTH GENERATION. 

Galfridus Ridel 9 (4), eldest son of Galfridus 8 (3), succeeded his father 
as Earl of Blaye, in Guinne, and became Lord Justiciary of all England, 
the highest office under the crown, in the time of Henry I. He married 
Geva, the daughter of Hugh Lumpus, Earl of Chester (and Geva his first 
wife, daughter of Robert de Buci), nephew to William the Conqueror, by 
whom he had one daughter, his heir. The authority on which he was 
called chief justiciary of England, is that of Huntingdon, in his JEpistlm 
de Mundi Contemptu, one copy of which, however, omits his name. Dug- 
dale mentions him as united with Ralph Basset and others, in a com- 
mission to hear and determine a case relating to the privilege of sanctuary 
in the church of Ripon, and then adds that he succeeded Ralph Basset as 
Justice of England. He came to his death Nov. 25, 1120, with prince 
William, when on his return from Normandy in the " Blanche-Nef," from 
the carelessness of a drunken crew. The sons of King Henry I, William 

* Apulia, in the southeastern part of Italy, was taken possession of by the 
Normans, 1043 A. D. Now named Puglia. Once a province of importance. Now 
the towns are depopulated, industry has disappeared, and commerce, once so 
nourishing, has passed away. Agriculture is in a low condition, and the roads are 
infested with banditti. The people are ignorant and superstitious, but hospitable. 



48 EIDDELLS OF NOBMANDY AND ABDNAMUBCHAN. 



and Richard, and their sister Matilda, with many other persons of dis- 
tinction, were swallowed up in the sea with the crew, soon after leaving 
the port of Harrluer. 

Hugh Ridel 9 (1), second son of Galfridus s (3), was endowed with the 
patrimony of the lands of Farringdon, in Northamptonshire, besides which 
he held the barony of Rilly, in Touraine, in France, and the manor of 
Cranstown, in Scotland. He was ancestor of the " Riddells* of Cranstown- 
Riddell " in Mid-Lothian, Scotland. Another authority supposes him to 
have been a son of Gervacius Rydale, who stands at the head of the "Rid- 
dells of Riddell," in Roxburghshire, Scotland. The Cranstown Riddells 
were a distinguished, knightly, and baronial family, and gave their name to 
their lands at a far earlier date than the Roxburgh branch. The barony 
of Cranstownt was held of the crown by the descendants of Hugh. In a 
little more than two centuries they became extinct in the male line, and 
the heir of the last proprietor, dead in 1357, was the wife of John Murray. 
One writer says, " Oscital Ridal having returned to his native land by 
consent of King Malcolm Canmore, gave his lands of Cranstown, Preston, 
and others, to his son Hugo, who in the year 1110 bestowed the church of 
Cranstown, and certain lands in the barony, to the monastery of Selkirk, 
which was founded by Prince David." I shall not separate the " Riddells 
of Cranstown-Riddell" from the family now under notice. 

Philip Ridel 9 (1), third son of Galfridus s (3), had one son who be- 
came head of the family of " Riddells of Riddell," in Roxburghshire, Scot- 
laud (which see), one who entered the church and was canonized, and 
another who became Baron of Varcillac, in Guinne, who also entered the 
church. 

Matthias Ridel 9 (1), fourth son of Galfridus 8 (3), was made abbot of 
Peterborough monastery, A. D. 1102 (or, as one writer says, in 1105 A. D.), 
by King Henry I. Matthias appears to have made a conveyance of the 
manor of Pithesle to his brother, the Justiciary of England, before men- 
tioned. He held the abbacy but a year, dying on the twelfth of the calends 
of November, the very day twelve months from his entrance. After his 
death the king again seized upon the monastery, and held it three years. 

* Riddell, a baronial (Norman) name derived from a Gothic race in Aquitaine, 
France. Gerard, Baron of Blaye, 1030, granted lands to the Abbey of Fons Dulcis, 
near Bordeaux, which grant was confirmed by his brother Gerald de Blaye, and his 
sons Geoffry Rudelli (Ridel), and William Frehelandus (or Ridel) ; the last named, 
who was living 1079-1099, married a sister of William de Albini Brito of England, 
and had sons, Warm, Oliver, and Geoffry; the latter went to Scotland with King 
David, received grants of laud there, and became ancestor of the Riddells of Ridell 
in Roxburghshire. 

Another Geoffry Ridel, of the preceding generation, came to England from 
Apulia with William Bigod (or Bigot), to assist William the Conqueror, ami is 
mentioned in Domesday Book, 1086. He was Crown commissioner with Ralph 
Basset, 1106, aud succeeded that justiciary, 1120. A collateral branch of this family 
possessed lands in Normandy, 1165; Geoffrey Ridel occurs in Normandy, 1180; 
Roger, 1195; Geoffrey, 1198. This note was taken from a book entitled " The Nor- 
man People." 

t Cranstown-Riddell was acquired by the family of Macgills, in 1561. Sir James 
Macgill, of Cranstown-Riddell, was created a baronet in 1619, and in 1651, a peer by 
the title of Viscount Oxenford. The title became extinct at the death of Robert, 
second Viscount, and the land descended by marriage to Sir John Dalrymple of 
Cousland, and Fala, whose family succeeded to the earldom of Stair in 1841. and 
Cranstown-Riddoll is still the property of that family. John Dodds is the present 
factor at Cranstown-Riddell. There is no mansion on the estate now, only a factor's 
house. 



RIDDELLS OF NORMANDY AND ARDNAMURCHAN. 49 

TENTH GENERATION. 

Matilda Ridel 10 (1), only child of Galfridus 9 (4), married to Richard 
Basset, Lord Justiciary of England to King Henry I. He was of an an- 
cient and noble family, being the son of Ralph Basset, Lord Justiciary of 
England, grandson of Thurstine, who came over with William the Con- 
queror, great-grandson of Hugh Basset, who lived in the end of the tenth 
century. Matilda and her husband founded the Abbey of Laud, in Lei- 
cestershire. The issue of this marriage was four sons, the eldest of whom, 
in honor of his mother, assumed the name of Ridel, and carried on that 
family. Ralph, the second son, became ancestor of the Bassets of Dray- 
ton, peers of the realm ; this branch ended in heirs female, married into 
the family of Beauchamp, Earls of Warwick, the Earls of Stafford, and 
the Chaworths. The third son, William, became ancestor of the Bassets 
of Sapcote, peers of the realm, which branch ended in heirs female about 
the time of that of Drayton, — the end of the fourteenth century. An 
account of the fourth son hereafter. Matilda succeeded in 1139 A. D. 



Riguald Ridel 1 ' 1 (1), a son of Hugh 9 (1) succeeded to his father's es- 
tates, and left one son, his heir, of whom hereafter. 

ELEVENTH GENERATION. 

Galfridus Ridel 11 (5), eldest son of Matilda 10 (1), born at Blaye, 
France, in 1129, assumed the surname of Ridel and became the represent- 
ative of that family, being the twelfth in order of succession. He was 
Baron of Blaye, in France, and held fifteen knights' fees in England of 
the king, in capite, being lands in Normandy and others in England, as 
a feudatory. He was one of the chaplains of King Henry II, and was so 
much in the royal favor, that after Thomas a-Becket was elevated to the 
primacy of Canterbury, he was appointed his successor as archdeacon of 
Canterbury, 1162. He was induced to take holy orders by the king's en- 
treaties, as his support against the machinations of Becket, who used to 
declare that his greatest enemy on earth was Galfridus Ridel, and also to 
give him on that account, the name of " Archdevil of Canterbury." He 
was employed still at court, for his name stands second of the "Assidentes 
Justicice Regis,'''' before whom, in 1165, a charter between the abbots of 
St. Albans and Westminster was executed in the Exchequer. He was 
sent with John of Oxford, in 1164, to the pope, to obtain his confirmation 
of the ancient customs and dignities of the realm; and again, in 1169, 
he was one of the ambassadors to the court of France, with the king's 
request that Becket, who had withdrawn there, might not be permitted 
to remain. Both embassies were unsuccessful, but his activity in the 
king's behalf was not allowed to pass unnoticed. The irritated primate 
included him in the excommunication which he pronounced in 1169, 
against several of the bishops and chief men of the kingdom, and in an- 
nouncing the sentence to the bishop of Hereford, he designated Galfridus 
an "archdevil." On Henry's remonstrance, however, the pope's nuncios 
found it necessary to absolve him before the end of the year, he being 
one of those who personally attended the king. Galfridus' favor increased 
at court with Becket's oppression, and accordingly, in the same year of 
the death of the bishop, the See of Ely was placed in his hands and so re- 
mained about four years. In 1173 the bishopric was given him, but he 
was not admitted to it until he had given his solemn protestation in the 
4 



50 BIDDELLS OF NOBMANDY AND ABDNAMUBCHAN. 

Chapel of St. Catherine, in Westminster, that he had in no way, know- 
ingly- been accessory to the murder of the archbishop, an accusation not 
unnaturally made againsl him, from the active part he was known to have 
taken in the king's proceedings. He was then solemnly enthroned, hut 
his consecration did not take place, the See of Canterbury being vacant, 
until October, 1174. 

On the retiremenl of Richard de Luci, in 1179, Bishop Galfridus was 
appointed, with the Bishops of Winchester and Norwich, to lill the office 
of Chief Justiciary, and on the division of the kingdom by the Council 
of Windsor into four judicial circuits, these prelates were respectively 
placed at the head of three of them. They were superseded the following 
year, but Galfridus appears to have acted subsequently in court, as he was 
one of the justices before whom a fine was levied in 1182. In the roll of 
Richard I, his pleas are recorded as a justice itinerant in no less than live 
counties. As, however, he died Aug. '21, 1189, in the interval between 
the death of Kino- Henry and the coronation of Kino- Richard, which 
took place within thirteen days of Galfridus' death, that monarch, finding 
that he had died intestate, appropriated to the expense of the ceremony 
the treasures he found in his coffers, amounting to three thousand and 
sixty silver marks, and two hundred and five golden ones, no very vast ac- 
cumulation after ruling so rich a diocese for nearly fifteen years. He had, 
how ever, devoted a large sum during his life to the improvement of his 
cathedral and the erection of the two towers from the foundation. The 
cognomen, superbus, which he acquired, is stated to have been given from 
the arrogance of his disposition and his want of affability. The his- 
tory of Ely relates that his tomb was violated, and that his successor, 
William de Longchamp, on the day of his enthronization, ascended the 
pulpit, and with the other bishops present, excommunicated all those who 
had committed the sacrilege, or consented thereto. During his term of 
office he repaired St. Etheldreda's shrine, and added different vestments 
and ornaments to those in use ; he gave to the church five rich copes of red 
silk, bound with gold lace and adorned with golden flowers, one of the 
copes having a circle of precious stones set in silver, an abbe starred with 
gold, a mitre, and a noble altar cloth. He also redeemed many ornaments 
which had been forfeited by his predecessor, and granted and confirmed 
by charter the sum of one hundred marks to be annually paid to the 
Sacrist from the treasury, to provide a wax taper to be kept burning 
constantly before the high altar in the church forever; and two marks aris- 
ing from lands in Somersham and Stokings, toward finding provision for 
the convent, and for an allowance of rye and good beer to be made on 
two days in the year. He had been nominated one of the executors of 
King Henry's wilf, which bears date at Waltham, A. D. 1182. The king 
dying abroad, in July, 1189, he went down (with many other bishops) to 
Winchester in great state, to await the arrival of the new king, and while 
there he was taken ill and died a iew days after. His body was conveyed 
thence to Ely* and interred in the cathedral church. Whether he was 

* The monastery of Ely was founded by Etlieldreda, daughter of Anna, Kins of 
the East Angles. Her first design was to build the cathedral at Craterdune, about 
a mile distant from the present city, where Ethelbert, King of the East Angles, is 
said to have founded a monastery, which was destroyed by the army of Penda, King 
of Mercia. From the Saxon Chronicles I learn that Etheldreda began her building 
at Ely in the year G73, and the year following was consecrated abbess of her own 
foundation. She was born about the year 630, at Ixning, in the western part of 



B1DDELLS OF NOBMANDY AXD ABDNAMUBCHAK. 51 



married has been a matter of question by sacred historians. I have found 
good proof that he was twice married, but the name of his first wife does 
not appear. He had, however, two sons by this wife, of whom hereafter. 
He married secondly, Sibilla, sister of William Maudit, Lord of Hanslap, 
and ancestor of the Earls of Warwick, by whom he left two sons and a 
daughter, of whom more hereafter. He was inquired after by the pope, 
and the answer was, "He has a gospel excuse for his absence." When 
the pope asked what that was, he was answered, " He has married a wife 
and therefore cannot come." From the foregoing, supplemented by the 
statement made at his confirmation, namely, that he had not since his 
admission to holy orders been married or cohabited with any woman, says 
a sacred writer, "seems to imply that he had been formerly married." 

Jordan Ridel 11 (1), fourth son of Matilda 10 (1) and Richard Basset, as- 
sumed the surname of Ridel, and became possessed of lands of Nogent and 
Aurillac, in Champagne, in France. This is the first time the name (Tor- 
dan occurs in the family. 



Hugh Ridel 11 (2), only son of Rignald 10 (1), was his father's successor, 
and having no male issue his daughter became heir to his own estate and 
that of Wittering. 

TWELFTH GENERATION. 

Margaret Ridel 1 " (1), a daughter of Hugh 11 (2), inherited the estates 
of her father, and became the wife of Hugh Ridel, of whom hereafter. 



Galfridus Ridel 1 " (6), eldest son of Galfridus 11 (5), obtained the prin- 
cipality of Blaye, upon his father's entering the church, and was one of 
the most celebrated of the troubadour poets. His history illustrates in a 
most striking manner the age of chivalry in which he lived. He was the 
favorite minstrel of Geoffrey de Plantagenet Bretagne, and during his res- 
idence at the court of England, where he lived in great honor and splen- 
dor, caressed for his talents and loved for the gentleness of his disposition, 
he heard continually the praises of the Countess of Tripoli, —  whose fame, 
in consequence of her munificent hospitality to the Crusaders, who, when 
returning from the plains of Asia, wayworn, sick, and disabled, were re- 
lieved and entertained by her, had spread throughout Christendom, — 
which praise of her beauty and benevolence, constantly repeated by the 
returned Crusaders, in their enthusiasm of gratitude, fired the heart of 
Ridel (sometimes spelled "Rudel") the poet to such an extent that, with- 
out having seen her, and unable to bear the torments of absence longer, he 
undertook a pilgrimage to visit the unknown lady. He quitted the Eng- 
lish court against the entreaties and expostulations of his prince, and sailed 
for the Levant. He became seriously ill on the voyage, and lived but a few 
hours after the vessel reached the harbor of Tripoli. When the countess 

Suffolk; her mother's name was Henswitha. She was first married to Toubert, a 
nobleman of the East Angles, and afterwards to Egfrid, Kiug of Northumberland, 
and, persevering with both husbands to live in a state of virginity, she was as- 
sisted in building the monastery by her brother Adolphus, at that time King of the 
East Angles. She died June 23, 679, and was buried in a wooden coffin, in the 
common cemetery with the nuns, by her orders. The See of Ely was created by 
King Henry I, in 1109 A. D. The bishops of Ely were Counts Palatine, but their 
rights as such were nearly all destroyed by Act of Parliament, in the reign of Henry 
VIII. The arms of Ely are, " Gules, three open crowns, two and one; or, bishop's 
mitre on top of the shield." 



52 RIDDELLS OF VORMANDY A.XD ARDNAMURCHAN. 

beard that a celebrated poet was on board, who was dying for her love, 
she immediately hastened to Ids side, and taking bis band entreated him 
to live for her sake. Ridel, already speechless :m<l almost in the agonies 
of death, revived for a moment at such unexpected tenderness and favor, 
and expressing the excess of his gratitude and love, died in her arms. 
The conntess wept most bitterly and vowed herself a life of penance for 
the loss she bad caused the world. She commanded that the last song 
Ridel had composed in her honor, should be transcribed in letters of gold, 
and carried it always in her bosom. His body was enclosed in a magnifi- 
cent mausoleum of porphyry, with aiwVrabic inscription, commemorating his 
genius and bis love for her. The song which the minstrel composed when 
on this romantic expedition, while bis strength was failing, and which was 
worn by the countess* within her vest to tin- end of life, is still extant, 
and has been translated into nearly every language in Europe; of these 
translations the following by Sismondi best preserves the original curious 
arrangement of the rhymes, as well as the piety and tenderness of the sen- 
timent : — 

" Irrite, dolent partirai, 

Si ne vois cet amour de loiu, 
Et ue sais quaud je le verrai 

Car sout par trop nos terres loin. 
Dieu, qui toutes choses as fait, 
Et forraas cet amour si loin, 
Donne force a mon coeur, car ai 

L'espoir devoir m' amour an loin. 
Ah, Seigneur, tenez pour bien vrai 
L' amour qu' ai pour elle de loin. 
Car pour un bien que j' en anrai, 

J'ai mille maux, tant je suis loiu. 
J' a d' autre amour ne jowirai, 

Si lion de cet amour de loin, — 
Qu'une plus belle jen'en scais 
En lien qui soit ni pres in loin ! " 

The following is as faithful a version anglicized, as the different idioms 
of the language will admit of: — 

"Grieved and troubled shall I die, 

If I meet not my love afar; 
Alas ! I know not that I e'er 

Shall see her, — for she dwells afar. 
O God ! that didst all things create, 

And formed my sweet love now afar: 
Strengthen my heart that I may hope 

To behold her face who is afar. 
Oh, Lord ! I believe how very true 

Is my love for her, who is afar; 
Tho' for each joy a thousand pains 

I bear, because I am so far." t 

Richard Ridel 1 " (1), second son of Galfridus" (5), succeeded his 
brother, before mentioned, and became possessed of nearly all the family 
estates in England. He resumed the surname of Bassett, and his family 
became extinct in the male line; consequently the inheritance devolved 
upon his brother, of whom hereafter. 

* Princess Melinseud, daughter of Raimoud, Count of Tripoli, the affianced bride 
of Manuel, Emperor of Constantinople. 

f This poem must have been composed a<s early as A. I). 11 ">0. 



RIDDELLS OF NORMANDY AND ARDNAMURVHAN. 53 



Hugh Ridel 12 (3), third son of Galfridus 11 (5), and eldest by his sec- 
ond wife, Sibilla Mandit, became on the death of his half-brother, who 
died without male issue, direct ancestor and representative of his family, 
and was the thirteenth in the order of succession. He possessed the prin- 
cipality of Blaye. His descendants became the representatives of the 
families of Ridel and Bassett. He married Margaret, daughter of another 
Hugh Ridel, before mentioned, and in her right acquired the lordship of 
Wittering, in Northamptonshire, the manor of Cranstown, in Scotland, 
the barony of Rilley, in Touraine, France, and considerable property in 
England, as she was heiress of her father, as before mentioned. By this 
means he became a powerful baron, and his name is truly distinguished in 
the annals of both England and Scotland. In 1174, he was one of the 
noblemen who were hostages to King Henry II, for William the Lion, 
King of Scotland, when taken prisoner at the battle of Alnwick. Through 
that prince he was allied to the Ajou, Chester, and St. Liz families. He 
had issue, three sons, of whom more hereafter. 

William Ridel 12 (5), fourth son of Galfridus 11 (5), by his second wife, 
Sibilla Maudit, was lord of the manor of Farringdon, in Northampton- 
shire, and of Primside and Glengarnoch, in Scotland, of which kingdom 
he was High Chancellor, under William the Lion. He died in the year 
1214, leaving an only son, of whom hereafter. 

Stephen Ridel 12 (1), a nephew of Bishop Ridel, is said by Dr. Millis 
to have been archdeacon of Ely in 1210, and resigned this office in 1214. 
Pie was chancellor to John Earl Moriton, afterwards King John ; and was 
possessed of several ecclesiastical benefices in this diocese, of which he 
was deprived by Bishop Longchamp, but probably restored to them 
:i!4'ain, as he afterwards occurs witness with Richard Barre, archdeacon of 
Ely, in several charters of Bishop Eustace. The name of this member of 
the Norman house of Ridel does not stand in the regular pedigree of the 
main line of the family, and there were, probably, many other junior 

branches omitted. 

THIRTEENTH GENERATION. 

Galfridus Ridel 13 (7), eldest son of Hugh 12 (3) and his wife Margaret, 
succeeded his father as Lord of Blaye, and was nephew of the barons 
who conspired against King John, in the year 1212. By the death of his 
nephew Hugh he again reunited to the family the estates of Wittering 
and Cranstown, but some of the lands possessed by Hugh had been made 
over by him to Ralph, Lord Basset, his kinsman of Weldon. He married 
Hawissa, daughter and co-heiress of William Peverel, in whose right he 
acquired Chiche Notley, and other lands in Essex, amounting to five 
knights' fees, by whom he had two sons, of whom hereafter. Galfridus 
died in 1249, and was succeeded by his son and namesake. 

Hugh Ridel 13 (4), second son of Hugh 12 (3), and Margaret, his wife, 
died before his father, — previous to 1200 A. D. 

Richard Ridel 13 (2), third son of Hugh 12 (3), succeeded to his mother's 
inheritance, and left one son, his heir. 



Ralph Ridel 13 (1), only son of William 12 (5), acquired the estate of 
Strixton, in Northamptonshire, by gift of his kinsman, William Maudit, 
Earl of Warwick, in 1232, and also the manor of Risby, in Lincolnshire, 
in right of his wife, Isabella, daughter of Falco D'Oyrie, by whom he had 
two sons, of whom hereafter. 



54 BIDDELLS OF NORMANDY AND ARDNAMURCHAN. 

FOURTEENTH GENERATION. 

Galfridus Ridel 14 (8), eldest son of Galfridus 13 (7), became ancestor 
of the main line of the Ridel family, and succeeded his father as the fif- 
teenth in succession in the lordships of Wittering and Cranstown, and in 
the barony of Blaye. In the king's writs, summoning him and his father 
to attend the army, and bring fifteen men at least with them into the field, 
this Galfridus is styled "Galfridus Ridel, junior." He was more than 
once entrusted with the important charge of forming and settling the 
articles of peace between the two monarchs of England and France, 
being chosen on the part of the former. He married the heiress of a large 
estate in the island of Oleron (her name does not appear), of which King 
Henry III ordered his Seneschal of Gascony to deliver seisin to her in 
the year 1234; by her he had two sons, of whom hereafter. He died in 
1261, a nobleman justly celebrated for his loyalty and the enjoyment of 
the favor of royalty. 

Roger Ridel 14 (1), second son of Galfridus 13 (7), succeeded to his 
mother's inheritance and enjoyed it in the lifetime of his father, on 
which account he was always designated "Roger Ridel, the son of Galfri- 
dus." He also possessed his father's lands in Normandy, where his pos- 
terity seems to have settled, and to have become a distinct and celebrated 
branch of the Ridel family. One of them, Martin Ridel, was Baron of 
More and Plainsevett, grand treasurer in France under Louis XIV. 
Some of the descendants of this man settled in the United States, and 
spelled their name Riddelle. 

Hugh Ridel 14 (5), only son of Richard 13 (2), inherited the estates of 
Wittering and Cranstown ; but dying without issue, these estates devolved 
upon his uncle Galfridus 13 (7), before mentioned. 



Robert Ridel 14 (1), eldest son of Ralph 18 (1), having no male issue, 
gave his lands of Strixton, which he inherited from his father, to the 
church, in 1282 ; but his estates in Scotland came to his daughter, of whom 
hereafter. 

Ralph Ridel 14 (2), second son of Ralph 13 (1), had Risby for his in- 
heritance. He married Agnes, heiress of Wildon, in Bedfordshire, by 
whom he had two sons, of whom more hereafter. 

FIFTEENTH GENERATION. 

Galfridus Ridel 16 (9), eldest son of Galfridus 14 (8), succeeded to his 
father's estate in 1261. In France we find him several times summoned 
to meet the king w T ell provided with horses and arms; and in England 
and Scotland, as a great benefactor to religious houses. He had issue 
three sons, of whom hereafter. 



Margaret Ridel 16 (2), daughter of Robert 14 (1), married a daughter 
of Henry de Cunningham, and became ancestress of the Cunninghams of 
Glencairn, earls. She was her father's heiress and inherited his estates 
in Scotland, and her descendants have represented some of the most 
worthy families in the realm. 

Sir John Ridel 16 (1), eldest son of Ralph" (2 i, was a knighl ami lord 

of the manor of Wildon in Bedfordshire, in riejil of his mother, an heiress. 
Ralph Ridel 16 (3), second son of Ralph 14 (2), inherited Risby, and 



BIDDELLS OF NOBMANDT AND ABDXAMUBCIIAX. 55 

had an only daughter, of whom nothing appears except that she was her 
father's heiress and was married to Sir William Marmioir, Knight. 

SIXTEENTH GENERATION. 

Galfridus Kidel 10 (10), eldest son of Galfridns 15 (9), succeeded his 
father in 1288, in the barony of Blaye. He was in great favor with 
Kings Edward I and II : the latter in 1308 wrote a letter in his behalf to 
the King of France, a copy of which is still preserved. He had one 
daughter, of whom hereafter. Died in 1319 A. D. 

Sir Hugh Ridel 10 (6), second son of Galfridns 15 (9), succeeded to 
the manor of Wittering and Cranstown, and to the barony of Montclare 
and Piragord, and in consequence of his brother's dying without male 
issue became eventually head of this family. He served King Edward 
II in his war against Scotland, and swore fealty to him in 1296. As he 
held his lands in Scotland of King Edward, as lord paramount in that 
country ; for tarrying too long in Scotland, King Edward took from 
him his manor of Wittering, and gave it to his son Galfridus. Thus 
deprived of his rights, Hugh went to his kinsman, Sir William Ridell of 
Northumberland, who generously settled upon him a part of his revenue. 

Sir Nicholas Kidel 16 (1), third son of Galfridns 15 (9), acquired the 
barony of Sotus, in Agenois in Guinne, and the manor of Sallows, in 
Norfolk. His posterity became the representatives of this family, as will 
afterwards appear. 

SEVENTEENTH GENERATION. 

Alicia Ridel 17 (1), only daughter of Galfridns 16 (10), was married to 
William Furt, a Baron of Gascony. Her f)retensions to the barony of 
Blaye, were doubtful, as it seems to have been confirmed, like many 
others, to male heirs only; in which case, it should have devolved upon 
her uncle Hugh, before mentioned. Alicia, however, having got posses- 
sion of it, sold her rights and pretensions with regard to it to Edward II, 
King of England, who had power enough to secure his bargain against 
any impeachment that could be made against it by a subject, and par- 
ticularly as Hugh was out of favor at court. A clause, however, was 
inserted in the deed of conveyance, that, should Alicia's rights be 
rendered invalid, she should lose the greater part of the purchase-money. 



Sir Galfridus Ridel 17 (11), son of Hugh 16 (6), Baron of Montclare 
and lord of the manors of Wittering and Cranstown ; but this last pos- 
session he lost during the Scotch wars, in which he took an active part 
against King Robert Bruce's party. He died in 1346, and was succeeded 
by his son, of whom hereafter. 



William Ridel 17 (6), son of Nicholas 16 (1), succeeded to his father's 
estate as Lord of Sallows and of the manor of Sallows ; he was returned 
to hold that lordship in 1316; his name is to be found in many bene- 
factories. He had issue two sons, of whom hereafter. 

EIGHTEENTH GENERATION. 

Sir Hugh Ridel 18 (7), son of Galfridns 17 (11), succeeded his father 
in 1346, as Baron of Montclare and lord of the manor of Wittering. He 
petitioned King Edward III to procure him the restitution of Crans- 
town, which his ancestors had held time immemorial of the kings of 
England. His petition was not successful. He died in 1363 A. D., with- 



56 IUDDELLS OF N0BMAND1 AND ABDNAMUBCHAN. 

out issue, wherepon the manor of Wittering, as well as the representa- 
tion of the family, devolved upon the grandson of Sir Nicholas Ridel, 
before mentioned, who entering the church in the year 1800, settled his 
manor and lands upon his son. 

Sir Nicholas Ridel" (2), eldest son and heir of William 17 (6), was 
Lord of Sotus and of the manor of Sallows. He afterwards succeeded 
to the manor of Wittering, in Northamptonshire, and to Montclare, in 
F'iragord, upon the death of his kinsman, Hugh Ridel, before mentioned ; 
and at the same time assumed the representation of the family under 
notice. He died shortly after, in 1363 A. D., leaving two sons, of 
whom hereafter. 

John RideP (2), second son of William 17 (6), entered into the church 
and became rector of Chigwell, in Essex. 

NINETEENTH GENERATION. 

Sir John Ridel 19 (3), eldest son of Nicholas 1 " (2), succeeded his 
father as representative of this family, and inherited the family estates in 
England and France ; and also procured a charter from King David 
II, of Scotland, granting him the manor of Cranstown, which had been 
lost by his predecessors ; this property he either sold, or was forced to 
relinquish, as we find it possessed by William Watson soon after. Thus 
the family, by losing their possessions in Scotland, for many years had 
no intercourse with that kingdom, till they acquired other propertv 
there, as will presently appear. Sir John made a conspicuous figure in 
the wars between England and France. He was succeeded by his son, of 
whom more hereafter. 

William Ridel 1 '' (7), second son of Nicholas 15 (2), acquired the manor 
of Walcot, and other lands in Northamptonshire. He made a conspicuous 
figure with his brother, before mentioned, in the wars between France and 
England ; and dying without issue male his property was divided be- 
tween his two daughters, one of whom was the wife of Sir Richard Grif- 
fin, the other of Sir Richard Sutton ; their names do not appear. 

Nicholas Ridel 19 (3), third son of Nicholas 18 (2), was proprietor of 
the manors of Wittering and Sallows, and Baron of Montclare and Sotus, 
in France. He died in 1405, leaving two sons, of whom hereafter. Nich- 
olas became head of this family. 

TWENTIETH GENERATION. 

Hugh Ridel 20 (8), eldest son of Nicholas 19 (3), succeeded to his father's 
estates of Montclare, Wittering, and others. He married Elizabeth Cowal, 
heiress of Thornby, in Northamptonshire, by whom he had three sons, of 
whom hereafter. He died in 1422 A. D., and was succeeded by his son. 

Thomas Ridel" (1), second son of Nicholas 19 (3), appears in the pedi- 
gree without mention of his capacity. 

TWENTY-FIRST GENERATION. 

Nicholas Ridel 21 (4), eldest son of Hugh 20 (8), was lord of the manor 
of Wittering. He was strongly attached to the house of Lancaster; and 
in honor of King Henry VI he named his son and heir. The whole of 
the family estates on the Continent were in his time lost, in consequence 
of the province of Guinne being wrested from the English Crown in 
1445 A. D. He was succeeded by his son, of whom hereafter. 

Sir William Ridel 21 (8), second son of Hugh 20 (8), obtained for his 



BWDELLS OF NOBMANDT AND ABDNAMUBCHAN. 57 

inheritance the manor of Sallows and the barony of Sotus in Gninne, 
where he distinguished himself in several engagements in which he fought. 
Having no children, his third brother, of whom hereafter, succeeded to 
his property; and the son of his brother eventually became head of this 
family, as will appear. 

Thomas Ridel 21 (2), third son of Hugh' 20 (8), succeeded to his brother 
William, before mentioned, as lord of the manor of Wittering and the 
barony of Sotus in Guinne. In 1422 he entered the service of France 
when leagued with England, and served as an English Esquire, under his 
brother Sir William, who was then proprietor of Sallows. He died in 
1428, and was succeeded by his son, of whom more hereafter. 

TWENTY-SECOND GENERATION. 

Henry Ridel' 22 (1), son of Nicholas' 21 (4), was his father's heir to Wit- 
tering and other lands in Northamptonshire. He distinguished himself 
by his attachment to the house of Lancaster during the civil wars. He 
was named in honor of King Henry VI. He married Egidia, who sur- 
vived him some years (he deceased in 1471), and by her had issue, an 
(inly daughter and heir, who became the wife of Robert Halley, Esq., who, 
in her right, enjoyed the lands which belonged to the Ridel family. Thus 
the manor of Wittering passed out of the family after remaining in their 
possession above three hundred years. Some monuments still remain in 
the old church at Wittering, especially their coat-of-arms (see their arms 
in this book), which is on stained glass, in the upper pane of the chancel. 
The family vault may also be seen. Upon the death of Henry, the rep- 
resentation of the family devolved upon his cousin, of whom hereafter. 

Sir John Riddell 22 (4), son of Thomas 21 (2), was lord of the manor 
of Sallows and Baron of Sotus in Guinne, where he fought in defense of 
his property, but lost it irrecoverably when that province fell into the 
hands of the French. He bore his own standard, being a knight banneret, 
and was served by thirteen esquires. He is the first of this family who is 
known to have spelled the surname with the double letters. He was re- 
turned to hold the manor of "Riddell," in Sallows, in A. D. 1458, and 
died in A. D. 1474, leaving issue two sons, of whom hereafter. 

TWENTY-THIRD GENERATION. 

Thomas Riddell 23 (3), eldest son of John' 22 (4), was styled " of Sallows, 
Esquire." In his time the family had lost much of its grandeur and influ- 
ence. The manor of Wittering, and other lands in Northamptonshire, 
were now lost, and the estates in Guinne, estates which caused the Ridels 
to have a continued connection with France for Jive hundred years, that 
is from their existence as a distinct family, now also remained to them 
no longer. Thomas died in 1505 A. D., and was succeeded by his son. 

Robert Riddell 23 (2), second son of John 22 (4), served in the ai*my of 
France, in the year 1480, and was styled an " English Esquire." 

TWENTY-FOURTH GENERATION. 

Thomas Riddell 24 (4), a son of Thomas' 23 (3), was styled " of Sallows, 
Esquire." He married Constantina, daughter of John Calle, of Melton, 
in the County of Norfolk. By an inquisition at the castle of Norwich, it 
appears that he died Sept. 20, 1545, leaving an only son, then only nine 
years old, who was his successor. 



58 BIDDELLS OF NOBMANDJ AND ABDNAMUBCHAN. 

TWENTY-FIFTH GENERATION. 

John Riddell"' (5), only son of Thomas 84 (4), succeeded his father 
when a child. In the year 1550 he sold his manor of Sallows, and other 
possessions in Norfolk, to one Nicholas Southerton, being then fourteen 
years old. He then went to and dwelt in Scotland, where he was well 
received by King James I. He married a daughter of Thomas Urquahart, 
of Cromerty, by Helen, daughter of Lord Abernethy, of Salton, by whom 
he had two sons. He died in 15*4 A. D. 

TWENTY-SIXTH GENERATION. 

James Riddell 20 (1), eldest son of John-'' (5), succeeded to his father's 

estates.* He remained in Scotland where his father had settled, and 
acquired considerable property in the County of Edinburgh; to this a 
remarkable addition was made by his marriage with Elizabeth, daughter 
of Adam Alleyn, Esq., a connection which formed a sufficient induce- 
ment for him to fix his residence in Scotland. He died in the year 1620, 
Leaving an only son, his successor. 

TWENTY-SEVENTH GENERATION. 

James Riddell" 7 (2), only son of James- 6 (l),t was styled, "of King- 
lass, in Linlithgowshire, Esquire." The estate of Kinglass he purchased 
soon after his father's death. He was a man of great talents, and of the 
most exemplary virtues, both public and private. To his patriotic endeav- 
ors Scotland is indebted for the introduction of some of its most valuable 
manufactures. To these endeavors his great influence, both in England and 
Scotland, gave success, as it secured the concurrence and assistance of some 
of the most eminent men of that time, and particularly that worthy noble- 
man, the Earl of Crawford and Lindsey, who in one manufactory joined with 
him in partnership. Being a man of the most liberal spirit, he was equally 
respected during the time of the commonwealth, and afterwards under the 
newly established monarchial government. | Many friendly letters which 



* About 1595, this James Riddell was made a free denizen of the royal city of 
Kasimier, and in 1602, he had from Alexander, then King of Poland, all the priv- 
ileges of a free citizen confirmed to him. On his return to Scotland he became a 
burgess aud guild-brother of Edinburgh. He died in 1G20. 

f The following acrostic in praise of James Riddell aud the antiquity of his fam- 
ily, which was taken from the family papers, is a curiosity worthy a place here. 

"J I cannot chuse but preyse thy noble name, 
A As one descended from an ancient stoke ; 
M Mars into belyck lies renoined thee feme, 
B Excelling all the base and vulgar sort. 
S So hold thyself of a brave, loftee mind, 
R Resembles rycht thee art comyt of that kyud, 
I Join all the art wyse and judicious; 
D Descreet iu lyfe and conversatione, 
D Distroying all evil leafes virtions, 
E Esteemed, beloved, and of gentill fashoun; 
L Loftee and gallant, a youth of pregnant spirits, 
L Likely by fortune to be raiset by merit." 
It is not known which James Riddell this was written to, but believed to repre- 
sent the above James, hence placed in this connection. 

X During the civil wars this James Riddell was much in the confidence of Oliver 
Cromwell and General Monk; the former once lodged with him in his house at 
Leith, aud afterwards corresponded with him. He was appointed by the Scots Es- 
tates, Commissary General to their forces, in their expedition to the north, and he 
is so designated in his burgess ticket from the town of Brechin, in 1645. At Mr. 



BIDDELLS OF NORMANDY AND ARDNAMU1WHAN. 59 

passed between him and General Monk, together with a passport written, 
signed, and sealed by the General himself, in November, 1659, are still 
preserved. Probably the General's affection for Mr. Riddell was stronger 
on account of his being descended from Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, and 
from Galfridus, Lord Ridel. He married Sept. 19, 1639, Elizabeth, eldest 
daughter of George Foulis, Esq., of Ravelstone, Master of the King's Mint, 
niece of Sir James Foulis, of Ingleby, in Yorkshire, Baronet, ancestor of 
Sir Archibald Primrose, by whom he had nine sons, the two eldest of whom 
successively became his heirs, and eight daughters, one of whom was the 
wife of Walter Riddell, of Minto. This marriage is the first alliance be- 
tween the main line now under consideration, and the Roxburghshire 
branch, after it was broken off and established as a distinct family. This 
James died in 1674, aged 66 years. 

TWENTY-EIGHTH GENERATION. 

James Riddell 2 " (3), eldest son of James 27 (2), succeeded his father in 
the estate of Kinglass, Scotland, and was a captain in the service of the 
States of Holland. He greatly encumbered his paternal estate, and dying 
unmarried in 1688, he was succeeded by his brother, as hereafter stated. 

George Riddell 2s (1), second son of James 27 (2), was styled " of King- 
lass, Esquire," having succeeded his brother James, before mentioned. 
He married Jane, eldest daughter of Capt. John Tailzeour, by his first 
wife, who was daughter of Dr. John Evans, rector of Lewisham, in 
Kent, descended from an ancient family in Wales; by her he had issue 
six sons and eight daughters. He was a wine merchant at Leeds, Scotland. 
He was succeeded in 1706 by his son ; the only one known to be then 
living. 

TWENTY-NINTH GENERATION. 

Capt. George Riddell 29 (2), eldest son of George 2S (1), in whose time 
the estate of Kinglass passed out of the family. He married Christiana, 
daughter of Andrew Patterson, Esq., of Kirkton, by Barbara his third 
wife, daughter of Colonel MacDougall, a younger son of the family of 
Treugh, now represented by the Earl of Dumfries, and sister of James 
Patterson, Esq., of Kirkton, who married the Honorable Catherine, daugh- 
ter of Lord John Gray, and had issue nine sons and six daughters. Cap- 
tain Riddell was a distinguished man. 

THIRTIETH GENERATION. 

Dr. George Riddell 30 (3), eldest son of George 29 (2), became an 
eminent physician in Yorkshire, Va., and is supposed to have died before 
his father, as the succession of the estate devolved upon a younger 
brother, who, was settled at Belton. I have not been able to learn whether 
this man had a family. 

Andrew Riddell 30 (2), second son of George 29 (2), was styled " of En- 
held," and is presumably the first of that family, which see for account of 
descendants. He was an officer in the army. 

Riddell's request a church at Leith was restored to the parishioners by General 
Monk, — it had been used for a stable, — and the citizens conferred upon him a large 
space in the body of the church for a seat for his family. His passport from Gen- 
eral Monk allowed him to pass and repass, free from molestation, with his servants, 
horses, and arms, about his private affairs. After the Restoration he obtained 
from Ch tries II an order for erecting a new manufactory of woolen and tow cards, 
the first of the kind in Scotland, for which he obtained an act of Scottish Parlia- 
ment, in 1663. 



60 I! I UDELLS OF NORMANDY AND ARDNAMURCHAN. 

Sir James Riddell 80 (4), third son of George 29 (2), was styled "of 
Ardnamurchan and Sunart." He had the honor to be created a baronet 
by the King's Most Excellent Majesty, Sept. 2, 1778. He was a Doctor 
of Law, Justice of the Peace for the Counties of Argyle and Suffolk, and 
member of the Society for Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, and 
Commerce. He married first, Mary, daughter of Thomas B. Milles, of 
Billockby Hall, in the County of Norfolk, by Helen his third wife, daughter 
of Major Ferrier of Hemsby, and Member of Parliament for Yarmouth, 
in the same county. By her he had four sons and one daughter, who, 
with the second and fourth sons, died young. He married secondly, in 
1 775, Sarah, daughter of Thomas Burden, Esq., in the county of Durham 
and York, as heir to her father and grandfather, Henry Poster, Esq. 

John Riddell 80 (6), fourth son of George 20 (2), acquired wealth by 
commerce in Virginia, and is supposed to have taken up his residence in 
that State, but no account of a family appears in the Scottish pedigree. 

Robert Riddell 30 (3), fifth son of George 29 (2), was styled "of Garzield, 
Dumfrieshire." He married Susanna-Andry Kenneys, and became an 
officer in the royal regiment of Horse Guards. He died at Musselburgh, 
in 1802, and his widow at Garzield, in 1806 (?). In the account of his 
death found in the Gentleman' s Magazine, Mr. Riddell is styled " of 
Kennys Hall," in Dumfrieshire, Scotland ; no account of a family. 

THIRTY-FIRST GENERATION. 

Sir Thomas-Milles Riddell 31 (5), eldest son of James 80 (4), was styled 
"of Mount Riddell," in the County of Stirling. He succeeded his father 
as second baronet ; married, in 1784, Margaret, daughter of Col. Dugald 
Campbell, by Christiana, daughter of the late Alexander Drummond, Esq., 
Consul at Aleppo, son of John Drummond of Newton, and sister of Gen. 
Duncan Campbell of Lochness, in the County of Argyle, by whom he had 
issue two sons and Jive daughters. He died July 19, 1796; his wife died 
Oct. 31, 1836. Succeeded by his eldest son. 

Lieut. George-James Riddell 31 (4), third son of James 30 (4), was 
styled "of London Stubbs," in the County of Norfolk. He was a most 
accomplished youth, and an officer of great promise in the second troop of 
Horse Grenadier Guards. He fell in a duel, April 23, 1783 ; the circum- 
stances, copied from the Gentleman's Magazine, are as follows : " A duel 
was fought between Mr. George Riddell of the Horse Grenadiers, and Mr. 
Cunningham of the Scots Greys. Both of these gentlemen belonged for- 
merly to the Scots Greys, and had differed at play. Mr. Riddell had chal- 
lenged Mr. Cunningham, which challenge was declined; but many of tin' 
gentlemen reviving at intervals that circumstance, Mr. Cunningham found 
it necessary for the full restoration of his honor, that he should call upon 
Mr. Riddell. This appeal Mr. Riddell considering out of season, declined 
attending to, till he had consulted his fellow-officers, who agreed there 
was no obligation on him to answer Mr. Cunningham. This being their 
determination, Mr. Cunningham resolved upon forcing him to the point, 
and meeting him accidentally at Mr. Christie's, their agent, spit in his face. 
Mr. Riddell, observing that this was a fresh insult, he should take notice 
of it, and took his departure. He then immediately proceeded to make a 
few arrangements in his affairs; but before he had completed them, he 
received a billet from Mr. Cunningham, reminding him of the affront he 
had passed upon him, and declaring his readiness to give him satisfaction. 
This note coming while the wafer was yet wet to the hands of Sir James 



THE N : '^F 1 

PUBLIC Lit f J 



'0N3 







^Sk^^ - ? 



JRIDDELLS OF NOBMAXDT AND ABDNAMUBCHAN. 61 

Riddell, who was under some apprehenson of his son's situation, opened 
it, and having read it, closed it without taking any notice of its contents 
more than providing in consequence of it, the assistance of several surgeons 
of the first ability. The meeting was fixed, they were both punctual, Mr. 
Riddell attended by Captain Topham, of the Horse Grenadiers, and Mr. 
Cunningham by Captain Cunningham, of the Sixty-ninth Regiment of Foot. 
Eight paces were first measured by the seconds, and then the contending 
parties took their ground. They tossed up for the first fire, and Mr. 
Riddell won. He then fired, and shot Mr. Cunningham under the 
right breast, the ball passing as is supposed through the ribs, and lodging 
on the left side near the back. The moment Cunningham received the 
shot, he reeled, but did not fall ; he opened his waistcoat and declared he 
was mortally wounded. Mr. Riddell still remained on his ground, when 
Mi-. Cunningham, after a pause of two minutes, declared he would not be 
taken off the field, till he had fired at his adversary ; he then presented 
his pistol, and shot Mr. Riddell in the groin, when he immediately fell and 
was carried in a coach to Mr. Topham's, where he lingered until seven 
o'clock on Thursday morning, and then expired." After four hours' sit- 
ting, the coroner's jury brought in a verdict of manslaughter. 

THIRTY-SECOND GENERATION. 

Sir James-Milles Riddell 32 (5), eldest son of Thomas 31 (5), succeeded 
his grandfather. He was Justice of the Peace, and Doctor of Law for the 
County of Argyle. He married Mary, daughter of Sir Richard Brooke, 
Bart., of Newton Priory, County of Chester, and had issue, of whom 
hereafter. Sir James died at Strontian,* in 1861, and was succeeded by his 
son, of whom more hereafter. 

Campbell-Drumiiioiid Riddell 32 (1), second son of Thomas 31 (5), was 
born Jan. 9, 1796; married in Ceylon, in April, 1830, Caroline-Stuart, 
daughter of the Hon. John-Rodney Stuart, by his wife, Lady Louisa 
Stafford, and had issue, of whom hereafter. He was Colonial Secretary 
of New South Wales. Died in Feb. 1859, aged 62 years. 

Christiaiia-Drummoiid Riddell 32 (1), eldest daughter of Thomas 31 (5), 
of whom no particulars. 

Marj -Milles-Geva Riddell 82 (1), second daughter of Thomas 31 (5), of 
whom no particulars. 

Sarall-Blirdeil Riddell 32 (1), third daughter of Thomas 31 (5), was mar- 
ried in 1835, to Maj. J. C. Young, of the Seventy-ninth Regiment. 

* Stroxtian. — The residence of Sir James-Milles Riddell, Baronet of Ardnamur- 
chan, is surrounded by dressed and planted groves. The neat slated cottages of 
the village, substantialy built of granite, and sometimes adorned Avith parasitic 
plants, contrast strongly with some turf huts, with which they are intermingled, 
and indicate the neighborhood of a resident proprietor. These cottages were 
erected for the use of the miners employed in the celebrated Strontian Mines, and 
the huts previously in existence were purged from their offensiveness, and dressed 
into comparative beauty; a complete moral change was introduced into the village 
by Sir James Riddell and his lady ; they insisted on'cleauliness in and out of doors, 
and as the hand readily obeys the will, the girls soon caught the spirit of the lesson, 
and were not only neat and tidy themselves, but carried the same principle into 
their fathers' homes. About the date of the Revolution, the manufacture of straw 
plait was introduced by the proprietor, as means of useful employment for the 
females, and the improvement of the condition of the whole population. There 
are considerable lead mines on the estate, but I believe they are not worked at pres- 
ent. Strontian is 25 miles in length, by 10 miles in width, and comprises 40,099 
acres, inhabited mostly by shepherds, miners, crofters, and farm hands. 



62 UIDDELLS OF ENFIELD. ENGLAND. 

Eleanor-Frazer Riddell 82 (1), fourth daughter of Thomas 31 (5), of 
whom no particulars. 

Margaret Riddell 3 " (1), fifth daughter of Thomas 31 (5), of whom no 
particulars. 

THIRTY-THIRD GENERATION. 

Sir Thomas-Milles Riddell 33 ((>), eldest son of James 32 (5), was born 
Dec. 25, 1822; succeeded his father as third Baronet, in 1861, and is 
Justice of the Peace, Magistrate, and Doctor of Law for the Counties of 
Argyle and Inverness; was formerly lieutenant of King's Dragon Guards, 
and captain of the Perth Militia. He married in 1851, Mary-Anna, 
daughter of John Hodgson, Esq., of St. Petersburgh. No issue. He has 
been in Parliament. His heir presumptive, his cousin, of whom hereafter. 
He is a gentleman of fine personal appearance. See portrait in this book. 
Residence, Strontian, Argyleshire, Scotland. He died in 1883. 

Richard-Brooke Riddell 33 (3), second son of James 32 (5), was born 
in 1825, and died in 1832. 

Mary-Brooke-Geva Riddell 38 (2), daughter of James 32 (5), died in 
the year 1823. 

Mary-Augusta Riddell 83 (3), a daughter of James 3 ' 2 (5), was married 
in 1852, to the Rev. H. Cunliffe, Vicar of Shifnal. 



Lieut. Roduey-Stuart Riddell 33 (1), a son of Campbell 32 (1), was 
born in 1838, and is an officer in the Seventieth Foot Regiment. He is heir 
presumptive of Sir Thomas, his cousin. 

Thomas-Milles-Stratford Riddell 38 (7), a son of Campbell 32 (1), was 
born Jan. 22, 1832. 



RIDDELLS OF ENFIELD, ENGLAND. 

[Kinglass Branch.] 

Col. Andrew Riddell 1 (1), was second son of George (2)*, of the 
family denominated Riddells of Kinglass, Scotland; he was appointed lieu- 
tenant of the Sixty-sixth Regiment of Foot, April 19, 1789; captain, Dec. 
4, 1802 ; captain Fiftieth Foot, May 25, 1803; major by brevet, Dec. 10, 
1807, and lieutenant-colonel, June 4, '1814. He was many years on the 
staff in different parts of England, as an Assistant Quartermaster General. 
He died at his seat at Enfield, Nov. 16, 1825, leaving issue. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Jolm-Rignald Riddell' 2 (1), a son of Andrew 1 (1), was of Byculla 
House, Enfield, and Speacomb Place, Devon. He wrote the author of 
this book, just as he was to sail for the continent, and promised that, on 
his return home, where he could have access to his family papers, he 
would provide full records of his family, but for some unknown reason has 
made no reply to subsequent letters of inquiry. 

* Andrew Riddell, the first of Enfield, was the secoud sou of Capt. George 
Riddell, of Kinglass, and his wife Christiana, daughter of Andrew Patterson, and 
brother of James, the first of Ardnaiiiurchau. 



Ill UDELLS OF ROXBURGHSHIRE, SCOTLAND, 63 

Jane Riddell" (1), only daughter of Andrew 1 (1), of Enfield, was 
married Jan. 14, 1773, to Robert-Sadlier Moody, Esq., of Asply Guise. 
She died Oct. 10, 1825, and was buried at St. Mary-le-Bone. Mr." Moody 
was a commissioner of Her Majesty's Victualling-board ; he was born 
March 21, 1744, died Nov. 9, 1825, and was buried at St. Mary-le-Bone. 
Rev. Henry-Riddell Moody was a son of Robert. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Rignald-Charles Riddell 3 (1), second son of John- (1), was married 
Sept. 8, 1862, to Maria-Isabella, eldest daughter of Augustus-Charles Sky- 
mer, Esq., late major of the Sixteenth Lancers. The marriage was at 
Priestbury. 

Walter-Kenneys Riddell 3 (1), third son of John 2 (1), of Enfield, 
Middlesex, died at Brussels, in 1849. 



RIDDELLS OF ROXBURGHSHIRE, SCOTLAND. 

[Created Baronets May 12, 1628.] 

(, Gervasius de Rydale 1 (1), a son of Philip 9 (1), of that family whose 
oenealogy will be found in this work under the designation of "Riddells 
of Ardnamurchan, Scotland" (which see), accompanied David, Prince of 
Cumberland, into Scotland* early in the twelfth century, and became so 
great a favorite that he was appointed the first High Sheriff of Roxburgh- 
shire, and received grants of lands there as a reward for services faith- 
fully performed. He must have been a very influential man, for he was a 
constant attendant on royalty, as shown by crown charters to which he 
was a witness, and especially that celebrated document, the " Inquisito 
Principle Davidi?" one of the most ancient records in Scotland, being 
dated as early as A. D. 1116. Gervasius married Christiana de Soulis, 
and by her had issue, of whom hereafter. His wife was a liberal donor to 
Jedburgh monastery, and Gervasius, when he was advanced in life, 
assumed the ecclesiastical garb, and died at Jedburgh in the odor of 
sanctity. This was a prevailing custom and considered a great privilege, 
namely, that those who had led a secular and a sinful life sought to atone 
for the past by dying in a monastery; this practice was also followed by 
many whose lives had been peaceful and blameless, a manifest reverence 
in religion, although a religion of error. 

Walter de Ridale 1 (1), a son of Philip 9 (1), who was son of Galfridus 
Ridel of France, and brother of Gervasius, before mentioned, accompa- 
nied Prince David to Scotland, and like his brothers, enjoyed the friend- 
ship and patronage of royalty. He was a witness to crown and other 
charters of importance, but that to himself, from King David I, of the 

* Sir Walter Scott says tradition carries the history of this family to a point ex- 
tremely remote, and is sanctioned by the discovery of two stone coffins, one con- 
taining a pot with ashes and arms, dated A. D. 727; the other elated A. D. 936, and 
filled with the hones of a man of gigantic size. 

One writer says Gervaise Ridale received from Earl Henry, son of David, King 
of Scotland, a grant of lands called Prenwentsete, now Primside, near Yetholm, 
about three miles from the English border. 



64 lUDDELLs OF BOXBURGHSHIBE, SCOTLAND. 

lauds of Wester Li Hies leaf, in Roxburghshire, eclipsed them all, being 
the most ancient charter known from a king to a layman. This charter 
was granted between 1120 and 1153; it included lands called Whiitun, 
mar the Cheviot Hills, the lands to be held of the crown, "per servitium 
unius militia sicut unus baronum meorum vicinorum suorumP Another 
authority gives the date of the charter as 111:2, confirming possessions to 
li Walter us de Ridal de terris de Lilliesleaf et dimidum de Estetho (or 
Chetto), et W/iittunes tenen de Rege per servitium unius militis, sicut 
unus Baronum nostrovum, coram Andrm Episcopo de Catanis, Waltero 
Filio AUansi et Ricardo de MoravUlo." This ancient document became 
so frail by lapse of time that it was legally copied during a court held at 
Jedburgh, by order of Lord Gray, Justice General of Scotland, in 1556. 
Xisbit, the antiquary and herald, who flourished in the early part of the 
last century drew the copy. These lands were subsequently denominated 
the Baronies of Riddel! and Whittun, in part from the possession, and the 
latter, "Domini de Ridded and Whittunus." The charter styles Walter 
a sheriff, and confirms to him all the lands of which his brother Gervasius 
died possessed. This Walter married Ethrida de Percy, sister to the Lord 
of Oxenham, and having no issue was succeeded bv his brother, of whom 
hereafter. Walter died about the year 1150. 

Sir Auskittel de Ridale 1 (1), son of Philip 9 (1), of the house of 
Ridel, or Rydale, denominated "of Ardnamurchan " in this work, suc- 
ceeded his brother Walter, before mentioned. His name is spelled in an- 
cient documents, Anschittal, Auskittal, Anschittil, and Oscittal. The 
lands of his brother Walter were derived by will, and confirmed by a bull 
from Pope Adrian IV, dated 8th April, 1155. The bull runs thus: — 
"Adrianus Episcopus, servus servorum Dei, Auskittel Riddell militi, solo- 
tem et Apostolicum Benedictionem, sub Beati Petri et nostri protectione 
suscepimus specialiter ae quw Wa/terus de Riddell testamentum suum ante 
obitum suumfaciens tibi nosciter reliquisse, viz., villas de Whittunus, Lillies- 
clive, Braehebe, etcetera bona a quibuscunque tibi juste colate, nos authori- 
tate sedis Apostolical integre confirmamus. Datum Beneventi Septimo 
ides Aprilis^ There is another bull from Pope Alexander III, dated 7th 
of June, 1160, confirming the will of the said Walter de Ridale, bequeath- 
ing to his brother Auskittel the lands of Lilliesclives and Whittuns, and 
ratifying the bargain between Auskittel and Huctrudes concerning the 
church at Lilliesclives, in consequence of the mediation of Malcolm II, 
and confirmed by a charter from that monarch. One authority says, "Os- 
citel Ridal having returned to his native land with consent of King Mal- 
com Canmore, gave his lands of Cranstown, Preston, and others to his 
son Hugo (Hugh), who in the year 1110 bestowed the church of Crans- 
town and certain lauds in the barony, to the monastery of Selkirk, which 
was founded by Prince David during the reign of his brother, Alexander 
I. This monastery was afterwards transferred to Kelso when David suc- 
ceeded to the throne." This writer says, " Ocitel married Elena, daughter 
to Robert de Morville, lord of Riddesdale, in Northumberland, and by 
her had several sons." His wife seems to have been a sister to Jordanus 
le Fleming. Auskittel died in 1180, and was succeeded by his eldest son, 
of whom hereafter. Sir Auskittel was a witness to a charter of confir- 
mation granted to the monks of Kelso in 1159, by Malcolm IV, the grand- 
son of David I. His title represented knighthood. 

Ralph de Ridale 1 (l),a son of Philip (1), and brother of Gervasius 
and Auskittel, was a donor to Jedburgh Abbey. 



RIDDELLS OF ROXBURGHSHIRE. SCOTLAND. 65 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Walter <le Ridale 2 (2), eldest son and heir of Auskittel 1 (1), suc- 
ceeded his father in the year. 1180. He married Guynolda, daughter of 
Earl Gospatrick, and had issue two sons, of whom hereafter. 

Hugh de Ridale" (1), second son of Auskittel 1 (1), was ancestor of the 
family denominated "Riddells of Cranstown-Riddell," a distinguished 
baronial family that nourished about two centuries and ended in heirs 
female in 1357, the daughter of the last proprietor, Isabella Rydell, hav- 
ing been the wife of John Murray. This family were created baronets, 
long previous to the " Riddells of Riddell" Roxburghshire, and gave their 
name to their lands which were held of the crown. This Hugh was one 
of the hostages for the ransom of King William after his capture at the 
battle of Alnwick, A. D. 1174. See "Riddells of Cranstown." 

JordailUS de Ridale' 2 (1), third son of Auskittel 1 (1), and brother of 
the preceding, became ancestor of the family in Northumberland, now 
denominated "of Felton and Swinburn." See history of this family. 
Jordanus was named for his uncle Jordanus le Fleming, and was witness 
to a charter from King William to the Abbey of Dunfermline, together 
with David, the king's brother, Nicholas the Chancellor, and Robert de 
Quincey. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Sir Patrick de Riddell 3 (1), eldest son of Walter 2 (2), married 
Christiana, daughter to Eustace de Vescie, by Margaret, illegitimate 
daughter to King William the Lion, by whom he acquired the lands of 
Sprouston, for William de Riddell, son of Sir Patrick, is witness to a 
charter granted by John de Vescie to William de Vescie, " Domvnus de 
Sprouston de Nova Tirva de Moli" and is there described as son to Chris- 
tian, daughter of Margaret. After succeeding to his estates he made dona- 
tions to the Abbey of Melrose, and to the monks serving God there ; his 
wife, or widow, confirmed her husband's donations. Christian, his wife, was 
a member of that border family of de Vescie, of whom one was a feudal 
lord, appointed to enforce the observance of Magna Charta ; her grand- 
father, " William the Lion," king of Scotland, brother of Malcolm IV, 
so surnamed from having introduced the lion as the armorial bearing of 
Scotland ; and from this emblem the head of the Herald's Office in Edin- 
burgh is called " Lion-King-at-arms." Sir Patrick had issue three sons, of 
whom hereafter. Sir Patrick was knighted. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Walter de Riddell 4 (2), eldest son of Patrick 3 (1), succeeded as his 
father's heir, and married a daughter of Hugh de Giffard, " Dominus de 
Yester" and had issue two sons, of whom hereafter. He seems to have 
been a pious churchman, for he not only confirmed his father's donations 
to the convent of Melrose, but gave many benefactions himself, not only 
to the monks of Melrose, but to those of Kelso. 

William de Riddell 4 (1), second son of Patrick 3 (1), married Matilda 
Corbett, and received from his father at the time of his alliance with that 
lady, a part of his lands at Whittun;. but he died without children, and 
the lands returned to the head of the family. 

(xaufred de Riddell 4 (1), third son of Patrick 3 (1), obtained a part 
of his father's lands, from which he gave many donations to the monks of 
Kelso, in the reign of Alexander II. No account of a wife or children. 
5 



66 BIDDELLS OF BOXBURGHSHIRE, SCOTLAND. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

Sir William de Riddell 6 (2), eldest son of Walter 4 (2) and his wife 
Giffard, was knighted at a very early a<;e by Alexander II. He succeeded 
to his father's property, and married Isabella, who, with himself, granted 
a considerable estate to the monks of Melrose about the year 1255, by a 
charter witnessed by their son William, which charter proves the succession 
as follows : " Uxor Wilhelmi de Riddell de alia bovata terrce in territorio de 
Whittun quam pater metis Wilhelmus, parsona de Hunam, emit a, Gan- 
fredo Coco" — the deed being made"J°ro salute animm Domini Patricii 
de Riddell, and Walter, filii ejus, et Wilhelmi, sponci mei." It was wit- 
nessed by five members of the family which proves four successive de- 
scents. The charter translated reads as follows: "Isabella, wife of Wil- 
liam of Riddell, gives this out of pasture land in the territory of Whittun, 
which my father, William, parson of Hunam, bought from Ganfred Coke, 
for the salvation of the soul of Sir Patrick de Riddell and Walter, his 
son, and William my spouse." 

Patrick de Riddell 5 (2), second son of Walter 4 (2), has left no record 
of marriage or inheritance. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

William de Riddell 6 (3), eldest son of William 5 (2), succeeded his 
father in the family estates. He was compelled to swear fealty to King 
Edward I, when he overran Scotland, and is particularly mentioned in 
the year 1296; but this laird died without issue, and was succeeded by 
his brother, of whom hereafter. 

GalfridllS de Riddell 6 (1), second son of William 5 (2), succeeded his 
brother William, before mentioned, and made many donations to the re- 
lio-ious houses of Kelso and Melrose, during the reio;n of Alexander III. 
He died about the year 1325, and was succeeded by his son, of whom 
hereafter. This ancient family name seems to be handed down as proof 
that this branch of the family was directly connected with that of Angou- 
lesme and Piragord, in France. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Sir William de Riddell 7 (4), son of Galfridus 6 (1), succeeded his 
father in the family estates, and received the honor of knighthood at the 
hand of his king, David Bruce, in whose reign he is mentioned in many 
of the chartularies and chronicles. He died in the reign of Robert II, 
and was succeeded by his son, of whom hereafter. 

Sir Robert de Riddell 7 (1), probably a brother of the preceding, was 
a witness to a charter to Kelso Abbey, of land in Mow ; and was cau- 
tioner for Mow of Mains, who was a hostage in England on account of 
border disturbances. 

Richard de Riddell 7 (1), probably a brother of the preceding, was a 
witness to two charters to John Kerr, of Auldtownburn ; dated respec- 
tively in 1357 and 1358. There is no record to prove that these last two 
Riddells had wives or children; nor that they ever held family property. 
Their names were found, as above associated, on documents in the charter 
chest at Fleurs. 

EIGHTH GENERATION. 

Quilltill de Riddell 8 (1), a son of William 7 (4), succeeded his father. 
He was certainly in possession in 1420, when a Court of Inquisition was 
held, and the Lilliesleaf lands were then called Riddell, though after that 



BIDDELLS OF R0XBUBGSH1BE, SCOTLAND. 67 

date the old favorite name sometimes crops up. The family surname, how- 
ever, had been regularly and officially given to the Lilliesleaf property 
(Whittun continuing as originally), deriving the baronial character from 
the tenure of the first charter by David I to Walter ; and hence the 
origin of the local name of Riddell, as denoting an estate that previously 
was not Scotch or known in Scotland. Quintin had a son who seems to 
have married and had issue, but died before his father; hence the succes- 
sion fell to a grandson, of whom hereafter. There was a daughter, how- 
ever, who married to John Scott, of Harden. Quintin was a new name 
in the family, and from whence derived does not appear, though the name 
of a saint in the Roman calendar. 

TENTH GENERATION. 

James Riddell 10 (1), a grandson of Quintin 8 (1), succeeded to the 
family lands as Laird of Riddell and Whittun, as early as 1493. He had 
a brother, and son, his successor, of whom hereafter. It appears, from 
documents found in Edinburgh, that this James was served heir to his 
grandfather, Quintin, at Jedburgh, the 4th of May, 1471. He married 
Margaret, daughter of Sir James Lindsay, and besides his successor, be- 
fore mentioned, he had two daughters. 

Thomas Riddell 10 (1), was a grandson of Quintin 8 (1), and brother 
of James, previously mentioned. I find no record of a family or inherit- 
ance for this man. 

ELEVENTH GENERATION. 

John Riddell 11 (1), son of James 10 (1) and Margaret Lindsay, his wife, 
succeeded his father, and was infeft in the barony of Riddell in 1510. 
He granted a precept infefting Patrick, Earl Bothwell, in a part of some 
lands in Lilliesleaf in 1584, which he held of the Laird of Riddell. John 
died in 1542, and was succeeded by his grandson. 

Margaret Riddell n (l), eldest daughter of James 10 (1), married to 
Walter Scott of Harden. 

Christian Riddell 11 (1), second daughter of James 10 (1), married to 
Walter Scott of Harden, nephew to the last named. 

TWELFTH GENERATION. 

Walter Riddell 1 " (4), eldest son of John 11 (1), and his apparent heir 
married Jane , and died before his father, leaving issue a son, who suc- 
ceeded his grandfather. 

George Riddell 1 ' 2 (1), a son of John 11 (1), is particularly mentioned in 
a legal transaction upon record affecting him. 

John Riddell 12 (2), a son of John 11 (1), was denominated " of Robine." 
I find no other account of this man. 

William Riddell 12 (5), youngest son of John 11 (1), probably died 
when young, as I find no other mention of his name. 

THIRTEENTH GENERATION. 

Walter Riddell 13 (5), eldest son of Walter 1 - (4), succeeded his grand- 
father, as previously mentioned, and was styled " of that ilk," or " de 
odem." He married Mariotta, daughter of Sir James Pringle, of Gala- 
shiels, A. D. 1543. He died in the beginning of the reign of James VI, 
and left issue three sons, of whom hereafter. 

FOURTEENTH GENERATION. 

Walter Riddell 14 (6), eldest son and heir of Walter 18 (5), was served 
to his inheritance in the year 1588. He married a daughter of Sir George 



68 MDDELLS OF ROXBUEGHSMIBE, SCOTLAND. 

Ramsey of Dalhousie, by whom he had a son and successor, of whom 
hereafter. 

Robert Riddell 14 (2), second son of Walter 13 (5), received a consider- 
able portion of his father's lands at Minto, and became ancestor of the 
« Riddells of Minto-Riddell." 

William Riddell 14 (6), youngest son of Walter 13 (5), received a portion 
of his father's landed-estates ; no other mention. 

FIFTEENTH GENERATION. 

Andrew Riddell 15 (2), son of Walter 14 (6), was served heir to his father 
in 1592, obtaining a charter March 24, 1595. He married first Miss 
Pringle, daughter of James Pringle, of Galashiels and Smailholm, his 
cousin, and after her death he espoused Violette, daughter of William 
Douglas, Esq., of Pumpberston, West-Lothian. He had issue by both 
wives, of whom hereafter. Andrew was a man of much importance, and 
having acquired Haining (signifying an enclosed grass-field) from the 
Scotts, the first possessors of that beautiful estate, held large territorial 
possessions, and was called the "Bai-on of Riddell." Though lordly in 
his possessions, he must have been a man of remarkable humility, for he was 
offered a baronetcy, which he declined. Andrew died in 1632, and was 
buried in the ancient " Riddell aisle," in the old Lilliesleaf church-yard, 
where his monuments may still be seen bearing the following inscription in 
Latin : " Here lies Andrew Riddell (de odem), who died at the age of 82, 
on the 4th of March, A. D. 1632. Long live the memory of the dead. The 
hours fly." On the same stone is the following : " His sorrowing wife, 
Violette Douglas, has erected this monument to the memory of her most 
beloved husband, Andrew Riddell, Baron of Riddell, who died in the hope 
of the resurrection of the just." There are coats-of-arms on the monu- 
ment. The will of the laird in 1552 proves the old burial place of the 
family, called the "Riddell aisle," to have been in the choir of the church. 
There is another stone, no doubt belonging to the family, with no in- 
scription save the words " Pray for the soul." The present church, a 
plain structure, stands outside the church-yard wall ; it was erected in 
1771. 

SIXTEENTH GENERATION. 

Sir John Riddell 10 (3), eldest son of Andrew 15 (2), by his wife Pringle, 
Mas a man of considerable talent, and obtained the honor of a baronetcy, 
which was refused by his father ; this was conferred on the 14th of May, 
1628, about three years after the institution of the order in Scotland. 
This John was also knighted at an early age. He married first, Agnes, 
daughter of Sir John Murray, of Blackbarrony, by Margaret, daughter of 
Sir Alexander Hamilton, of lnnerwick, the oldest branch of the Hamiltons. 
This alliance connected the house of Riddell with many of the most 
illustrious families in Scotland, for Margaret had a sister married to Sir 
Robert Kerr, the first Earl of Ancrum, another sister to Sir Robert Halhet, 
of Pitferran, a third to Patrick Murray, of Phillipshaugh, a fourth to Sir 
Patrick Scott, of Thirlstane, besides two others married to Sir James 
Douglas, of Colphople, and to Veitch of Dawick. Sir John married 
secondly, Jane, daughter of Sir James Anstruther, of Anstruther, relict of 
James Douglas, commendator of Melrose, who was second son of the Earl 
of Morton. By the second marriage Sir John had a daughter whose name 
does not appear, married to David Barclay, Esq., of Colernie, in the 
County of Fife. At his creation in 1628, Sir John received a part of a 



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RIDDELLS OF ROXBURGHSHIRE, SCOTLAND. 60 

territory in Nova Scotia,* under the name of the " Barony of New 
Riddell." I have not learned what disposition the family made of this 
land. Sir John had issue six children, of whom hereafter. 

William Riddell 10 (7), second son of Andrew 15 (2), inherited the 
landed estate known as "Newhouse," and became ancestor of the "Rid- 
dells of Newhouse," about whom there has been so many opinions ex- 
pressed by genealogists. See article in this book under above designation. 
He also got a charter of Muselee in 1618, and became ancestor of that 
branch of the family. 

James Riddell 16 (2), third son of Andrew 15 (2), was denominated "of 
Maybole." I have no other account of this man, but may presume that 
he became ancestor of some of the junior branches of the Roxburghshire 
Riddells — possibly was ancestor of the late Robert Riddell, father of 
Henry-Scott Riddell, the Shepherd Poet of Tiviothead. I have not found 
the "missing link," but the families always claimed relationship. 

Walter Riddell 16 (7), fourth son of Andrew 15 (2), received from his 
father the lands of Hartride. I have no other mention. 

Andrew Riddell 16 (3), was a "favorite son" of Andrew 15 (2), by 
Violette Douglas, his second wife, and received from his father the 
beautiful estate called " Haining " in Selkirkshire. This property con- 
tinued in this branch of the family till the beginning of the seventeenth 
centurv, when it was sold to the second son of Prinze of Clifton. 
Andrew's monument is in the " Riddell aisle," bearing the inscription, 
" whose life was short and good." His wife was a Stewart of Traquair, 
and her husband having died young she married secondly Sir William 
Douglas, ancestor of the Marquis of Queensbury. Andrew left one son, 
his successor. See " Riddells of Haining." 

Margaret Riddell 16 (2), eldest daughter of Andrew 15 (2), married, 
Robert Rutherford, Esq., of Edgerston. 

Isabel Riddell 16 (1), third daughter of Andrew 15 (2), married to Robert 
Kerr, a brother of Sir Thomas, of Cavers. Two of her sisters married 
respectively, John Bailie, ancestor of the Baillies of Wellerstaiu, and Sir 
John Scott, of Goldielands, while the last and fifth sister lived and died 
unmarried. 

Jean Riddell 16 (1), a daughter of Andrew 15 (2), was born in 1600, and 
died a maiden lady in 1660. She was buried in the Abbey burying-ground 
at Jedburgh, f where her monument stands, bearing the following inscrip- 
tion : " Here lies a religious and virtuous gentlewoman, Jean Riddell, 
daughter of Sir Andrew Riddell of that ilk, who died in the year of God, 
MDCLX, and of her age 60. 



♦John Riddell, of New Riddell, received a grant of 16,000 acres of land in the 
Island of Anticosti, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, dated May 14, 1628, and unlike 
many other baronets took seizen of his grant — i. e., took it up, but does not appear 
to have made any use of it. Presumed to have been forfeited by the effluxions of 
time. — Nova Scotia Records. 

Baronets of Scotland charge their coat armour with the arms of Nova Scotia, the 
order having been founded to promote the plantation of that province. 

t Jedburgh Abbey was founded by King David I, about 1130 A. D. Of this 
once magnificent structure, the church,— two hundred and thirty feet long, — alone 
remains. The abbey was rifled and burned in 1523 by the Earl of Surrey, and again 
by the Earl of Hertford, in 1544. To preserve the beautiful abbey from complete 
ruin, it was repaired with judicious regard to its ancient architectural designs, a few 
years ago. This spot is every year visited by hundreds of travelers. I think the 
stone to the memory of Jean Riddell was discovered by Walter Riddell-Carre, Esq., 
late of Cavers Carre. 



70 BIDDELLS OF BOXBTJBGHSHIBE, SCOTLAND. 

" She lived a holy life, 

To Christ resigned her breath. 
Her soul is now with God, 
Triumphing over death!" 

SEVENTEENTH GENERATION. 

Sir Walter Riddell" (8), eldest son of Sir John 16 (3), was knighted by 
King Charles, during his father's lifetime. He succeeded to the baronial 
estates, and married a very pious woman, Janet Rigg, the daughter of a 
worthy and godly man, William Kigg, of Aithernie, Fifeshire, by whom 
he \y.\(\five sons and two daughters. Janet Rigg, Lady Riddell, was not 
only pious, but accomplished, and her father was a man of high principle 
and character, and moreover extremely wealthy. Mr. Rigg was fined 
£50,000 Scots, for opposing the introduction of the Five Articles at Perth, 
by James IV, and also suffered imprisonment in Blackness Castle. His 
sister, the aunt of Lady Riddell, Miss Catherine Rigg, who married 
Douglas, of Cavers, w r as the celebrated Covenanter, and the ladies were 
descendants of Dr. John Row, of Perth, John Knox's coadjutor. Walter 
was succeeded by his son. 

Sir William' Riddell 17 (8), second son of Sir John 16 (3), was made a 
knight at an early age, and became governor of Desborough, in Holland. 
He married Windelina Van Bucham, by whom he had a daughter, married 
to Nicholas Bowyer, Esq. ; her name was Anna-Catherine; also other issue. 

Capt. John Kiddell 17 (4), third son of Sir John 16 (3), was an officer in 
the service of Holland. 

Capt. Thomas Riddell 17 (2), fourth son of Sir John 10 (3), was also an 
officer in the service of Holland. 

EIGHTEENTH GENERATION. 

Sir JollU Riddell 18 (5), eldest son and successor of Sir Walter 17 (8), 
was third Baronet of Riddell. He was called in the family Sir John 
Bluebeard, because he had four wives, not at once of course, like Brigham 
Young. He married Dec. 9, 1659, to Agnes, daughter of Gideon Scott, of 
Harden, who dying without issue, he married secondly in November, 1661, 
to Helen, daughter of Sir Alexander Morrison, of Preston Grange, by 
Jean his wife, daughter of Robert, Lord Boyd. By this union there were a 
son and daughter, of whom hereafter. He married thirdly, in October, 
1669, Margaret Swinton, of Swinton, by whom he had a son and a 
daughter. He married fourthly, Mrs. Watt, of Rosehill, whose maiden 
name had been Hepburn. Sir John inherited his mother's religious zeal, 
and became a zealous Covenanter, and suffered imprisonment for his 
defence of civil and religious liberty and his non-conformity. He Avas at 
this time a member of parliament for Roxburghshire, and was prosecuted 
for defending his brother, who was a distinguished preacher. He got a re- 
mission in 1687, from the king, and died in 1700, a very short time after 
his fourth marriage, and was succeeded by his son, of whom hereafter. 

William Riddell 1 " (9), second son of Walter 17 (8), had bestowed upon 
him the lands of Friarshaw, in Dumfrieshire, and became ancestor of the 
"Riddells of Glen-Riddell," in that county. He married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Capt. Francis Wauchope, of the Middev family. See " Glen- 
Riddell." 

Rev. Archibald Riddell 1 " (1), third son of Walter 17 (8), the second 
Baronet, was educated for the church, and became ancestor of the "Rid- 
dells of Grant-on," whom see. 



RIDDELLS OF ROXBURGHSHIRE, SCOTLAND, 71 

Thomas Riddell 18 (3), fourth son of Walter 17 (8), married to Agnes 
Scott. No other mention. 

Andrew Riddell 18 (4), fifth son of Walter 17 (8), married, and had 
issue one daughter, of whom hereafter. 

Margaret Riddell 18 (3), a daughter of Walter 17 (8), married to the 
Rev. Geo. Semple, of Jedburgh ; another authority says, "C. Semple, Esq." 

Allison Riddell 18 (1), a daughter of Walter 17 (8), married to George 
Home, Esq., of Barrendean ; another authority says, " a brother of Sir 
William Scott, of Mourton." Possibly both. 

Richard Riddell 18 (2), a son of Sir William 17 (8), of Holland. 
Anna-Catherine Riddell 18 (1), a daughter of William 17 (8), married 
to Nicholas Bowyer, Esq. 

NINETEENTH GENERATION. 

Sir Walter Riddell 19 (9), eldest son of Sir John 18 (8), became the 
fourth baronet, and inherited the family estates. He married Margaret, 
daughter of John Watt, of Rosehill, who was also a daughter of his step- 
mother, and had issue Jioe sons and three daughters. Sir Walter was a 
very godly man, and seems to have fully imbibed the piety of his father 
and grandmother, whose spirit and habits were characteristic of him. He 
was a great lover of the Scriptures, and was very zealous of their inter- 
pretation. He was once attending the preaching of his own son Robert, 
who was minister of Lilliesleaf, when thinking he was not presenting the 
claims and terms of the gospel correctly, he stopped him with the words, 
" Robert, that won't do." He was recommended to stop so many people 
coming upon his property, but his answer was, " The earth is the Lord's." 
In his days the public road passed close to the back of Riddell House, and 
its nearness to the kind-hearted baronet's mansion, must have induced 
a good many " seekers," as beggars were then called, to intrude upon his 
premises. He died in 1747, and was succeeded by his second son. 

Christian Riddell 19 (2), eldest daughter of John 18 (8), married Henry, 
eldest son of Sir Patrick Nisbet of Dean. 

William Riddell 19 (10), youngest son of Sir John 18 (8), died in 1700, 
sine prole. His mother was Margaret Swinton, the third wife of Sir 
John Riddell. 

Margaret Riddell 19 (4), youngest daughter of Sir John 18 (8), was by 
his third wife, Margaret Swinton. 

TWENTIETH GENERATION. 

John Riddell' 20 (9), eldest son of Walter 19 (9), was remarkable for his 
talents and accomplishments as an advocate, but predeceased his father at 
an early age, unmarried. 

( Sir Walter Riddell 20 (10), second son of Walter 19 (9), succeeded as 
fifth baronet, in consequence of his elder brother's predeceasing his 
father. He was in early life a merchant at Eyemouth, probably a dealer 
in fish and spirits, brandy being largely imported there. He married Jane, 
daughter of J. Turnbull, Esq., of Houndwood, near Eyemouth ; it was a 
runaway marriage, but the lady had neither money nor rank ; the rank was 
on Walter's side, but as he was at the time only a merchant, the Turn- 
bulls may have looked down upon him. He died in the year 1765, having 
had issue Jioe sons and one daughter, of whom hereafter. He was suc- 
ceeded by his second son. 



72 BIDDELLS OF ROXBURGHSHIRE, SCOTLAND. 

Thomas Riddell 20 (4), third son of Walter 19 (9), became ancestor of 
the " Riddells of Camieston," whose history consult. 

William Riddell 20 (11), fourth son of Walter 19 (9), went to Bermuda, 
in the West Indies, and became ancestor of a small branch family, which 
soon became extinct in the male line. One of this family seems to have 
been an eminent physician, and wrote a medical thesis which showed a 
desire to do good. 

Rev. Robert Riddell' 20 (3), fifth son of Walter 19 (9), married Esther, 
daughter of Dr. John Riddell, of Edinburgh, his kinswoman, but had no is- 
sue. He was minister of Lilliesleaf, and was sometimes interrupted during 
his discourses by his father, the baronet, who was a very exact critic. 

Eleiior Riddell 20 (1), eldest daughter of Walter 19 (9), married to 
Robert Carre, Esq., of Cavers Carre. 

Sarah Riddell' 20 (1), second daughter of Walter 19 (9), married to John 
Forest. 

Christian Riddell 20 (3), third daughter of Walter 19 (9), died young, 
and unmarried. 

TWENTY-FIRST GENERATION. 

Walter Riddell' 21 (11), eldest son of Walter- (10), was a captain in 
the service of the States of Holland; died unmarried before his father, 
hence did not succeed. 

Sir John Riddell' 21 (10), second son of Walter 20 (10), succeeded as 
sixth baronet. Being second son, he was shipped off to Curacoa, where 
he was a merchant, but coming home before his father's death, married 
Jane, daughter of James Buchanan, Esq., of Sunden, in the County of 
Bedford, to whose estates she succeeded on the death of her brother, 
Archibald Buchanan, Esq., in the year 1772. He died about three years 
after he succeeded to the title and estates, at Hamstead, in Middlesex, the 
16th of April, 1768, leaving issue three sons, the youngest of whom was 
posthumous 

Col. James Riddell' 21 (2), third son of Walter- (10), was commissioned 
a lieutenant-colonel in the Dutch service. He was represented as "a 
fine-looking man." He died advanced in life, but unmarried, in 1804. 

Andrew Riddell 21 (5), fourth son of Walter' 20 (10), died unmarried. 

Capt. Thomas Riddell 21 (5). fifth son of Walter- (10), became 
ancestor of the " Riddells of Beesborough," for an account of whom, see 
department in this book under that head. 

Jane Riddell 21 (1), only daughter of Walter 20 (10), married to John 
Carre, Esq., of Cavers Carre, Roxburghshire. 

TWENTY-SECOND GENERATION. 

Sir Walter RiddelP (12), eldest son of Sir John 21 (10), succeeded 
his father in 1768, and died in the seventeenth year of his age, Feb. 7, 
1784. He was succeeded by his brother. 

Sir James-Buchanan Riddell 22 (3), second son of John 21 (10), was 
an officer in the First Regiment of Foot Guards, and was drowned at 
Brunswick while bathing in the river, Sept. 4th, 1784, only a few months 
after succeeding to the title and estates of the family. Succeeded by his 
brother. 

Sir John-Buchanan Riddell 2 ' 2 (3), third son of John 21 (10), succeeded' 
his brother as ninth baronet in 17S4. He married August 17, 1805, 
Frances, eldest daughter of Charles, Earl of Efcomney, and granddaughter, 
maternally, of the Earl of Egremont. He was a member of parliament 



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BIDDELLS OF ROXBUBGHSHIRE, SCOTLAXD. 73 

for the burghs of Selkirk and Lanark, and died in the prime of life, and 
in the midst of incomplete plans, April, 1819, aged 51 years, leaving issue 
four sons and/?ue daughters, of whom hereafter. He was succeeded by 
his eldest son the present baronet, the tenth in succession. Sir John was 
one of the most devoted agriculturalists the country ever knew ; but in 
carrying forward his improvements on an extensive scale, he seems to 
have been lavish in his outlay, and became so involved, that after his 
death the estate of " Rid dell- Whittun," which had so long been in the 
possesssion of the old family, was sold. Many of the beautiful trees on 
the lawn and about the grounds were planted by Sir John, and many 
changes and improvements remain to prove his interest in, and passionate 
love for, agricultural pursuits. 

He was a man of commanding person, and elegant though stiff manners, 
and as the representative of an old and long line of ancestry, he was 
doubly respected. His business habits were good, but his affairs became 
confused, and the property upon which he bestowed so much money was 
lost to his descendants. High farming and extensive improvements con- 
tributed to his troubles ; but in pushing his gigantic schemes, he was a 
great benefactor of the working classes, to whom he gave extensive 
employment, and the present proprietor is reaping the rich benefits of Sir 
John's immense expenditure. As this article will close our immediate 
connection with the old estate so long held, it will be proper to give some 
description of Lilliesleaf at the time it passed out of the hands of the Rid- 
dell family. Lilliesleaf is a parish in the northwest division of Roxburgh- 
shire, bounded on the northwest by a part of Selkirkshire parish ; on the 
north by Bowden ; on the east by Ancrum ; on the south by Minto, and a 
detached part of Selkirkshire ; and on the west by Ashkirk. Its extreme 
length from east to west is five miles ; its mean breadth is about two miles 
and a furlong; and its area is upwards of seven thousand acres. A small 
stream called Ale water, remarkable for the fine quality of its trout, forms 
for half a mile the southern boundary; flows three miles northeasterly 
through the interior, runs three miles debouchingly along the northern 
and eastern boundaries, and passes away eastward into Ancrum creek. 
Several broad, low ridges, and waving alternations of slope and valley, 
diversify the surface of the parish; and though all is capable of cultiva- 
tion, and at one time subject to the plough, it is now distributed into 
nearly equal proportions of arable lands and pasture. About six hundred 
acres are planted, and about fifty are mossy and waste. The soil is partly 
light sand, partly clay, and partly a rich loam. Two marl-pits have given 
up much treasure to the arable land. At the death of Sir John Riddell, 
in 1819, his extensive lands, which had been nearly all disposed in arable 
farms, were laid out in grass. This is the place commemoi-ated by Sir 
Walter Scott, in the lines : — 

" Ancient Riddells' fair domain, 
Where Ale, from mountains freed, 
Down from the lakes did raving come; 
Each wave was crested with tawny foam, 
Like the mane of a chestnut steed." 

Although the family possessed the estate long enough to entitle the 
great poet to call it "ancient Riddell," their title did not sustain the 
highly, complimentary note connection with the first line of the above 
verse. The Riddell family held possession from about 1120 to 1823, in all 
six hundred and seventy years. Scott endeavors to establish the family 



74 BIDDELLS OF B0XBUBGHSH1BE, SCOTLAND. 

as domiciled at Riddell, long previous to the time they acquired it, and 
mentions the date on the aisle of the old churchyard as being 1110. There 
are memorials cut in the south wall, but they do not possess a sufficiently 
antiquated character to represent a period so far back, though these figures 
may have been re-cut in after times. There was an ancient church or 
chapel on the Wester Lilliesleaf or Riddell estate, said to have stood near 
an old ash-tree not far from the last gate leading from the Eastern 
Lodge to the mansion-house, not far south from the old castle which stood 
in the wood a little above where the old Lilliesleaf road to Selkirk passed. 
At what period the ancient castle, which was probably a place of great 
strength and security, was built, it would be impossible to say ; but it 
seems probable that the family erected it very soon after acquiring the 
property in the twelfth century. It is also difficult to prove when the 
present " Riddell House " superseded the old castle as a residence, 
though it gives evidence of great antiquity. When the present proprietor 
was preparing to enlarge the ancient house, he erected in the western side 
of the old mansion, an antiquated stone with the Riddell arms on one 
side of the shield, and what was supposed to be the arms of the Kerrs on 
the other side, though the stars are not on a chevron according to the 
regular cognizance. This stone is evidently about four hundred years 
old, and represents an alliance between members of the families of Rid- 
dell and Kerr, which actually occurred about that date. An arch was 
discovered at the same time, that gave evidence of great antiquity, 
especially the walls from their hardness, probably caused by using hot 
lime, as was common in olden times. The aisle in the old church-yard, 
which was not reserved when the property was sold, but which was 
generously restored by the purchaser, was used as a burial-place for the 
family very early, but how early there is no authority to prove. No doubt 
they were buried somewhere on the estate from their first settlement, 
probably at the first chapel, as bones have been dug up there in years past; 
but in process of time the aisle came to be used, in fact when it was part 
of the old church, which stood till 1771, the year of the erection of the 
present one. The choir of the old church was just where the aisle of the 
present one now stands. Whether this ancient church was the original one, 
cannot be known ; but it was evidently a pre-reformation one, and it was 
thatched with broom, as was the custom in olden times. " It is to be 
lamented," says one of the family in Scotland, " that at the sale of the fine 
old place, the name of Riddell, which was given to it by the family after 
themselves — a very unusual thing in the history of proprietors — had not 
been changed, and a new name awarded, or the old one of Wester Lillies- 
leaf restored. I have no doubt that the several distinguished branches of 
the old family, whose ancestors for several centuries enjoyed an unmolested 
and unbroken possession of the dear uld place, find its name now a 
source of melancholy and unpleasant reflection." 

The widow of Sir John Riddell, the last family proprietor of Riddell, 
who was born Oct. 25, 1778, died July 1, 1868, at the great age of ninety 
years. She was a woman of great character, and highly respected for her 
quiet manners and amiable deportment. She was descended from Sir 
John Maisham, who had been called " the great Maisham of England." 

TWENTY-THIRD GENERATION. 

Sir Walter-Buchanan Riddell 38 (13), eldest son of John" 2 (11), suc- 
ceeded to the baronetcy at the death of his father in 1819. He was born 



BIDDELLS OF BOXBUBGHSHIBE, SCOTLAND. 75 



at " Riddell House," Roxburghshire, in 1810; married in 1859, Alicia, 
youngest daughter of the late William Ripley, Esq., formerly of the Fifty- 
second Regiment. He was educated at Eton and Oxford ; took his 
degree of B. A. in 1831, that of M. A. in 1834. He was called to the 
bar at Lincoln's Inn in 1834; is now a magistrate for Kent, Northumber- 
land ; judge of the Metropolitan County Courts, and late recorder of 
Maidstone. He has been a member of parliament. Sir Walter's seat is 
at Hepple, Northumberland, a property that came to the family from the 
Buchanans, said to be a beautiful place. He spends much of his time 
in London. As he has no issue, his heir presumptive is John-Walter, 
eldest son of Rev. John B, Riddell, who will probably eventually suc- 
ceed. Sir Walter has manifested a deep interest in this book, and has 
very kindly assisted the author in many ways. In reply to an invitation 
to attend the family meeting held in Philadelphia in 1876, he says: " It 
would have much gratified and interested me, had it been in my power to 
have visited this proposed family gathering, and also to have witnessed 
the great exhibition now in progress at Philadelphia, to which Lady 
Riddell and I have received most kind and pressing invitations from old 
friends resident in that city. But I am sorry to say that my judicial duties 
in London prevent my leaving England, besides that I am rather old to 
begin with the ' New World,' as your mighty continent used to be called 
before the new career of the United States commenced one hundred years 
ago. I hope that your genealogical work, with reference to which I have 
had much interesting correspondence with you, is progressing satisfac- 
torily, and that the proposed family gathering will secure the publication 
of a family history, in which, if I may presume to consider myself the 
head of the family, I may deem myself specially concerned and interested. 
I beg you to present my compliments and the expressions of my hearty 
good will to the president and gentlemen of the committee arranging the 
meeting, as well as to the members of the old family and its branches 
who may attend it, and also to express my great regrets that I am unable 
to join the assembly." 

Rev. Johu-Charles-R. Riddell 3 (12), second son of John- 2 (11), 
was born in 1814; married April 16, 1846, Frances-Sophia, daughter 
of the late George-James Chalmondly, Esq., and his wife, the Countess 
Dowager of Romney. He was educated at Eton ; M. A. of Christ 
Church, Oxford, and late Fellow of All Souls' College. He was rector of 
Harrietsham, Kent, and Hon. Canon of Canterbury. Mr. Riddell was his 
brother Walter's heir presumptive to the baronetcy ; he had issue eight 
children, of whom hereafter. Deceased. 

Gen. Charles-James Riddell'- 3 (1), third son of John 2 ' 2 (11), was 
born in 1816; married in 1847 (Feb. 11th), Mary, second daughter of 
Lieut.-Gen. Sir Hugh-Dalrymple Ross, K. C. B., and has issue a daughter. 
He bears the title R. A., C. B. 

Gen. Henry-Philip-A. Riddell 23 (1), fourth son of John 2 ' 2 (11), was 
born in 1819. I have no record of his marriage. He was educated at 
Eton and Haileybury college; was formerly in the Bengal service, and 
a member of the Legislative Council of India ; is a magistrate for 
Northumberland. His services under the government have been rec- 
ognized by the presentation of the medal styled the " Star of India,"* 

* Description of the " Star of India " — The, Star. — Rays of gold issuing from 
a centre, having thereon a star in diamonds, resting upon a light blue enameled 



76 BIDDELLS OF ROXBURGHSHIRE, SCOTLAND. 

the highest bestowed for civil services under the crown. He got a com- 
panionship and the designation of C. S. I. Mr. Riddel] was in the "Old 
East India Company," and was at one time Postmaster-General of India. 
He has been a most useful public servant, a man of remarkable ability and 
energy of character. See his portrait in the group with his brother, Sir 
Walter, in this book. His seat is Whitefield House, Rothbury, North- 
umberland, in England, a place he rents of his brother, the baronet. 

Frances-Jane Riddell 23 (1), eldest daughter of John- (11), was born 
Aug. 6, 1806, in Edinburgh, Scotland; died in 1869. 

Harriet Riddel!* 3 (1), second daughter of John' 22 (11), was born at 
Ridded House, Roxburghshire, Aug. 29, 1808.. 

Emily Riddel! 23 (1), third daughter of John' 22 (11), was born Nov. 19, 
1808 ; married Dec. 21, 1843, to John Adams, Esq., a barrister-at-law 
(deceased), son of Mr. Sergeant Adams. 

Jane Riddel!" 3 (2), fourth daughter of John 22 (11), was born sub- 
sequent to 1810, and before 1819. No other mention. 

Charlotte-Mary Riddell 23 (1), youngest daughter of John 22 (11), was 
born subsequent to 1810, died in 1869. 

TWENTY-FOURTH GENERATION. 

John-Walter Riddel! 24 (13), eldest son of John' 23 (12), and his wife 
Frances-Sophia, was born March 14, 1849; married in August, 1874, Sarah- 
Isabel, youngest daughter of the late Robert Wharton, Esq., and has issue, 
of whom hereafter. He was educated at Eton, and Christ's Church, 
Oxford. He will eventually (should he outlive his uncle) succeed as 
eleventh baronet. He is in London with his uncle Walter. 

Robert-George Riddel! 24 (4), second son of John' 23 (12), and his wife, 
Frances-Sophia, was born Sept. 15, 1854; lieutenant Sixtieth Rifles. 

Charles-Sidney Riddel! 24 (2), third son of John' 23 (12), was born 
Auo-. 30, 1858. 

Henry-Edward Riddel! 24 (2), fourth son of John 23 (12), was born 

Jan. 25, 1860 ; officer Royal Camanian Militia. 

Franees-Mary Riddell 24 (2), eldest daughter of John' 28 (12). 
Mary-Amelia Riddell 24 (1), second daughter of John' 23 (12). 
Sophia-Anna Riddell 24 (1), third daughter of John 23 (12). 
Margaret-Charlotte Riddel! 24 (4), fourth daughter of John' 23 (12). 

Mary-Frances Riddell 24 (2), only daughter of Charles' 23 (1). 

TWENTY-FIFTH GENERATION. 

Katherine Riddel! 25 (1), eldest daughter of John' 24 (13), born Nov- 
25, 1875. 

circular ribbon, tied at the ends, inscribed with the motto of the order, viz: — 
"Heaven's Light our Guide." also in diamonds. The Collar — Composed of the 
Lotus of India, of palm-branches, tied together in saltier, and of the united red and 
white rose. In the centre is an imperial crown; all richly enameled in gold, in 
their proper colors. The Badge. — An onyx cameo of Her Majesty's effigy, set in a 
perforated and ornamented oval, containing the motto of the order, " Heaven's 
Light our Guide," surmounted by a star, all in diamonds. The ribbon of the order 
is sky blue, having a narrow white band toward either side, and is worn from tin- 
right shoulder to the left side. The Mantle — Light blue satin, lined with white, 
and fastened with a cordon of white silk, with blue and silver tassels, on the left 
vide a representation of the Star of the order. This decoration is conferred upon 
persons who have, by service and conduct in the Indian Empire, merited the royal 
favor. 



U ID I) ELLS OF MUSE LEE. SCOTLAND. 77 

Olive-Frances Riddell 25 (1), second daughter of John 24 (13), born 
May 29, 1877. 

Walter-Robert Riddell' 25 (14), son of John' 24 (13), born April 21, 
1879 (as per books), " 1883 " as per his father's letter. 



RIDDELLS OF MUSELEE, SCOTLAND. 

William Riddell 1 (1), a son of Andrew 15 (2), the powerful old baron 
and father of the first Baronet of Riddell, became ancestor of the "Rid- 
dells of Newhouse," and of the "Riddells of Muselee." The first prop- 
erty was bestowed by his father; that of Muselee was chartered to him in 
1018, and a descendant acquired Bewlie, and both properties continued as 
a family possession. William married Bessie Ainsley and had issue, of 

whom hereafter. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

John Riddell 2 (1), a son of William 1 (1), succeeded to the property of 
Muselee and Bewlie and became representative of this branch family. He 
married first, Elizabeth Haliburton, and secondly, Grizel, daughter of Rev. 
P. Schew ; by the latter he had two sons and three daughters. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

William Riddell 3 (2), eldest son of John 2 (1) and Grizel, his wife, pre- 
deceased his father when young. 

Patrick Riddell 3 (1), second son of John 2 (1) and Grizel, his wife, suc- 
ceeded as representative of this family to Muselee and Bewlie. He mar- 
ried Maria, daughter of Thomas Elliott, ancestor of the Elliotts of Beech- 
wood, and by her had issue two sons and three daughters. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

John Riddell 4 (2), eldest son of Patrick 8 (1) and his wife Maria, suc- 
ceeded to the property and headship of this family. He married in 1706 
Margaret, daughter of Walter Riddell, Esq., of Lilliesleaf, by whom he had 
eight sons and three daughters, of whom hereafter. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

Patrick Riddell 5 (2), eldest son of John 4 (2), succeeded to the prop- 
erty and representation of this family, and married in 1752 Margaret, 
daughter of Charles Balfour, Esq., of Broadmeadows, and had issue six 
sons and a daughter. 

Walter Riddell 5 (1), second son of John 4 (2). 

Andrew Riddell 5 (1), third son of John 4 (2). 

William Riddell 5 (3), fourth son of John 4 (2), settled at Berwick-on- 
Tweed. See " Riddells of Berwick." 

Barbara Riddell 5 (1), eldest daughter of John 4 (2). 

John Riddell 5 (3), fifth son of John 4 (2). 

Alexander Riddell 5 (1), sixth son of John 4 (2). 

James Riddell 5 (1), seventh son of John 4 (2). 

Mary Riddell 5 (2), second daughter of John 4 (2). 

Thomas Riddell 5 (1), eighth son of John 4 (2), settled at Berwick-on- 
Tweed. See "Riddells of Berwick." 



HIDDELL8 OF BERWICK-ON-TWEED. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 

flfaj. Charles Biddell 6 (1), eldest son of Patrick 6 (2), succeeded to 
the estates and representation of this family, and was a major of militia. 
He was for many years chamberlain to the Duke of Buccleuch, at Branx- 
holm; he died unmarried Dec. 11, 1849, aged 95 years, and was succeeded 
by his In-other, of whom hereafter. 

Walter Riddell" (2), second sun of Patrick 6 (2)> succeeded as repre- 
sentative of this family in 1849, at the death of his brother before men- 
tioned, lie married a Miss Summerville, and had issue two children, of 
whom hereafter. He was employed as a writer at Jedburgh: DOW dead. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Mary Riddell 7 (1), a daughter of Walter (1), was heiress and became 
representative of the family. She married George Hutton, Esq., son of 
George-William Hutton, Esq., of Carlton-on-Trent, by Frances, daughter 
of Bertram Mitford, Esq., of Mitford, in 1855. Mi-. Hutton was born in 
1807, succeeded in 1835, and assuming the additional name of Riddell 
became the representative of the family. His wife Mary died, and he mar- 
ried secondly, Hannah-Elizabeth, widow of J. O. Lambert, Esq., and after 
her death he married thirdly, in 1862, Janetta-Gonville Bromhead, Baroness, 
ami has by the former, with other issue, a son, his successor. Mr. Ilutton- 
Riddell is a magistrate for Notts, Carlton-on-Trent. His address was 
Newark Notts, Windham Club. 

EIGHTH GENERATION. 

Capt. George-William Hutton-Riddell 8 (1), eldest son of the late 
George-William Hutton, Esq., who assumed the additional name of Rid- 
dell when he married Mary Riddell, the heiress of Muselee, who died in 
1871. He was born in 1836; succeeded his mother and assumed the name 
of Riddell in 1852; married in 1877 Lady Evelyn-Mary, second daughter 
of William, second Earl of Cravan. Mr. Riddell was educated at Rugby; 
was late captain of the Sixteenth Lancers. Address, Muselee, Hawick, 
X. B., Newport Lodge, Melton Mowbray. 

Edward-3Iitford Hutton-Riddell 5 (1), second sou of the late George 
Hutton, Esq., and Mary, his wife, who was the daughter of Walter Rid- 
dell, Esq, of Jedburgh, was born in 1845; married in 1872 Annie-Sophia, 
youngest daughter of Godfrey Tallents, Esq., of Newark Xotts, and has 
issue a daughter. Mr. Riddell is a magistrate for Notts ; his address, 
Carlton-on-Trent, Newark Notts, Windham Club, S. W. 



RIDDELLS OF BERWICK-ON-TWEED. 

William Riddell 1 (1), was the fourth son of John 4 (2) (see "Rid- 
dells of Muselee ") and his wife Mary, daughter of Walter Riddell, Eso... 

of Lilliesleaf. He married Mary, daughter of Mark , and had issue, 

three sons, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddell was a successful merchant at 
Ber wick-on-T wee 1 . 

Thomas Riddell 1 (1), was the eighth son of .John 4 (2), and his wife, 
Mary Riddell (brother of the preceding). He married in February. 1766, 
Mary, daughter of Joseph Crosby, Esq., and had issue Hx children, of 



IUDDELLS OF BEttWICK-OX-TWEED. 



whom hereafter. Mr. Riddell was a prominent and wealthy merchant at 
Berwick-on-Tweed. He died on Nov. 10, 1803. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

John Riddell 2 (1), eldest son of William 1 (1), died young. 
Mark Riddell" (1), second son of William 1 (1), died unmarried. 
William Riddell 2 (2), third son of William 1 (1), married Anne Mark, 
but died without issue. 



Katherine Riddell 2 (1), eldest daughter of Thomas 1 (1), married in 
February, 1803, to John Lowther, Esq., but died issueless. 

Margaret Riddell 2 (1), second daughter of Thomas 1 (1), died when 
young, unmarried. 

John Riddell 2 (2), eldest son of Thomas 1 (1), died unmarried. 

Capt. Joseph-Crosby Riddell 2 (1), second son of Thomas 1 (1), was 
an officer in the army; died in 1833, unmarried. 

George Riddell 2 (1), third son of Thomas 1 (1), died an infant. 

Capt. George Riddell 2 (2), fourth son of Thomas 1 (1), married, Jan. 
22, 1801, Elizabeth-Frances, daughter of Robert Edmerston, and had issue 
eight children, of whom hereafter. He was an officer in the army ; died 
in October, 1823. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Rev. Thomas Riddell 3 (2), eldest son of George 2 (2), was Fellow of 
Trinity College, Cambridge, England, and Vicar of Masham. He died 
Sept. 30,' 1855, unmarried. 

Mary Riddell 3 (2), eldest daughter of George 2 (2), died unmarried. 

Robert-Edmerstoil Riddell 3 (1), second son of George 2 (2), died young. 

John-Alexander Riddell 3 (3), third son of George 2 (2), was a lieu- 
tenant in the Royal Navy; died unmarried. 

Elenor-Grace Riddeil 3 (1), second daughter of George 2 (2), died un- 
married. 

Margaret-Crosby Riddell 3 (2), third daughter of George 2 (2), mar- 
ried in 1855 to the Rev. J. A. Carter-Squire, and had one son; she died 
Dec. 6, 1864. 

AVilliam-EdmerstOn Riddell 3 (3), fourth son of George 2 (2), married 
Sept. 17, 1872, Mary, youngest daughter of James Forster, Esq., of Ber- 
wick, and had issue tv)0 sons ; died May 29, 1876. 

Elizabeth-Frances Riddell 3 (1), youngest daughter of George 2 (2), 
was a maiden lady, resident at Berwick-on-Tweed; died Oct. 8, 1873. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Walter-James Riddell 4 (2), eldest sou of William 3 (3), was born July 
25, 1873. 

William-Edmerston Riddell 4 (4), second son of William 3 (3), was born 
Dec. 20, 1874. 

* In 1293 there was a Phillipus de Rydall, merchant of Berwick, who was trad- 
ing within the kingdom of England. Another de Ridell was a burgess at Ber- 
wick-on-Tweed, in the middle of the fourteenth century. Thomas de Ridell was 
at Berwick in 1615 ; he was senior burgess ..." die Sabb 12° mens Jan. A. D. mill 
trescent quinquag Oct.°." The testator names among his legatees his " nepos," 
Alexander de Riclell. together with William, son, and Agnes, daughter, of the said 
Alexander. Among his bequests he gives " Ave pounds to the building of the stone 
bridge of Tweed, at Rokisburgh," and "a donation to the abbott and convent of 
Kelkow" (Kelso). 



80 RIDDELLS OF GLEN-RIDDELL, SCOTLAND. 



RIDDELLS OF GLEN-RIDDELL, SCOTLAND. 

Walter RiddelT (1), first of Glen-Riddell, was son of William 18 (9), 
styled "of Friarshaw," and grandson of Sir Walter, second Baronet 
of Riddell, and his wife, Jane Rigg. He married Catherine, daughter of 
Sir Robert Laurie, Bart., and having purchased Gilmerston, otherwise 
Snade, he named it Glen-Riddell,* and made it his residence. His mar- 
riage was in the year 1694; he had issue two (perhaps more) sons, of whom 
hereafter 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Robert Riddell 2 (1), eldest son of Walter 1 (1), was his successor to 
Glen-Riddell. He married Jean, daughter of Alexander Ferguson, of 
Craigdorroch, and had issue a numerous family of sons and <laughters (one 
authority says three sons and seven daughters), of whom hereafter. Mr. 
Riddell's marriage was in 1731; he died in 1771; his widow died in 1792, 
aged 82 years. Her^pwwtmother was Annie, daughter of Sir Robert Lau- 
rie, Baronet of Maxwelton. Was this the "Annie Laurie" who was the 
subject of song? The same person. 

John Riddell' (1), second son of Walter 1 (1), of Glen-Riddell, mar- 
ried Helen, daughter of Sir Michael Balfour, Baronet of Denmilne, and 
became ancestor of the Riddells of Grange. For genealogy of his de- 
scendants, see article under that head. 

Walter Riddell 2 (2), a son of Walter 1 (1), of Glen-Riddell, was born 
at the family residence there (parish of Glencairne), between 1705 and 
1720, as proved by the parochial records. The Registrar-General of Scot- 
land, at Edinburgh, says, however, that "the margin of the leaf has been 
worn off, and it is impossible to decide whether Walter or William was the 
name of the child." My reasons for heading this paragraph " Walter" may 
be found in a note attending the genealogy of the Riddells of Glasslough, 
Ireland, which see. Walter evidently became ancestor of that branch, 
having left Scotland in consequence of a quarrel with his family. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Annie Riddell 8 (1), eldest daughter of Robert 2 (1), of Glen-Riddell, 
was married to Walter Riddell, Esq., of Newhouse, who was a son of 
Rev. Simon Riddell, who had married a Miss Riddell of Newhouse, the 
heiress (presumed) of that place, and a descendant of the Riddells of 
Riddell in the same parish. Rev. Simon Riddell's origin is not known, 
but he was probably descended from the Roxburghshire stock. Walter 
acquired Glen-Riddell, in right of his wife, and enjoyed it many years 

♦Glen-Riddell, formerly called Gilmerston, and latterly Snade, is near the river 
Cairne, in the parish of Glencairne, Dumfrieshire, Scotland. It was purchased by 
the society for the propagation of Christian knowledge in Edinburgh. It had pre- 
viously been purchased by the representative of a branch of the family of Riddell, 
of Riddell, in Roxburghshire, namely, Walter Riddell, Esq., who gave the place 
the name of Glen-Riddell: this seems to have been a custom with the Riddell fam- 
ily, namely, to give their name to their possessions, — a custom carried into Ireland 
and the United States. I do not know the date of the purchase of this place by 
Mr. Riddell. The ancient mansion has been dismantled, and the present house is 
only a ruin of the original residence; the walls are very thick, and part of the cot- 
tage is vaulted. Two families in humble circumstances now dwell there, and their 
cows occupy other parts of the building. The Riddells owned it in 1704. 



R ID DELLS OF GLEN-RIDDELL, SCOTLAND. 81 



before being followed by his son. By this marriage there were several 
children, of whom hereafter. 

Elizabeth Riddell 3 (1), second daughter of Robert 2 (1), of Glen-Rid- 
dell, was married to Mr. John Wood (Esq.), of Largo, governor of the Isle 
of Man from 1761 to 1775 A. D. 

Catherine Riddell 3 (1), third daughter of Robert- (1), of Glen-Rid- 
dell, was the wife of Maule, Esq. 

FOURTH GENERATION. . 

Robert Riddell 4 (2), eldest son of Walter 3 (3), and his wife, An- 
nie Riddell, of Glen-Riddell and Newhouse, succeeded to his mother's 
property ; married a Miss Kennedy, but had no issue. Mr. Riddell dis- 
tinguished himself as an antiquary and author. He published several 
small works; among them, "A Desertation on Ancient Modes of Fortify- 
cations in Scotland"; another on "The Petrified Fortifications of Scot- 
land." He was a member of the Philosophical Society of Manchester, 
and Fellow of the Antiquarian Societies of Edinburgh and London. 
He was a patron of Robert Burns, the poet, and is frequently mentioned 
by him in his poems; he was present at the celebrated convivial celebra- 
tion connected with the conquest of the "Whistle," as the following lines 
by the great bard imply : — 

"Three joyous good fellows, with hearts clear of flaw, 
Craigdorroch, so famous for wit, worth, and law, 
And trusty Glen-Riddell, so skilled in old coius, 
And gallant Sir Robert, deep read in old wines." * 

There are several other poems in which Mr. Riddell is alluded to during 
his lifetime, one of which was evidently sent to him with a returned news- 
paper, and is addressed to " Captain Riddell, of Glen-Riddell." It reads 

as follows : — 

" My goosequill too rude is to tell all your goodness, 
Bestowed on your servant, the poet. 
Would to God I had one like the beam of the sun, 
And then" all the world, sir, should know it." 

Mr. Riddell was in sympathy with those in the more lowly walks of 
life, and employed means to inform them by establishing a circulating 
library, which was owned by a society formed by his own tenants and 
farming neighbors. " Burns was treasurer, librarian, and censor." Mr. 
Riddell died April 21, 1794, and the representation of this family devolved 
upon the descendants of John, the second son of Walter, the first of Glen- 

* The parties mentioned in the poem entitled "The Whistle," were Robert Rid- 
dell, the antiquary; Furguson, of Craigdorroch, — "a line that struggled for free- 
dom under Bruce," — and Sir Robert Laurie, an admiral of the Royal Navy, all three 
gentlemen being connected in the ties of kinship. The lines of the poem were 
founded upon the challenge of a Dane, who brought the "whistle" to Scotland. 
The Scandinavian challenged various parties in his wine orgies, promising the whis- 
tle to the one who could outdrink him, and Sir Walter Laurie, the ancestor of the 
admiral, met and saw the Dane under the table, "blowing upon the whistle his 
requiem still." Having thus secured the trophy, Laurie and his brother-in-law, 
Walter Riddell, of Glen-Riddell, encountered one another in a bacchanalian contest, 
when the latter was victor, but his son-in-law, Robert Riddell, the "trusty Glen- 
Riddell " of the song, lost it to his friend Furguson, whose libations on the occa- 
sion were very wonderful, and whose representative now possesses the little ebony 
whistle which Walter Riddell-Carre, Esq., late of Cavers, had seen and blown upon, 
but not in a bacchanalian encounter. 



82 BIDDELLS OF CLEN-IiWDELL, SCOTLAND. 

Riddell, who are the nearest mule heirs if the male line of Glen-Riddell 
terminated with the first Robert in 1771, as Walter Riddell-Carre says. 
Mr. Riddell's death seems to have taken place at a residence of the Glen- 
Riddell family, called " Friars' Carse," in DunsCore parish, also in Dumfrie- 
shire, a property acquired by his grandfather, who died there in 1771.* 

Burns was a frequent visitor at the homes of the Riddell family at Glen- 
Riddel 1 and Friars' Carse, and seems to have been intimate with them from 
the time Robert Riddell succeeded. The following verses were composed 
for the anniversary of the wedding-day of Captain Riddell of Glen-Riddell, 
and set to the air of "A Musical Gentleman" : — 

" The day returns, my bosom burns, 

The blissful day we twa did meet ; 
Though winter wild in tempest toiled, 

Ne'er summer's sun was hall" sae sweet. 
Then a' the pride that loads the tide, 

And crosses o'er the sultry line, 
Than kingly robes, than crows and globes, 

Heaven gave me more, — it gave thee mine. 

While day and night can bring delight , 

Or nature aught of pleasure give, 
"While joys above my mind cau move, 

For thee, and thee alone, I live ! 
When that grim foe of life below 

Comes in between to make us part, 
The iron hand that breaks our band, 

It breaks my bliss, it breaks my heart." 

The poet Burns seems to have deeply lamented the death of his friend, 
and to have greatly missed his company and entertainment after his de- 
parture. He commemorates the virtues of his early friend and patron in 
the following lines : — 

"No more, ye warblers of the wood, — no more! 
Nor pour your descant, grating on my soul; 
Thou young-eyed Spring, gay in thy verdant store, 
More welcome were to me grim Winter's wildest roar. 

* Friars' Carse, in Nithsdale, Dumfrieshire, Scotland, was once a cell dependent 
upon the rich abbey of Melrose, which at the Reformation was granted by the 
Commendator to the Laird of Elliesland, a cadet of the Kirkpatricks of Closeburn. 
It passed to the Maxwells of Tinwald, and from them to the Borncleugh family, 
also cadets of the Lords of Maxwell. From these last owners it went into posses- 
sion of the Riddells of Glen-Riddell. The old refectory, or dining-room, had walls 
eight feet thick, and the chimney was twelve feet wide. This ancient building hav- 
ing become ruinous by lapse of time, was pulled down about a hundred years ago 
by Robert Riddell, to give place to the present house known as Friars' Carse, now 
owned by Thomas Nelson, Esq. Near the house is a loch, which was the fish-pond 
of the friary, in the middle of which is a very curious island, artificial in construc- 
tion, fouuded upon large piles and planks of oak, where the monks are supposed to 
have lodged their valuables when the English made an inroad into the Strathnith. 
(See plate in this work.) The estate was purchased latterly by the well-known Dr. 
Crichton, a very rich man and great benefactor to his country, and after the Crich- 
ton purchase, the poem entitled "The Whistle," was found there in the poet's own 
handwriting. The poet traced the lines "Riddell, much-lamented man," with a dia- 
mond on a window of Friars' Carse the first time he visited it after the death of 
his friend, the Laird of Carse ; the lines read thus : — 

"To Riddell, much-lamented man. 
This ivied cot was dear; 
Reader, dost value matchless worth ? 
This ivied cot revere." 



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HIDDELLS OF GLEN-RIDDELL, SCOTLAND. 83 

How can ye charm, ye flowers, with all your dyes ? 

Ye blaw upon the soil that wraps ray friend ; 

How can I to the tuneful strain attend? 
The stream Hows round the untimely tomb where Riddell lies. 

Yes, pour, ye warblers, pour the notes of woe ! 

And soothe the virtues weeping o'er the bier; 

The man of worth who has not left his peer, 
Is in his narrow house forever darkly low. 

The spring again with joy shall others greet, 

Me memory of my loss will only meet." 

Capt. Walter Riddell 4 (4), second son of Walter 3 (3), of Glen- 
Riddell and Newhouse, and his wife Annie Riddell, who was heiress of 
her father, Robert Riddell, the second Laird of Glen-Riddell, became 
possessed by purchase of " Woodley Park,"* near Dumfries. He married 
Maria Woodley,f a lady of poetical gifts and accomplishments, who wrote 

* The following extract was forwarded to me by the Rev. C. C. Culpeper, rector 
of Christ's Church, Nichola Town, St. Christopher Island, and should settle the 
question as to the maiden-name of the wife of Walter Riddell, of Woodley Park, 
Dumfrieshire : "1790. Walter Riddell, of the Island of Antigua, Gentleman, and 
Marin Woodley, of the Parish of Christ's Church, Nichola Town, Spinster, were 
married by licence, the 16th day of September, 1790, by me, Joseph Barnes." Wit- 
nessed as a correct extract from the register of Christ's Church, Nichola Town, 
by Horatio W. A. Douglas, schoolmaster. — Author. 

f Burns having been a frequent and welcome guest at the house of Mrs. Riddell, 
of Woodley Park, is said, on one occasion, when under the influence of wine he had 
taken at her table, and the alluring charms of his fair hostess' conversation and 
manner, to have so far forgot himself as to attempt to kiss her, — an indignity, 
however, which she punished by the withdrawal of her friendship. During the con- 
tinuance of this coldness, which lasted nearly two years, he weakly gave way to 
his wrath and wouuded pride in two or three lampoons and other satirical effu- 
sions, which were not to his credit; but ultimately a kindlier feeling possessed 
him, under the influence of which he composed a song and sent it to Mrs. Riddell 
as a kind of peace-offering. To her honor, be it said, she replied to his song in a 
similar strain of poetic license, which she did to soothe his ruffled feelings, and 
help to heal the breach that kept them separated ; and having the magnanimity to 
forgive his insult, they ultimately became thoroughly reconciled. He, at another 
time, took offence because she seemed to pay more attention to some officers in the 
company than to the poet, who had a supreme contempt for "epauletted puppies" 
as he delighted to call them; and while under the influence of this offence he sat- 
irized Mrs. Riddell in the following " stinging epitaph " : — 

"Here lies now a prey to insulting neglect, 

Where once was a Butterfly gay in life's bloom ; 
Want only of wisdom denied her respect, 
Want only of goodness denied her esteem." 

He also gave vent to his feelings in the following "Monody on Mrs. Riddell, 
Famed for Her Caprice " : — 

" How cold is that bosom which folly once fir'd! 

How pale is that cheek where the rouge lately glistened ! 
How silent that voice which the echoes oft tired. 
How dull is that ear that to flattery so listened ! 

If sorrow and anguish await, 

From friendship and dearest affection removed, 
How doubly severe, Maria, thy fate ! 

Thou diest unwept, and thou livedst unloved. 

Loves, graces, and virtues, I call not on you, 

So shy, grave, and distant, ye shed not a tear; 
But come, all ye offspring of Folly so true, 

And flowers let us cull for Maria's cold bier. 



84 RIDDELLS OF GRANGE, SCOTLAND. 

a biographical sketch of the poet Burns, which I have seen in an edition 
of his poems, in which she has warmly eulogized him. I do not know 
whether there were children in this familv.* 

Sophia Riddell 4 (1), youngest daughter of Walter 3 (3), of Glen- 
Riddell, died unmarried in 1797. 

Alexander Riddell 4 (1), presumed to be a son of Walter 3 (3), of 
Glen-Riddell, died at Hampton Court, in 1804; he was styled "Esquire, 
of Glen-Riddell." 



RIDDELLS OF GRANGE, SCOTLAND. 

Jollll Riddell 1 (1), second son of Walter 1 (1), the first Laird of Glen- 
Riddell, became possessed of a property called "Grange," in Fifeshire. 
He married Helen, daughter of Sir Michael Balfour, a baronet, and had 
issue, of whom more hereafter. It has been supposed that the represen- 
tation of Glen-Riddell and Newhouse rightfully devolved upon the male 
descendants of this John, and the relationship has been so stated in the pub- 
lished pedigrees of the family; but a claimant has been found in Ireland, 
who assumes, with many very well-founded evidences, to be descended 
from the Glen-Riddells through a nearer branch, springingj'rom a son who 
became alienated from his relatives in consequence of a religious or po- 
litical disagreement, and went to Ireland, where he was unknown to the 
younger generations of Glen-Riddell. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Walter Riddell' 2 (1), eldest son of John 1 (1), was styled "of Grange," 
in Fifeshire, and died sine prole in 1762. 

Michael Riddell' (1), second son of John 1 (1), was of Grange, in 
Fifeshire, and was married three times ; first to Miss Margaret, daughter 
of Henry Balfour (probably a kinswoman), by whom he had issue one son ; 
by Janet, daughter of Robert Hunter, his second wife, there were two 
sons. Mr. Riddell lived to old age ; the name of his third wife has not 
reached me. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Gen. Michael Riddell 3 (2), eldest son of Michael 2 (1), was of Grange, 
Fifeshire ; married Miss Sheridan, and had issue two sons, of whom here- 

We'll search through the gardens for each silly flower, 
We '11 roam through the forest for each idle weed ; 

But chiefly the nettle, so typical, shower, 
For none e'er approached her but rued the rash deed. 

We'll sculpture the marble, we'll measure the lay, 

Here Vanity strums on her idiot lyre; 
There keen Indignation shall dart on her prey, 

Which spurring Contempt shall redeem from his ire." 

* There was a Miss Deborah Davies, a beautiful young English lady, connected by 
ties of blood with the family of Captain Riddell of Glen-Riddell, at whose house 
the poet Burns met her, and her beauty and accomplishments made so deep an im- 
pression upon him that he celebrated them in prose and song. 



RID DELLS OF GB ANTON, SCOTLAND. 85 

after. He was a major general in the East India Company's service, 
commanding the southern division of the Madras army. He died at To- 
ronmungalalam, India, November, 1844. 

John Riddell 3 (2), second son of Michael' 2 (1), was in the army and 
died sine prole in 1822. 

Robert Riddell 3 (1), third son of Michael 2 (1), was in the East India 
Company's service, and afterwards in Canada, British North America. 
He married in 1836, Elizabeth, daughter of Rear Admiral Henry Vansi- 
tart, and had issue three sons and three daughters, of whom hereafter. 
The family returned to Britain, and both Mr. and Mrs. Riddell have since 
deceased. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Robert- Vansitart Riddell 4 (2), eldest son of Robert 8 (1), is now 
(1874) serving in the Bengal Engineers, in India, and has been recognized 
as the representative of the families of Glen-Riddell and Grange, although 
he does not own any properties there, these having passed to other fam- 
ilies. 

Henry- Vansitart Riddell 4 (1), second son of Robert 3 (1), is now a 
soldier in the Bengal Native Infantry, in India. 

Walter Riddell 4 (2), third son of Robert 3 (1), is now a soldier in the 
armv in India, with his brothers. 

Mary-Clara Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of Robert 3 (1). 

Elizabeth- Janette Riddell 4 (1), second daughter of Robert 3 (1). 

Caroline Riddell 4 (1), third daughter of Robert 3 (1). 



RIDDELLS OF GRANTON, SCOTLAND. 

Rev. Archibald Riddell 1 (1), the first of this denomination, was 
the third son of Walter, the second Baronet of Riddell, in Roxburghshire, 
and his wife, Jane Rigg. He was ordained as minister of Kippen about 
the year 1676, but preached often in field conventicles. He suffered 
persecution and imprisonment, and was obliged to leave Scotland and go 
to New Jersey, in the United States, where he spent three years as a 
preacher in Woodbridge. Although his name appears among those of 
other preachers who had drawn upon them the attention of the govern- 
ment by attending conventicles as early as 1674, yet the first serious 
proceedings against him seem to have been prompted by his connection 
in some way with the rising of Bothwell in 1679, the Privy Council 
ordering on the 24th of June that he should be sought for and offering 
a reward for his arrest. He was taken in September by the Laird of Gra- 
den, a relative of his wife, and sent to the Tolbooth at Jedburgh, whence 
he was removed to the prison at Edinburgh. On the first of October, 
and again in December, Mr. Riddell was called before the Council of Pub- 
lic Affairs, and so conducted himself as to secure the respect of his 
examiners. He was remitted to confinement, however, until released on 
the application of the Laird of Pitlochie, with the view of emigrating 
to New Jersey. During this period in April, 1681, he was allowed to visit 
his dying mother, at Riddell house, and in the following June he was 



J^e 



86 IIIDDELLS OF Gil ANTON, SCOTLAND. 

charged with having broken his confinement, keeping conventicles, and 
baptizing children, and, in consequence, the place of his imprisonment 
was changed, he being sent to the Bass. lie and the Rev. Thomas Pat- 
terson are described by the proprietaries as " two persons who have been 
in prison in Scotland for nonconformity, and are greatly esteemed among 
the people who are of their persuasion in matters of religion"; and as 
they are willing to transport themselves to East Jersey, and settle there, 
which will be the occasion of inviting a great number to follow them, 
the necessary directions were given to have two hundred acres of land 
allotted to each immediately on their arrival, in such places as might 
best accommodate them, provided they build them houses and continue 
their own or some other family there three years. 

On board the ill-fated " Henry and Francis " we are not able to follow 
them. Mrs. Riddell and his children accompanied him, and she died on 
shipboard; the children were spared to him, to contribute to his happiness 
in his new home at Woodbridge, where his two hundred acres were allot- 
ted him, and where he purchased other lands. He officiated at Trinity 
Church at Woodbridge from 1686 to 1689, when he, having fulfilled the 
conditions of settlement, left the country, and started on his return to 
his native land, — a land having more charms for him than the " New 
World." He set sail with a son ten years of age, in June, 1689, but he 
was doomed to other sufferings and disappointments. Favorable weather 
attended him, but on the 2d of August, when off the coast of England, 
the vessel was captured by a French man-of-war, and the passengers sent 
to the common jail atRochefort, whence they were subsequently marched 
to Toulon, chained two and two by their arms, and, at first, each ten pairs 
tied to a rope, but this being found an impediment to their traveling, 
was abandoned the second day. Mr. Riddell was chained to his little 
son, who was so small that he gave them no little trouble, three different 
bands being forged by the smith before one could be found small enough 
to confine his slender wrists. They were six weeks on the way to Toulon, 
the hardships of the journey causing the death of many, and on their 
arrival were conveyed to the hold of an old hulk in the harbor, but 
after the detention of a month, Mr. Riddell and his son and others were 
taken back again to Rochefort, and thence to Demain, near St. Malo, 
where for more than a year they were kept prisoners in the vault of an 
old castle. At last, after having been confined nearly two years, they 
were exchanged for two Romish priests and allowed to return to Scot- 
land.* While they were imprisoned in the old castle they lay on straw, 
never changed save once a month, suffering every indignity and misery. 
But his trials were ended with his release, and he passed the rest of his 

* The following royal letter was found by one of the Riddells some time ago in the 
State Paper Office, London, which was issued directly from the sovereign, William 
III, and directed to the Privy Council of Scotland, being to the following effect : — 

"William Rex, Right Trusty and Entirely Beloved. Whereas we are in- 
formed that Mr. Archibald Riddell, Minister of the Gospel, and .James Sinclair 
of Freshwick, are prisoners in France, and are very hardly used, whom we are re- 
solved to have released by exchange with two Priests now Prisoners in Scotland. 
Therefore, WE require you to call for their friends and nearest relations of the said 
Mr. Archibald Riddell and James Sinclair, and signify our Royal Pleasure to them 
in exchange of these two Prisoners with the two Priests thai shall he condescended 
upon, and authorise them not only to speak with the two Priests, but also to write 
to France anent the negotiating their friends' liberty, ami that you cause these two 
Priests to be condescended upon and securely keeped, and make intimation to them 



BIDDELLS OF G BAN TON, SCOTLAND. 87 

days in peace and security ; indeed, as Woodrow states, when he returned 
all his losses were made up, and he and his children (his wife, who was a 
daughter of Henry Atkenhead, minister of North Berwick, having died 
on the voyage to America) were in better circumstances than if he had 
conformed, to which he had been instigated. He was appointed minister 
of Trinity College Church, a fine structure built by Mary of Guelders, 
in which charge he died in 1708, and his remains were deposited in 
Greyfriars churchyard, where the bodies of many eminent servants of 
God are buried, and where his brother, Sir John Riddell, the Baronet of 
Riddell, had been previously interred. Mr. Riddell left a great reputation 
behind him, and Dr. Hew Scott says : " He was a singularly pious and 
laborious servant of Jesus Christ." English genealogists have stated that 
there were two sons and two daughters in this family, but there are 
divers evidences pointing to a son William settled in New Jersey, who 
became the ancestor of the numerous Riddells and Riddles in Virginia 
and about Cincinnati, Ohio, descended from William and John, sons of 
the William before mentioned. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Com. Walter Riddell 2 (1), eldest son of Archibald 1 (1), of Granton, 
married Sarah, sister of Sir John Nisbet, of Dean, but died without issue 
in 1738; his widow married Sir John Rutherford, of Rutherford. He 
was a captain in the Royal Navy, and greatly distinguished himself in the 
war of the Spanish succession under Queen Anne. He became commo- 
dore and was knighted. His conduct and bravery as a naval officer is 
noticed in a history of Europe, 1709, and he is also proved to have dis- 
tinguished himself in the capture of vessels and in opposing the rebels in 
1715, stimulated, no doubt, by the treatment shown his father in the reign 
of James II, as before shown. In the archives of the admiralty a list 
exists of about thirty-seven vessels, taken by him from the French while 
commanding the "Phoebe," frigate of war. Being attacked by a superior 
force on one occasion, his vessel was taken by the enemy, and he succeeded 
in getting off in a boat with part of the crew, unobserved. Having kept 
in sight of the French fleet, he observed that for some reason the "Phoebe" 
had fallen behind and become separated from the other ships, upon which 
he rowed back to Ins vessel, recaptured her, and made his escape. In con- 
sequence of this feat he was authorized to change his family escutcheon, 
and to substitute a boat with oars in place of one of the ears of rye, and 
to adopt the motto, "Row and Retake" ; this is therefore the escutcheon 
of the Granton branch of Riddell. He acquired the barony of West 
Granton, near Edinburgh. Supposed to be the son that was chained to 
his father in France, before mentioned. He was succeeded by his brother 
in 1738* 

that they shall be used in the same way and manner as the French King uses the 
said Scots Prisoners, which they may be ordered to acquaint their friends in France 
with, that exchange may be more easily effected. For doing of which these Pres- 
ents shall be your warrant, and so we bid you hertily farewell. 

" Given at the Court of Kensington this 16th day of January, 1689, and of our 
Reign the first year. — By His Majesty's Command. (Signed) Melville." 

* Walter Riddell was appointed captain of the "Mermaid" 21 Dec, 1703; 
promoted to second lieutenant of the '• Chichester," of seventy guns, in 1705. The 
first part of his service as naval commander is barren of incident. In 1706, he 
commanded the " Isabella," a yacht, ordered with Sir Cloudesley Shovel, and the 
fieet under his command to the Mediterranean (it being, at that day, always cus- 



88 H1DDELLS OF GBANTON, SCOTLAND. 

John Riddell" (1), second son of Archibald 1 (1), was a physician in 
Edinburgh; married Jane Livingstone, an heiress, and had issue many 
children who died young. Dr. Riddell died in 1740, leaving a widow and 
two children, of whom hereafter. He was eminent in his profession. 

Janet Riddell" (1), eldest daughter of Archibald 1 (1), was born in 
Scotland, and went to New Jersey, United States, with her father's fam- 
ily at the time of his banishment. She was married Jan. 26, 1686, to 
James, son of Sir James Dundas, who was Lord Orinston, great-grand- 
father of General, the Rt. Hon. Sir D. Dundas, G. C. B7, of Beechwood, 
late commander-in-chief. Her husband was one of the party that came 
on the "Henry and Francis" from Scotland. These resided at Perth 
Amboy, his household being located on Smith Street. Mr. Dundas was 
selected by William Dockwra, in 1688, for one of his deputy receiver- 
generals, but would not accept the office ; however, on being appointed 
by the Proprietaries, in January, 1694, receiver-general, he consented to 
serve, and held the office till his death in 1698. Mrs. Dundas survived 
her husband and administered on his estate, after which she returned to 
Scotland and spent her last days with her kindred. 

Sarah Riddell 2 (1), second daughter of Archibald 1 (1), was born in 
Scotland, and presumably went to New Jersey in America, with her 

tomary to send a vessel or two of that description with all great naval armaments, 
which, independent of the purposes of state and pageantry, probably first gave rise 
to this equipment). He returned with his gallant admiral in October, 1707. His 
diligence and indefatigable attention to duty, procured his promotion soon after his 
return to England, to the "Falmouth," of fifty guns. In the year 1708, he was 
ordered for New England; and, when on Ins voyage homeward, in 1709, with 
a number of ships under his convoy, signalized himself in so distinguished a 
manner on being attacked by a French ship-of-war of superior force, that we 
scarcely know whether most to applaud his intrepidity and good conduct itself, 
or to rejoice at the unalloyed success which attended it. He continued cap- 
tain of the "Falmouth" for a considerable time after this, as in the year 1710, we 
find him in the same ship, accompanying Capt. George Martin, who then com- 
manded the "Dragon," on his successful expedition against the French settle- 
ment of Port Royal, in Acadia, now called Nova Scotia. In the year 1712. he still 
commanded the same ship, and was then stationed oft' the coast of Guinea, where, 
in company with Capt. Mabbott, of the "Mary Galley," he had a very spirited 
engagement with two French ships-of-war ; the enemy were, however, so fortunate 
as to make their escape. This is the last mention we find of Capt. Riddell. The 
time of his death is not known. 

" Admiralty Office, May 24, 1709. — Her Majesties ship 'Falmouth,' of fifty guns, 
commanded by Capt. Walter Ryddell, in her passage from New England with some 
ships laden with masts, and others under her convoy, was on the 18th of this mouth, 
attacked by a French ship-of-war of fifty guns, about twenty-four leagues from 
Scilly; and Capt. Ryddell, perceiving that the enemy did intend to board him, 
befilled his head-sails, and laid her on board under her boltsprit directly athwart 
her hawse, and raked lie r fore and aft with his cannon. The enemy continued in 
this posture about an hour an a half, during which time he entered many men, but 
they were repulsed; however, the number of men on board being much greater 
than those in the ' Falmouth, ' it occasioned various turns; but at length he thought 
fit to retire, first cut all t he lanyards of the ' Falmouth ' fore and mizen shrouds, be- 
lieving it might prevent her following to rescue the convoy, which the enemy stood 
after, notwithstanding which Captain Ryddell did with such diligence follow him as 
enabled him to preserve them and to bring them into Plymouth. In this act inn the 
'Falmouth ' had thirteen men killed and fifty-six wounded ; the captain himself re- 
ceived a wound in his right leg and several other hurts; and the second lieutenant 
and Mr. Lawrence, one of the volunteers, were shot through the body. The 'Fal- 
mouth' had on board her 20.000 pounds of New England money at the time of the 
engagement. Captain Ryddell's conduct on this occasion appears to have been 
rarely equalled and never excelled.." — Naval Biography. 



RIDDELLS OF GR ANTON, SCOTLAND. 89 

father; she was married to John Carrie, minister of Haddington. No 

other information. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

John Riddell 3 (2), eldest son of John 2 (1), of Granton, was a Writer 
to the Signet, Edinburgh ; married Christian, daughter of Sir John Nis- 
bet, Baronet of Dean, and had issue two sons, of whom hereafter. He 
was born in 1713, and died in 1745, and was succeeded by his son. 

Esther Riddell 3 (1), a daughter of John 2 (1), and Jane Livingstone, 
was married to Rev. Robert Riddell, her cousin, of Lilliesleaf, but had no 

issue. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

John Riddell 4 (3), eldest son of John 3 (2), was born in 1740 ; mar- 
ried Betsey, daughter of John Campbell, Esq., of Clathic and Killermont, 
and was for some time lord provost of C41asgow. The Granton estate had 
become much burdened with debt by the former proprietors, and was sold 
during this gentleman's minority ; it was purchased by the ancestors of 
the present Duke of Buccleuch. Mr. Riddell had issue Jive children, of 
whom hereafter. 

Henry Riddell 4 (1), second son of John 3 (2), was styled "of Little 
Govan." He married his cousin Anne, daughter of John Glassford, of 
Dougalston, by his second wife, Anne, daughter of Sir John Nisbet, of 
Dean. He was a merchant in Glasgow; had issue seven children, and 

died in 1801. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

John Riddell 5 (4), eldest son of John 4 (3), who was designated 
"younger of Granton," was a lieutenant in the Madras army, and died 
sine prole in 1828. 

Archibald Riddell 5 (2), second son of John 4 (3), younger of Granton. 
retired early from the army ; married an Austrian lady of rank, and lived 
at Vienna, Austria, till his death in 1877; he had issue two daughters; 
one survives. 

Elizabeth Riddell 5 (1), eldest daughter of John 4 (3), younger of Gran- 
ton, was married to William Home, Esq., of Stirkoke, Caithness, and 
sheriff of Haddingtonshire; no issue. 

Agnes Riddell 5 (1), second daughter of John 4 (3), younger of Gran- 
ton, was never married; died in 1874. 

Mary-Aline Riddell 5 (1), third daughter of John 4 (3), younger of 
Granton, was not married; died 1876. 

John Riddell 5 (5), eldest son of Henry 4 (1) of Little Govan, was born 
Oct. 4, 1785. He was styled "of Gulane Lodge," in East Lothian, and 
was considered the greatest antiquary and peerage-lawyer of his day. He 
published works on Scotch Peerage and Consistorial Law. Lord Lindsey, 
now Earl Crawford, a very high authority, wrote a most interesting ac- 
count of his splendid career and great attainments, from which I extract 
the following: "The genealogical knowledge, which gave weight and value 
to his opinions, was vast and profound, — the gathered stores of a life- 
time spent among public and private records ; almost every principal 
charter-chest in Scotland having at one time or other passed under his re- 
view. But this vast knowledge would have been little serviceable toward 
the great purposes to which he devoted it, had he not possessed that thor- 
ough familiarity with law, — feudal, consistorial, genealogical, and heraldic, 



90 BIDDELLS OF GBANTON, SCOTLAND. 

— and not of Scotland and England only, but of foreign nations, — which 
determined the value and regulated the application of the facts ever 
present before his mental eye. It was from this lofty eminence of prin- 
ciple and precedent that he was enabled to survey the length and breadth 
of Scottish genealogical antiquity; assign its limits to undue family pre- 
tensions; recall forgotten rights of representation to public recognition, 
and point out in many instances through which unsuspected or neglected 
hereditary honors might be legally claimed and vindicated. And it was 
from the full concurrent perception of the extent of the difficulty always 
attending on such processes, more especially before the House of Lords, 
that, acting under the impulse of that honesty which is always allied with 
the love of truth, as well as in accordance with his chivalric sense of honor, 
and his extreme disinterestedness on the point of professional remunera- 
tion, he carefully and distinctly, before engaging in such undertakings, 
pointed out the adverse considerations likely to attend upon them, which 
through deficiency of evidence, or irregular and fluctuating procedure 
in the tribunal where the claim must necessarily be prosecuted — anxious 
ever that his client should not commit himself to the pursuit without full 
warning of what it might entail upon him. But when once engaged in 
it he gave his whole soul to the object before him ; and it was beautiful 
and inspiring to witness the play of his thoughts during the evolution of 
his argument; the historical breadth of his views, and their ready conver- 
gence to the required focus, however minute the particular; his subtlety 
of legal discrimination; his fertility in illustration; his extraordinary 
readiness of resource; his untiring patience and industry in working out 
his results, contrasting with the eager impetuosity of utterance which ac- 
companied their birth; and lastly, the genuine professional courage spring- 
ing again, as before, from his manly honesty and love of truth, with which 
he never evaded, but boldly faced and combated every difficulty. I speak 
to all this from my own experience during the prosecution of the minute 
and complicated Peerage claims. 

"I have seldom witnessed more touching examples of that beautiful 
humility which is generally the sister of mental strength and moral dignity, 
than in Mr. Riddell. His pride was far more in the fame of his great 
predecessors in the same studies, and in that of the historical families of 
Scotland,* more especially those with whom he had become professionally 
related, than in his own reputation. He was as unselfish in that respect 
as he was disinterested in regard to the remuneration of his labours. 

" Everything he wrote was stamped with the power bestowed by pro- 
found legal knowledge and a boundless command of facts, and his works 
will continually be resorted to as a store-house of information on matters 
of genealogy and Peerage law by future generations." 

Such are Earl Crawford's views of his great professional acquirements 
and character. Mr. Riddell died issueless. The epitaph on his tomb in 
the Dean cemetery is as follows: — 

JOHAXXES RlDDEIX, Ks\>. 

Amk.i.k. Jurisconsultus, vir cojuscunque JEtatis Numbutus 
Uteris; Qui in Antiquitate 
Et ea Prcecipue Quce Ad Originis Gentilitias Pertinet 

* The Gkaxtox RrDDEIXS arc connected by marriaire with the Glassfords, Gil- 
christs, Iloincs, Dares, Pringles, Stephens, Fosters, Trevalyans, Smiths. Palmers, 
Laws. Constables, Campbells, Seaton-Karrs, ami other old and distinguished Scot- 
tish families. 



BIDDELLS OF GRANTON, SCOTLAND. 91 

Ad Veritatem fierum Revocandam Prodigus Laboris 

Atque Etiam Felix Fuit, Eandemque Scriptis 

Illustravit Auctor Omnium Conscensu Gravis- 

simus ; Hoc In Agro, Qui Proavorum fysius 

Olim Fuit, Sepultus Est. 

Natus IV° Die Octobris MDCCLXXXV. Decessit VIII° Die Feb- 

ruarii MDOCLXII. Vixit Annos LXXVI. 

"John Riddell, Esquire, advocate; a man imbued with the literature of 
every age, who in antiquities, and especially that branch of them which 
relates to the origin of families, by recalling it to the truth of fact, was 
prodigal of labor, and, moreover, felicitous. This pursuit he illustrated 
by his writings, being an author of the greatest weight, as all admit. 
In this land, once the property of his ancestors, he was buried. Born, 
4th October, 1785 ; died 8th February, 1862. He lived 76 years."* 

Rev. Henry Riddell 5 (2), second son of Henry 4 (1) of Little Go van, 
now a part of the city of Glasgow, was born May 23, 1789, at Glasgow ; 
married in 1818 Agnes Gilchrist, daughter of Archibald Gilchrist, Esq., 
by whom he had one son. His wife died at Bexhill, England, and he mar- 
ried secondly, in 1831, Elizabeth, daughter of John Home, Esq., of 
Storkoke, Caithnesshire, and by her had issue four children, of whom 
(with the first son) hereafter. Mr. Riddell was educated at the grammar 
school, Glasgow, till the age of 13, and afterwards at Edinburgh, where 
the family removed after the death of his father in 1801. He attended 
the University of Edinburgh, and passed as a " Writer to His Majesty's 
Signet." For a short time he practised his profession at Edinburgh, but 
removed to London about 1822, and became solicitor there. His wife's 
health was delicate, and she could not live in London, so he gave up busi- 
ness and went to the south of England, where Mrs. Riddell died. He 
then returned to Scotland, determined to enter the church, and passed 
through the Divinity terms at St. Mary's College, St. Andrews. His first 
settlement was at Longformacus, a small parish in Berwickshire, in 1830. 
In 1843 he was appointed assistant and successor to Rev. George Cun- 
ningham, minister of Dunse, and in 1847 succeeded him in that charge, 
where he remained till his death, which occurred April 15, 1862. His 
widow still survives and lives in Edinburgh. 

Rev. James Riddell 5 (1), third son of Henry 4 (1), of Little Govan, 
was probably born in Glasgow, Scotland, April 18,1794; married Dor- 
othy, daughter (and co-heiress) of John Foster, of Leicester Grange, and 
had issue several children, of whom hereafter. He was of Balliol College, 
Oxford, and was vicar of Hanbury, Staffordshire. He was for many years 
latterly at Leamington. He died in May, 1878, deeply lamented. See 
portrait. 

Robert Riddell 5 (1), fourth son of Henry 4 (1), of Little Govan, was 
born May 29, 1797, presumably at Glasgow; married in 1834 to Susan, 

* In the Advocates' Library, Edinburgh, Scotland, may be found the " Kiddell Note 
Books," about one hundred and fifty in number. In No. 43 is " Notes Relative to 
the Family of Carmichael," including several from the Morton Charter-chest, with 
pen-and-ink sketches of seals of the Rydale and Riddell family. The " Prefatory 
Observations" to the "Catalogue of the Riddell Papers" gives a short notice of 
the Papers and Note Books; a list of the published works of the late John Riddell, 
Esq., advocate; a letter introducing Mr. Riddell to Cardinal Gonsalvi, from the 
Rt. Hon. George Canning ; a sketch, by Lord Liudsey, of the career and character of 
the great genealogical scholar, with some remarks on it by the editor of the Edin- 
burgh Courant; his epitaph and mementos of Faculty of Advocate and a portrait. 



92 RIDDELL8 OF GBAXTOX, SCOTLAM). 

daughter of James Law, Es<j., of Elvington, in the county of Haddington, 
and by her had issue Jive children, of whom hereafter. lie was educated 
at Edinburgh for the profession of advocate, which he became in 1820. 
He was appointed in L829 i<> the office of sheriff substitute of the county 
of Haddington, which he retained till his death, April 18, 1862. He 
possessed considerable professional acquirements, and made a most efficient 
magistrate, and combined with these qualifications no ordinary degree of 
literary attainments, especially in that department of law and research in 
which his brother John was so famous. His brother once said of him, 
"he was tarred with the same brush." 

Christiana Riddell 5 (1), eldest daughter of Henry 4 (1), of Little 
Govan, was born in 1784; was married to Archibald Douglas, of Glinfin- 
nart, and was mother of that Col. John Douglas, C. B., who served in the 
whole Crimean war, where he led the Eleventh Hussars and miraculously 
escaped a desperate charge at Balaklava. She died in 1817. 

Jane Riddell 5 (1), second daughter of Henry 4 (1), of Little Govan, 
was born Sept. 26, 1790, and resides in Edinburgh. 

Catharine Riddell 5 (1), third daughter of Henry 4 (1), of Little Govan, 
was born in 1792 and died in 1869. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

Eliza Riddell'' (1), only surviving daughter of Archibald- 5 (2), is now 
living with her mother in Austria. 



Henry Riddell 6 (3), eldest son of Henry 5 (2), was born Aug. 4, 1819, 
and was educated for the profession of barrister-at-law, but was very del- 
icate, and died at Wiseton, Northamptonshire, in 1850, aged 31 years, pre- 
sumably unmarried. 

John Riddell 6 (6), second son of Henry 5 (2), and eldest by second 
wife, was born Feb. 18, 1836; now of Dean, near Geelong, Victoria; has 
married, but his wife's name has not reached me. Xo issue. 

William Riddell 6 (1), third son of Henry 5 (2), was born May 8, 1838; 
married in 1877, Lizzie, third daughter of the late Robert Pringle, Esq., 
of Carriber, Linlithgowshire. He was of Singhia, Tirhoot, East Indies, 
where he has been successful as a planter. He has taken a country house 
called Oxendean, near Dunse, in Berwickshire, Scotland, where his late 
father was minister. He does not believe the tradition of the New Jersey 
Riddells, that their ancestor was descended from the Granton family, but 
thinks he may have been a collateral kinsman. 

James Ri'ddell 6 (2), fourth son of Henry"' (2), was born Dec. 28, 1840; 
married in 1869, Harriet-Anne, daughter of William Stevens, Esq., of 
Montreal, Canada, and has issue four children, of whom hereafter. He is 
of Badulipar, Assam, East Indies, where he has made money as a planter. 

Elizabeth Riddell 6 (2), only daughter of Henry 6 (2), was born in 
1834 (presumably at Dunse), and resides in Edinburgh with her widowed 
mother; unmarried. 

Rev. James Riddell 6 (3), eldest son of James 5 (1), was born June 8, 
1823, and was educated at Shrewsbury school, where he was one of the 
favorite pupils of Dr. Kennedy, and whence he was elected to a scholar- 
ship at Balliol College, in November, 1841, the colleague in the election 
being Dr. Matthew Arnold. He had obtained the highest honor at 
Shrewsbury, which was the Sydney gold medal. He was only eighteen 
when he went, at the head of thirty candidates from the best schools in 



RID DELLS OF Git AN TON, SCOTLAND. 93 

England, to a scholarship at Oxford. As an under-graduate he was be- 
loved both by his seniors and contemporaries for gentleness of manner 
and great amiability of disposition, and the heads of the college consid- 
ered him one of the best and most promising scholars that Balliol ever 
reared. Having obtained a first class in classics, he took his degree and 
was made fellow of his college, taking holy orders. Shortly after, he 
was appointed one of the teachers, and in this sphere he was much re- 
spected by his pupils ; he was also made a public examiner, and in addi- 
tion held other honorable appointments connected with the university, 
including a seat at the Hebdomadal Council, the governing body. He 
was also for one year a select preacher at St. Mary's, and in 1864 was ap- 
pointed one of the Whitehall preachers, both positions being alike hon- 
orable ; he was nominated to the latter by the Bishop of London. He 
left Oxford at the beginning of a vacation in his usual health, — never 
very robust, — and went to Sherburn, Dorcestershire, joined his family at 
a temporary residence at Tunbridge Wells, whei*e his health, perhaps un- 
favorably acted upon by intense application to study for so many years, 
gave way, and alarming symptoms suddenly appeared, which ended in his 
death on the 14th of September, 1866; his remains were interred at 
Tunbridge Wells. His loss was greatly felt, not only among old Shrews- 
bury and Balliol men, but throughout the university and at Leamington, 
where he and his family had long resided. He enjoyed the reputation of 
being one of the best, — some say the best, —Greek scholars of his day, 
but it is a melancholy pleasure to his old friends to recall the fact of his 
siugular goodness, innocence, and purity ; and his former pupils will ever 
bear testimony to the loving industry and patience he brought to bear on 
his college labors for nearly twenty years. His published translations of 
Greek and Latin verses showed the high rank he took in such composi- 
tions, and it is not a little singular that the last production of his pen 
was a Latin translation of Watts' well-known hymn : — 

" There is a land of pure delight, 

Where saints immortal reign; 
Infinite day excludes the night, 

And pleasures banish pain; 
There everlasting spring abides, 

And never-withering flowers ; 
Death,*like a narrow sea, divides 

That heavenly land from ours." 

The Rev. Canon Liddon says, "The salient features of his character, 
— his courage, his purity, his tenderness, his delicate and far-reaching con- 
scientiousness, — were sufficiently obvious to all who knew him; but to 
show the relation of these virtues to his great intellectual life, and to 
mark the finer shades which would have to be distinguished, is, I fear, be- 
yond anything that I could at present, if ever, attempt." See the por- 
trait in this book. 

John Riddell 6 (7), second son of James 5 (1), was married in 1860 to 
Jane Peppercorn, daughter of William Peppercorn, Esq., and is supposed 
to have a family of children, but I have no records. 

Charlotte-Dorothy Riddell 6 (1), eldest daughter of James 5 (1), I have 
no particulars of; her name stands in the printed pedigree. 

Aline Riddell 6 (l), second daughter of James 5 (1), was married in 1862 
to the Rev. Edward-Trevelyan Smith, m. a., late scholar of St. John's Col- 
lege, Cambridge, and now (1862) incumbent of St. Paul's Church, Warwick. 



94 EIDDELLS OF BEESBOROUGH, SCOTLAND. 

Henrietta Riddell" (1), third daughter of .lames 5 (1), I have no par- 
ticulars of; her name stands in the family pedigree. 



Henry-James Riddell" (4), eldest son of Robert 5 (1), was born July 
8, 183S, and died in 1S47, aged nine years. 

Robert Riddell" (2), second son of Robert 6 (1), was born March 23, 
1840; was educated at Edinburgh, Scotland, and is now (1878) a civil 
engineer at Lanowlee, Bombay, India. 

William-Law Riddell 6 (2), third son of Robert 5 (1), was born Oct. 
16, 1843; married in 1877 Mary-Ann Fra/.er, and is now (1878) of River- 
side, Otago, New Zealand. One daughter. 

Jane- Anne Riddell 6 (2), eldest daughter of Robert 5 (1), was born 
Oct. 4, 1835; was married in 1860 to .lames Constable, Esq., of Cally, 
Perthshire, and has four sons and six daughters. 

Susan-Mary Riddell 1 '' (1), youngest daughter of Robert 5 ( 1 ), was born 
Sept. '23, 1841, and resides in Edinburgh, Scotland. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Henrv-James Riddell 7 (5), eldest sou of James 6 (2), was born Oct. 
21, 1870* In India. 

William-John Riddell' (3), second son of James 6 (2). was born May 
19, 1872. In India. 

Walter Riddell 7 (2), third son of James'' (2), was born (probably in 
India) Oct. 29, 1874. A daughter was born Feb. 20, 1879. 



Mary-Hepburn Riddell 7 (2), a daughter of William 6 (2), was born 
(probably in New Zealand) in December, 1877. 



RIDDELLS OF BEESBOROUGH, SCOTLAND. 

Cant, Thomas Riddell 1 (1), was the fifth son of Walter- (10), the 
fifth Baronet of Riddell (whose pedigree see.). He married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Laughlan MacLauchlan, Esq., of an ancient Highland family, 
and had issue several children, of whom hereafter. He was an officer in 
the East India Company's naval service, and made successful voyages to 
India and China. A journal of one of his voyages to East India is in 
the British Museum, a copy of which the author of this work secured and 
has deposited in the archives of the New England Historical Society, in 
Boston, Mass. Captain Riddell made money by his adventures, and return- 
ing to Scotland, purchased a property in Berwickshire called "Karnes," 
which he named " Beesborough," after the ship he commanded, and made 
it his residence. There is a fine oil-painting of Mrs. Riddell and one of her 
children, made when she was a young and very beautiful woman, and a 
photographic copy is now in the author's possession. Captain Riddell 
died in 1805, and was succeeded by his son. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Capt. Thomas Riddell" (2), eldest son of Thomas 1 (1), was styled 
"the second of Beesborough." lie was an officer in the Fourteenth Regi- 



RIDDELLS OF CAMIESTON, SCOTLAND. 95 

ment of Foot, and died at Trinidad in September, 1802, "a man of 
ability and soldierly deportment, universally respected." 

Gen. Henry -James Riddell" (1), second son of Thomas 1 (1) and his 
wife, Elizabeth MacLauchlan, was of Beesborough. He entered the navy 
at an early age, but left this service for the army, and obtained his first 
commission in 1798. His service extended through many years, and was 
of a very important character. He served at the siege and capture of 
Copenhagen, under Lord Cathcart, in 1807, and afterwards went to the 
Peninsula, and was prominent at the crossing of the Bidassoa, with Lord 
Lyndoch's Division, in 1813. He afterwards joined the army on the 
eastern coast of Spain, and was present at several affairs — at Villa-Franca, 
and before Barcelona during the blockade of that fortress, and finally 
embarked for Genoa with the Italian Brigade under Count Latorer, and 
was senior officer of the Quartermaster-general's department at the surren- 
der of the Genoese territory, in 1814. During the Peace, General Riddell 
was employed in England, Scotland, and Ireland, and was never on half- 
pay. In 1847 he was appointed to the command of the forces in Scot- 
land, and the governorship of Edinburgh Castle, which position he held 
till 1852. His commissions bear date as follows: ensign, March, 1798; 
lieutenant, April 19, 1798; captain, Dec. 28, 1809; major, Dec. 10, 1810; 
lieutenant-colonel, June 4, 1813; colonel, July 22, 1830; major-general, 
Nov. 23, 1841; lieutenant-general, Nov. 11, 1851; general, Sept. 26, 1857, 
and colonel Sixteenth Foot, June 25, 1851. He died March 8, 1861, at 
Oxendean, aged 79 years. He was never married. There was a very 
good oil-portrait of the general, painted when he was a young soldier, a 
copy of which is in the author's possession. He is represented in uniform 
with sword, and must have been a splendid-looking man.* 

Olive Riddell' 2 (1), a daughter of Thomas 1 (1), was a maiden-lady, 
(as also four other daughters, whose names have not reached me), who 
died March 22, 1862. 



RIDDELLS OF CAMIESTON, SCOTLAND. 

Thomas Riddell 1 (1) was third son of Walter 19 (9), the fourth Baro- 
net of Riddell, and Mary, daughter of John Watt, of Rosehill. He was 
born in 1690 A. D. ; married April 23, 1740, Margaret, daughter of Rev. 
William Hunter, f minister of Lilliesleaf and Laird of Union Hall, which 

* Gen. Hemy-James Riddell became involved in his financial relations, having 
been security for his kinsman, Sir John B. Riddell, Bart., of Riddell, and was 
obliged to sell "Beesborough" to make good his responsibilities, and to raise 
means to provide for his several maiden-sisters ; some of these lived to be quite aged. 

fThe Hunters were well descended, and the minister a singularly pious and good 
man. This family is intimately connected with the Rid dells. Union Hall was ac- 
quired by Dr. Hunter, the minister's son, who conveyed it to his son, Col. Edgar 
Hunter, a very popular country gentleman, who was killed by a fall from his 
horse iu the prime of life ; unmarried. At his death the succession fell to his 
first cousin, William Riddell, of Camieston, — well known to some still living, — 
whose father married Colonel Hunter's sister. The eldest daughter of the Rev. 
William Hunter married the Rev. Adam Milne, minister and historian of Melrose ; 
and his only child having died young, the Linthill property passed to Mr. Riddell 



96 IUDDELLS OF CAM J K STOW SCOTLAND. 



is a part of the present Linthill property, Mid lam Mill estate. Camie- 
ston was acquired by the fourth baronet for this son Thomas, and bestowed 
upon him when a young man. He died in 1750, and left issue four sons 
and three daughters, of whom hereafter. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Walter Riddell 2 (1), eldest son of Thomas 1 (1), was born at Camie- 
ston, Roxburghshire, Scotland, in 1742, and died young. 

William Riddell 2 (1), second son of Thomas 1 (1), succeeded his father 
at Camieston. He was born in 1746; married Jan. 13, 1776, to Elizabeth 
Carre, daughter and heiress of John Carre, of Cavers, in Roxburghshire, 
and had issue three sons and three daughters, of whom hereafter. Mr. Rid- 
dell was educated in Edinburgh, and passed as Writer to the Signet, and 
King's Writer for Scotland. He died Nov. 23, 1829. He acquired the 
estate of Union Hall, otherwise Linthill, from the Hunters, but sold it in 
1822 to a Mr. Currie. 

Thomas Riddell" (2), third son of Thomas 1 (1), was born in 1748, and 
died in 1756. 

Robert Riddell" (1), fourth son of Thomas 1 (1), was born in 1750. 
He was in the East India Company's naval service, and perished on board 
the " Duchess of Athole," when that vessel was accidentally burned in 
Madras Roads in 1793. This occurred during the absence of the captain, 
and feeling his responsibility to be greater, — being in temporary com- 
mand, — and being so devoted to duty (perhaps over-devotion) that he 
could not be induced to abandon the vessel, and was the only person who 
perished in the flames, — falling a noble sacrifice to duty. 

Margaret Riddell 2 (1), eldest daughter of Thomas 1 (1), was born in 

1744, and died in 1771, unmarried. 

Elilior Riddell 2 (1), second daughter of Thomas 1 (1), was born in 

1745, and died in 1815, unmarried. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Thomas Riddell 3 (3), eldest son of William- (1), was born Aug. 23, 
1778 ; married in January, 1805, to Jane, daughter of William Ferrier, 
of Somerford, and his wife, Lillias Wallace, heiress of the Wallaces of 
Crown Hill, Ayrshire, and had issue^ye sons and four daughters, of whom 
hereafter. He was entered as a Writer to the Signet, in the offices of his 
father, but never followed his profession. He died April 26, 1826; his 
widow died Jan. 11, 1833. 

John Riddell 3 (1), second son of William- (1), was born in 1779, and 
was a civilian in the East India Company's service, at Madras, and died 
on his passage home in 1814 ; unmarried. 

Adm'l Robert Riddell 3 (2), third son of William- (1), was born Feb. 
27, 1782. He was a rear admiral in the Royal Navy; was a very efficient 
and distinguished officer, and saw much service upon the high seas. He 
was at Copenhagen, under Nelson, and at Algiers, under Pellew. He took 
the additional name, and assumed the arms of Carre (or Kerr) on succeed- 
as the son of the younger sister. But that gentleman soon sold it, and the late Mr. 
Currie bought and entailed it. This estate is beautifully situated between the old 
Riddell House and Cavers Carre, on the river Ale. The mansion-house of Union 
Hall stood on the south side of the Ale, the property on the north side, where the 
present house of Linthill stands, having been purchased afterwards, being called 
Midlam Mill; the united properties were then called Linthill. 



BIDDELLS OF CAMIESTON, SCOTLAND. 97 

ing to the estate of Cavers Carre, on the death of his mother, who was 
heiress of that family, in 1828. He entered the navy in 1796, joining the 
"Albatross," commanded by Captain Scott, afterwards Admiral Sir George 
Scott. Previous to his leaving the "Albatross" the crew mutinied, but 
were put down by the conduct of Captain Scott and his officers, and they 
afterwards assisted in the capture of privateers. He afterwards served in 
the North Sea and Baltic stations, proceeding after those services were 
over to the East Indies in Sir Alexander-Collingwood Dickson's ship, the 
" Sceptre," seventy-four. After his return from India and further services 
in the Baltic and North Seas, he got the command of the "Britomart" in 
1812, and in that vessel he took part in the brilliant and successful battle 
of Algiers. He was promoted to the rank of post-captain in 1819, and 
finally to that of rear-admiral. He was the recipient of a medal with 
bars for Copenhagen and Algiers. He died at his residence of Cavers 
Carre in 1860. He had long been settled at Cavers, and his life in his 
retirement was like his death, calm and peaceful. He was never married. 
Succeeded by his nephew. 

Jillie Ridclell 3 (1), eldest daughter of William 2 (1), was born in 1781, 
and died in 1849; unmarried. 

Elizabeth Riddell 3 (1), second daughter of William 2 (1), was born in 
1785, and died in 1846; unmarried. 

Margaret Riddell 3 (1), third daughter of William 2 (1), was born in 
1787, and died in 1843 ; unmarried. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Gen. William Riddell 4 (2), eldest son of Thomas 3 (3), was born in 
St. George's Square, Edinburgh, Dec. 12, 1805, and succeeded his father 
at Camieston. He married April 9, 1837, to Margaret, daughter of Capt. 
John Wilkie, of the Bengal Army, and niece of Sir David Wilkie, of the 
Royal Army. He went out as a cadet in the Honourable East India 
Company's military service, in the month of April, 1823 ; and shortly 
afterwards joined as ensign the Second Battalion of the Thirtieth Native 
Infantry. In that regiment (subsequently numbered the sixtieth on the 
formation of the double battalions into single regiments), he continued to 
serve from junior ensign to lieutenant-colonel, and eventually succeeded 
to the command, which he held till his transfer, by selection, to the Thir- 
tieth Regiment of European Infantry, in 1856, which latter corps he com- 
manded throughout the eventful years of 1856-8, of the Indian Mutiny, 
till its transfer to the British service as the One Hundred and Seventh of 
the line. Besides holding several appointments in both civil and political 
employ, General Riddell was present at the siege of Bhurtpore, in 1825-6, 
at the forcing of the Khybur Pass, battles of Jagdulluch, Tezeen, and 
other actions, leading to the relief of the Jellabad garrison and the re-occu- 
pation of Cabul, in 1842, by the Army of the Indies under Maj.-Gen. Sir 
George Pollock, in whose staff he served as aide-de-camp, as well as field- 
marshal throughout the campaign in Afghanistan, also as assistant adju- 
tant-general to the Army of Reserve, under Sir Dudley Hill, during the 
Punjaub campaign of 1849, and, lastly, throughout the military campaign 
of 1857-8, in command of the Third Regiment of Bengal Europeans, as 
well as of several flying columns composed of artillery, cavalry, and 
infantry, sent out from Agra to co-operate with the Central India Field 
Force, under Sir Hugh Ross, and with the troops under the immediate com- 
mand of Lord Clyde. He was present with his regiment in the severa 
7 



98 RIDDELLS OF CAMIESTON, SCOTLAND. 

actions fought with the rebels in the vicinity of Agra, and in the Eutawa 
district toward Culpee, and on the Chumbal, and was in command of the 
fort and garrison of Agra, in which was the only remaining magazine in 
the upper provinces for some months, till after the fall of Delhi and the 
arrival of a permanent brigadier. 

General Riddell received the decoration of Companion of the Most 
Noble, the Order of the Bath, and three medals, with one bar for Bhurt- 
pore, Afghanistan, Cabal, 1842, and the military campaign, and his services 
were twice acknowledged in the government official Gazettes. He retired 
from the army as full colonel, with rank of major-general, in December, 
1861, after a continued service of upwards of thirty-eight years. He has 
been heard to remark on the pleasure it gave an old soldier to know 
when he came home to his native land that his services in the cause of his 
queen and country had been appreciated when abroad. Gen. Sir Hope 
Grant and Sir William Gomm, late field-marshal, were all in turn con- 
temporaries and companions in arms in those trying and mutinous times. 
The medals received for his services were hung by the General, with a 
kind of military pride, upon his breast, and worn on all great occasions 
in connection with the volunteer meetings held at Melrose, throughout 
the period of his residence at the "Anchorage." 

While he had reaped many honors in the far-off fields of war, of which 
he might truly be proud, he valued still more, perhaps, those distinc- 
tions for which he was frequently complimented by the acting govern- 
ment generals of the army forces, when they were inspecting the Border 
Battalion Volunteers, and by others, for his having been a general of the 
army, and yet simultaneously a full private in the ranks of the Third 
Roxburgh Rifle Volunteer Corps. 

He took an active and prominent part in the meetings of the Border 
Rifle Associations, and in the social gatherings which frequently followed. 
He was an active and honorary member of the council of the Border 
Rifle Association; also, a Commissioner of Supply, and Justice of the 
Peace. In the most of the public events of the town of Melrose, the 
General, after his retirement from the army, and during his residence at 
the "Anchorage," took a leading part, along with the principals of the 
local authority. He was a director of the Exchange Company ; took a 
deep interest in the visit of the queen at Melrose in 1867. 

He was an active and esteemed member of the Border County Associa- 
tion; and at the Scott Centenary, in 1871, was a managing committee, and 
presided at the evening gathering at the Exchange. In politics he was 
a staunch Conservative, although his principles and opinions were never 
allowed to interfere with, or influence his dealings with those who held 
Liberal, or even Radical, views. He took a deep interest in the Episcopa- 
lian church in his neighborhood, of which he was an active supporter. 
About two months before his death, which occurred June 22, 1875, he had 
an attack of paralysis, in Edinburgh ; some weeks subsequently he was 
so far recovered as to walk in his garden; but repeated attacks followed, 
and alarming tokens of his end were soon visible. He gently passed away 
among his friends and the clergy present, as if entering into a placid 
slumber. He was buried in the ancient family cemetery, in Bowden Parish. 
He had issue nine children ; he left a widow, one sou, and four daughters. 

Walter Riddell 4 (2), second son of Thomas 8 (3) of Camieston, was 
born in Edinburgh, Aug. 4, 1807; married in 1830 to Elizabeth-Riddell 
MacLauchlan, only surviving child of Lieut.-Col. Lauchlan MacLauchlan, 



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BIDDELLS OF CAMIESTON, SCOTLAND. 99 



of the Tenth Regiment ; descended from the ancient Highland family of 
MacLauchlan of Fassifern, an estate long since sold. After a long illness, 
borne with great faith and patience, his admirable wife passed away in 
1860, and he married secondly, in 1871, Mary, youngest daughter of Wil- 
liam Carrie, Esq., of Linthill, formerly of the East India Company's ser- 
vice, Madras. Mr. Riddell was educated by private tuition, and at the 
High School at Edinburgh. At about the age of seventeen he went to 
London to till a situation in an East India house, and was for many years 
confidentially employed by that firm; and on retiring from business, lived 
some years near London, eventually returning to Scotland in 1869, where 
he afterward resided, — for a time near Melrose, and latterly at Cavers 
Carre, to which property he succeeded in 1860, on the death of his uncle, 
the Vice-Admiral Robert Riddell (who had assumed the additional name 
of Carre), and at the request of his uncle took the additional name and 
arms of Carre. He was a Justice of the Peace and Commissioner of Sup- 
ply for the County of Roxburgh. In politics he was moderately Conserv- 
ative, but he disliked the turmoil of political strife, and preferred the 
quiet paths of literature. 

His acquaintance with the history of the border families was extensive 
and accurate, and he found great pleasure in imparting his knowledge 
through the press, lectures, correspondence, and conversation. He was 
an excellent lecturer, entering into his subject with much enthusiasm; and 
his elocution was characterized by grace and animation. He delivered 
several lectures on the history of the ancient families, and brought to light 
many valuable facts that would otherwise have been irrecoverably lost. 
His speeches were well prepared, and were so full of erudite and accurate 
information, that they were listened to with deep interest, and the reports 
were always read with pleasure. The mention of some old family by the 
local newspapers, often called forth a note from his pen, giving out of his 
abundant treasures valuable information. 

He was a man of large heart, and the most genial sympathies ; and 
nothing afforded him greater pleasure than to be doing good, in whatever 
form the opportunity presented itself. His habit of mind was serious and 
thoughtful, and he was strongly imbued with religious principles. He 
also took a deep interest in benevolent and religious societies, acting as 
secretary to local associations, advocating their cause on the platform, and 
lending his methodical and business-like capacities to their financial man- 
agement. He was a great favorite with those of humble rank; he was 
fond of chatting with them on the road, and dropping into their cottages, 
would inquire kindly after their welfare. 

He died at his post. He passed away at his residence at Cavers Carre * 
in December, 1874, his death being caused by a cold, which was followed 
by a severe rheumatic attack, from which the remedies applied gave him 
but little relief, and the poisoned blood found way to his head. He con- 
tinued to grow worse, and became very incoherent in his speech, and 

* The ancient house at Cavers Carre was built in 1532, as recorded on a stone, but 
has nearly disappeared. There are no less than eight stones extant that were in 
the old house, and when the new additions were made, were put into a court ; six 
of these are nearly perfect, and two of them have inscribed the arms of Riddell 
quartered with those of Carre, — two of the ancient Carres having intermarried 
with the Riddells, — the oldest bearing date 1634. The early Carres were exten- 
sive land proprietors ; but the acreage of Cavers Carre estate is now small, but has 
not passed out of the family possession. 



100 KLDDELLS OF CAMIESTON, SCOTLAND. 

finally was unconscious, and soon after breathed his last. Though advanced 
in years and not robust, his frame was so vigorous that a life prolonged 
for many years might have been exjjected. But be was prepared for the 
change which came, alas! too soon; and amid his many engrossing pur- 
suits, he was never neglectful of the great concerns of the future on which 
he has entered. He was a good man in every sense of the word. He had 
a cultured mind and a kindly heart, and was a genuine Christian. His 
mortal remains were interred at Bowden, on Dec. 7, 1874. He left a 
widow and one son, who succeeded to Cavers Carre.* 

Hon. John-Carre Kiddell 4 (2), third son of Thomas 3 (3), was born 
June 4, 1809; married in 1846, Marianna-Sibella, daughter of Justice 
Stephens, of Melbourne, and had issue three sons and three daughters, of 
whom hereafter. He emigrated to Australia many years ago, and became 
a squatter, in which position he continued a long time. He subsequently 
became interested, and successfully engaged in matters of polity, and was 
a member of the Victorian Parliament, at Melbourne, Australia. Is said to 
have been a fine-looking man. Deceased in 1880. 

Cant. Thomas Riddell 4 (4), fourth son of Thomas 8 (3), was born in 
Edinburgh (presumably), Oct. 6, 1810; married July 24, 1848, to Ann- 
Ellen, daughter of Capt. John Beckett, of the Indian Army, and had issue 
one son, of whom hereafter. He early became a soldier, and was in the 
Bengal Infantry. He was in the Punjaub campaign in 1849, with the 
Army of the Beserve, and in the Afghan campaign of 1842 ; received a 
medal for Cabul. Died in India, May 23, 1854. 

Robert Riddell 4 (3), fifth son of Thomas 3 (3), was born in the city of 
Edinburgh (presumably), Dec. 22, 1813, and died at Bombay, India, May 
29, 1839; unmarried. He was in the East India Company's service. A 
promising young man. 

Lillias-Wallace Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of Thomas 3 (3), was 
born in 1812; was married in 1840 to Ross Watt, and now (1*73) resi- 
dent in the colony of Victoria, and has issue. 

Elizabeth-Carre Riddell 4 (2), second daughter of Thomas 3 (3), was 
bom in 1816, and died, unmarried, in 1844. 

Georgina-Vereker Riddell 4 (1), third daughter of Thomas 3 (3), was 
born in 1818; was married in 1841 to Malcolm-McNeil Rind, of the Ben- 
gal medical service, who died in 1863, leaving his widow and a numerous 
family of children, f 

Jane- Ann Riddell 4 (1), fourth daughter of Thomas 3 (3), was married 

*The author of this work was for several years a constant correspondent 
with Mr. Riddell-Carre, and much of the material incorporated into this depart- 
ment of his book was forwarded by that gentleman. He was well acquainted with 
the history and genealogy of all branches of the Eiddell family, and seemed proud 
of the ancestry from which he descended. In reply to a letter in which the author 
announced the death of his aged grandfather, Mr. Riddell-Carre said, — "I was sad 
to learn of the death of your patriarchal grandfather, but you could not expect to 
keep him always, and I trust he is now with the shining ones around the throne." 
He was always ready to accede to my requests, and with irreat pains and at consid- 
erable expense, procured me portraits of eminent members of the family in Eng- 
land and Scotland, and views of their residences ; he also introduced me to gentle- 
men of prominence, with whom my subsequent correspondence proved very interest- 
ing and valuable. He always, in all his letters, manifested a deep interest in the 
undertaking of the author to compile an exhaustive family history. See his portrait 
in a group in this book ; also, view of Cavers Carre, his residence. 

t A cousin of the mother of this family, Susan E. Ferrier, wrote the very 
popular novels "Marriage," "Inheritance," and "Destiny." 



RIDDELLS OF CAMIESTON, SCOTLAND. 101 

in 1843 to Elijah Imprey, Surgeon in the Bombay Medical Establishment, 
and died in 1859, leaving her husband and children. Dr. Imprev died in 
1869. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

Thomas-Carre Riddell 5 (5), eldest son of William 4 (2), was born 
Feb. 5, 1844, and died at sea when on the way home (to Scotland) from 
Calcutta, Dec. 14, 1846. 

Walter-Ferrier Riddell 5 (3), second son of William 4 (2), was born 
Aug. 15, 1845, and died, unmarried, at Demerara, Nov. 3, 1865. He was 
ensign of the Second Battalion in the Sixteenth Regiment of Foot, in 
the East India Company's service. 

Lieut. William-Carre Riddell 5 (3), third son of William 4 (2), was 
born March 8, 1847, and succeeded his father as "younger of Camieston." 
He is an officer in the One Hundred and Third Regiment Royal Bombay 
(India) Fusileers. 

Johll-Wilkie Riddell 5 (3), fourth son of William 4 (2), was born 
March 1, 1861, and died when an infant. 

Jaiie-LilliaS Riddell 5 (2), eldest daughter of William 4 (2), was bom 
Feb. 24, 1839; died Jan. 10, 1846. 

Margaret-Sophia Riddell 5 (2), second daughter of William 4 (2), was 
born June 18, 1840; was married June 17, 1871, to Rev. James-Robert 
Crystal, d.d„ minister of Cults, in Fifeshire. 

Helen-Elizabeth Riddell 5 (1), third daughter of William 4 (2), was 
born in 1841. 

Georgina-Catherine Riddell 5 (2), fourth daughter of William 4 (2), 
was born in 1851. 

Frances-Annie Riddell 5 (2), fifth daughter of William 4 (2), was born 
in 1863. 



Capt. Thomas-Alexander Riddell 5 (6), only son of Walter 4 (2), was 
born in 1831 ; married in 1865, Elizabeth, second daughter of Alfred T. 
Fellows, Esq., of Beeston House, Nottingham, who was brother of Sir 
Charles Fellows, who received the honor of knighthood for his archseo- 
logical discoveries in Lycia, and for his success in removing the "Athenian 
Marbles" to the British Museum. Captain Riddell was formerly in the 
East India Company's service, but latterly captain and Instructor of 
Musketry in the Ayrshire and Wigtonshire militia. He succeeded to 
Cavers Carre, on the death of his father, in 1874. His father wrote the 
author of this work, only a few weeks before his lamented death, "I 
hope Cavers, so long in possession of my maternal ancestors, may pass to 
my heirs unimpaired," little thinking that he would be called to relin- 
quish so soon the property to which he referred. Like his father he 
assumed the additional surname and arms of Carre, and is the representa- 
tive of the Carres of Cavers. He has issue three children, of whom 
hereafter. 



Thomas-William Riddell 5 (7), eldest son of John 4 (2), was born in 
1852, and is presumed to be in Australia. 

John-Carre Riddell 5 (4), second son of John 4 (2), was born in 1857, 
and died in 1858, — probably in Australia. 

Walter-John-Carre Riddell 5 (4), third son of John 4 (2), was born in 
1859, and is supposed to be in Australia. 

Jane-Georgina-Vereker Riddell 5 (3), eldest daughter of John 4 (2), 
was married in 1868 to Lieutenant Stanley, Royal Army. 



102 RIDDELLS OF NEWHOUSE AND MINTO, SCOTLAND. 

Margaret-Elizabeth Riddell 5 (3), second daughter of John 4 (2), born 
in Australia. No other information. 

Anne-Carre Riddell 5 (1), third daughter of John 4 (2), was (supposed) 
born in Australia. No other information. 



Lieut. William-Henry Riddell 5 (4), only son of Thomas 4 (4), is an 
officer in the Sixteenth Regiment of Foot, British Army. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

Ralph-€rerTace RiddelF' (1), a son of Thomas 5 (6), was born in 1868, 
and was named in honor of some early ancestors of the Roxburgh family 
of Riddell. 

Elizabeth-Olive-Greva Riddell 6 (3), eldest daughter of Thomas 5 (6), 
was born Dec. 9, 1869, and was named in honor of some very early female 
members of the Riddell family. 

Grizel-C-Jeva Riddell 6 (1), second daughter of Thomas 5 (6), was born 
Oct. 6, 1871. Grizel is an old name in the family of Carre. 



RIDDELLS OF, NEWHOUSE, SCOTLAND. 

William Riddell 1 (1), third son of Andrew 15 (2), of Haining (see Rid- 
dells of Haining in the main line of Riddells of Roxburghshire), received 
for his inheritance a property called " Newhouse," an old residence in 
the parish of Lilliesleaf, near Riddell House, and this family has since 
been known by that designation. William also got a charter of Muselee 
and Mewlie in 1618, and became ancestor of the two branches of the 
old Roxburghshire tree, denominated " Riddells of Newhouse " (which 
subsequently merged into the family of Glen-Riddell, as will afterwards 
appear), and "Riddells of Muselee." • 

SECOND GENERATION. 
Rev. Simon Riddell' 2 (1), who is believed to have been descended 
from some branch of the old border family, married Miss Riddell, the 
heiress of Newhouse, and became, in right of his wife, the head of this 
family. He was a minister of considerable distinction. In 1715 he 
marched to Stirling with a portion of his parishioners in defence of His 
Majesty and the Protestant interests, and in 1740 he was one of fifteen 
ministers against deposing eight seceders, of whom were Ralph and Eben- 
ezer Erskine. Had issue one son, who became ancestor of Riddells of 
Glen-Riddell. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Walter Riddell" (1), a son of Simon- (1), married the heiress of 
Glen-Riddell, and became head of that family. 



RIDDELLS OF MINTO, SCOTLAND. 

Walter Riddell 1 (1), second son of Walter 3 (1), of Newhouse, who is 
described as "writer in Edinburgh," acquired the barony of Minto* from 

♦Minto is in Roxburghshire. The baron; formerly belonged to the Earls of 
Lennox; afterwards the property of Sir Thomas Stewart, of Garlies. The Riddells 



RIDDELLS OF MINTO, SCOTLAND. 103 

Walter Scott, of Harwood, in the year 1676, and obtained a charter under 
the Great Seal, dated June 23d of that year, under the terms of which the 
property, after his own life interest, was entailed upon his son and his 
second and younger daughters in succession, omitting his eldest daughter. 
Mr. Riddell retained Minto but a short time, and June 7, 1683, made a 
disposition of it in favor of his son-in-law, Thomas Rutherford, a brother 
of John Rutherford, of Edgerston, from whom it passed in the following 
year into other hands. (Disposition by Thomas Rutherford in favor of Mr. 
Richardson, dated July 22, 1684). But the alienation of the property 
by Walter Riddell was disputed by his children as heirs of entail, and 
legal proceedings were taken by the purchaser to enforce his rights. Ulti- 
mately, however, in the year 1687, on the purchase of the property by the 
Earl Ferras, all the surviving children (four daughters) joined in the con- 
veyance of it to him. 

Walter Riddell was twice married. The name of his first wife does 
not appear. His second wife was Isabel Riddell, but of what family I do 
not know. He had issue six children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddell 
died before January, 1685. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

James Riddell 2 (1), only son of Walter 1 (1), survived his father,' but 
was dead in the year 1687, or his name would have appeared in the alien- 
ation that year. 

Jean Riddell 2 (1), eldest daughter of Walter 1 (1), was married to 
Sir Robert Laurie, the first Baronet of Maxwelton, and had by him three 
sons and four daughters. Jean was the second wife of Sir Robert; and 
one of her daughters was "Annie Laurie," celebrated in Scottish song. 
She was famed for her beauty ; and Mr. Douglas, of Fingland, whom she had 
captivated, composed in her honor the well-known verses f which are still 

were owners between the Stewarts and Elliotts. Lord Minto informs me, that Minto 
House, his present residence, was rebuilt in 1814, but stands on the same site as 
the former one, which was the residence of the Riddells, and was supposed to be 
very ancient. Lord Minto kindly furnished the author a photo'-view of the south and 
west fronts of his magnificent and beautifully situated seat. Minto Craigs, mentioned 
by Sir Walter Scott, consist of a romantic assemblage of cliffs, which rise above 
the vale of the Tiviot, in the immediate vicinity of Minto House. A small plat- 
form on a projecting craig, commanding a beautiful prospect, is termed " Barnhills 
Bed." The character from whence the name was derived is said to have been a 
robber or outlaw. There are remains of a strong tower beneath the rocks, where 
the outlaw is supposed to have dwelt. On the summit of the craigs is the ruin of 
another tower, in a picturesque situation. Among the houses cast down by the 
Earl of Hartford in 1545, were the towers of Barnhills and Minto Craigs, with 
Minto town and place. 

t " Annie Laurie. 

" Maxwelton braes are bonnie 

Where early fa's the dew, 
And it's there that Annie Laurie 

Gie'd me her promise true — 
Gie'd me her promise true, 

Which ne'er forgot will be; 
And for bonnie Annie Laurie 

I '11 lay me downe and dee. 

" Her brow is like the snaw-drift; 
Her throat is like the swan ; 
Her face it is the fairest 
That e'er the sun shone on — 



104 BIDDALLS OF ULSTER, IRELAND. 

so popular. She was not, however, won by his poetry, but became the 
wife of Mr. Furguson, of Craigdorroch. See " Riddells of Glen-Riddell," 
in this work. The reason why Jean was excluded from the entail of Minto, 
was, no doubt, on account of her being already married to Sir Robert. 

Susanna Riddell 2 (1), second daughter of Walter 1 (1), was the wife 
of Thomas Rutherford, of Tiviotdale. 

Grizell Riddell" (1), third daughter of Walter 1 (1), died before 1687. 

Elizabeth Riddell' 2 (1), fourth daughter of Walter 1 (1), became the 
Avife of James Dallas, younger of St. Martin's. 

Agnes Riddell 2 (1), fifth daughter of Walter 1 (1), was under age and 
unmarried in January, 1687. 



RIDDALLS OF ULSTER, IRELAND. 

[Baronial Branch.] 

Sir James Riddall 1 (1), was a son of Walter 19 (9), fourth Baronet of 
Riddell, and a brother of Thomas Riddell, the first of the Camieston 
branch of the border family. This family had intermarried with the Mor- 
risons, who were obliged to leave Scotland and settle in Ulster, from 
their strict adherence to the royal cause after the battle of Worcester. 
He was knighted. Was this the Sir James Riddall (this family had 
changed the spelling to Riddall, as well as some members of the Camie- 
ston branch) who was buried in St. Mary's Church, Dublin, in 1831 ? The 
subject of this notice died issueless. 

Hans Riddall 1 (1), second son of Walter 19 (9), fourth Baronet of Rid- 
dell, was Comptroller of Customs in Derry, Ireland ; married, but died 
without issue. The name Hans was derived from the family of Hamilton, 
that settled in Ulster, and who were also connected by marriage with the 
Riddalls and Morrisons. 

John Riddall 1 (1), third son of Walter 19 (9), fourth Baronet of Rid- 
dell, removed to Ulster, Ireland, with his brother, before mentioned ; mar- 
ried, but had no children. 

Gen. William Riddall 1 (1), fourth son of Walter 19 (9), fourth Baronet 
of Riddell, was a Knight of Hanover. He was a major-general in the 
army, in the Eighteenth and Sixty-second Regiments. He died in 1851, 
issueless. 

That e'er the sun shone on — 

And dark blue is her ee ; 
And for bonnie Annie Laurie 

I '11 lay me down and dee. 

" Like dew on the gowan lying 

Is the fa' o' fairy feet; 
And like the winds in summer sighing, 

Her voice is low and sweet — 
Her voice is low and sweet — 

And she 's a' the world to me ; 
And for bonnie Annie Laurie 

I'll lay me down and dee." 



BIDDELLS OF LILLIESLEAF, SCOTLAND. 105 



RIDDELLS OF BERMUDA, WEST INDIES. 

William Riddell 1 (1) was the fourth son of Walter 19 (9), fourth Baro- 
net of Riddell (see the main line), and his wife, Miss Watt, who was a 
daughter of this baronet's stepmother. William emigrated to the West 
Indies when young, and settled in Bermuda, as a merchant-adventurer. 
He married and had issue. One of his descendants wrote a medical thesis, 
which showed a desire to benefit humanity. This branch soon became ex- 
tinct, and has now no representative. Mr. Riddell-Carre, late of Cavers, 
had promised me full information respecting this branch of the old family, 
but, alas! he died; and my very respected and reliable correspondent was 
lost to me. I think this branch reached only three generations. 



RIDDELLS OF LILLIESLEAF, SCOTLAND. 

William Riddell 1 (1), supposed to be descended from the Riddells 
of Riddell, in the parish of Lilliesleaf, married Margaret Hervey, resided 
in Lilliesleaf, and had issue five children, of whom hereafter. He was a 
carpenter by trade. I have made an effort to find where this family was 
broken off the old family-tree ; was assisted in my work by the late Wal- 
ter Riddell-Carre, of Cavers, Scotland, who had no doubt of the relation- 
ship, but could find no sufficient proof to assume the connection. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

John Riddell 2 (1), eldest son of William 1 (1), was born in the parish 
of Lilliesleaf, Roxburghshire ; married Betsey Turnbull, and had issue 
three children, of whom hereafter. He was a carpenter by trade. 

Thomas Riddell 2 (1), second son of William 1 (1), was born in the 
parish of Lilliesleaf ; married Rachel Stirling, and had issue six children, 
of whom hereafter, and died in 1843. He was a thatcher by trade. 

Walter Riddell 2 (1), third son of William 1 (1), was born in the par- 
ish of Lilliesleaf ; married Betsey Young, and died in 1843, leaving three 
children, of whom hereafter. 

Mary Riddell 2 (1), eldest daughter of William 1 (1), was born in the 
parish of Lilliesleaf; was married to Thomas Cochran, a merchant in 
Glasgow. 

Margaret Riddell 2 (1), second daughter of William 1 (1), was born in 
the parish of Lilliesleaf, and was married to James Walker, a tailor of that 

place. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

William Riddell 3 (2), only son of John' 2 (1), was born in the parish 
of Lilliesleaf; married Gothes Thompson, and had issue seven children, 
of whom hereafter. 

Mary Riddell 3 (2), only daughter of John' 2 (1), was born in the parish 
of Lilliesleaf, and had an infant the same day on which her father died 
in 1843. 

William Riddell 3 (3), eldest son of Thomas' 2 (1), was born in the 
parish of Lilliesleaf; married Agnes Deans, and had issue five children, 
of whom hereafter. 



106 Ii WD ELLS OF LILLIESLEAF, SCOTLAND. 

William Riddell 3 (4), eldest son of Walter 2 (1), was born in the par- 
ish of Lilliesleaf ; married April 23, 1872, to Maggie Lambert; emigrated 
to Philadelphia, United States, and is now residing in that city ; has two 
children, of whom hereafter. He sailed from Scotland in the steamship 
"Iowa," Captain Overstone. 

Walter Riddell 3 (2), second son of Walter- (1), was born in the par- 
ish of Lilliesleaf, and came to the United States in the steamship "Aus- 
tralia," Captain Hederwick, in 1873; now in Philadelphia. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Jane Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of William 3 (2), was born in the 
parish of Lilliesleaf, and married James Hogg. 
John Riddell 4 (2). ] 
Andrew Riddell 4 (1). | 

George g^ldell 4 (1). I Children ot - William 3 (2), of Lilliesleaf. 

Walter Riddell 4 (3). f KJy 

Betsey Riddell 4 (1). | 

Ellen Riddell 4 (1). J 



Thomas Riddell 4 (2), eldest son of William 3 (3), was born in the 
parish of Lilliesleaf, and is now in America; carpenter. 

James Riddell 4 (1), second son of William 3 (3), was born in the 
parish of Lilliesleaf; is a carpenter by trade. 

Walter Riddell 4 (4), third son of William 3 (3), was born in the par- 
ish of Lilliesleaf; has a family in Scotland; a baker. 



Walter Riddell 4 (5), eldest son of William 3 (4), was born in Phila- 
delphia, Penn., in 1873. 

James-Bambert Riddell 4 (2), second son of William 3 (4), was born 

in Philadelphia, Penn., in June, 1875. 



ANOTHER FAMILY. 



Thomas Riddell 1 (1), a son of Isabella Riddell, was born in the parish 
of Lilliesleaf, Scotland, in 1815 (father's name unknown); emigrated to 
the United States in 1820, and settled in Lawrence, Mass., where he was 
employed in the mills as a dressei-, until the late war. He married April 
15, 1856, to Sarah S. Henderson, a woman of Scotch descent, and had 
issue three sons, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddell was drowned (lost over- 
board) from a steamer between Fall River and New York, on the night 
of Dec. 27, 1862. His widow is in trade with her brother in Lawrence, 
and her sons are with their mother. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

James Riddell 2 (1), eldest son of Thomas 1 (1), was born in Lawrence, 
Mass., July 4, 1857; unmarried in 1874. 

Walter Riddell 2 (1), second son of Thomas 1 (1), was born in Lawrence, 
Mass., Sept. 12, 1859; unmarried. 

David Riddell 2 (1), third son of Thomas 1 (1), was born in Lawrence, 
Mass., Sept. 21, 1861. 



RIDDELLS OF HAWICK, SCOTLAND. 107 

RIDDELLS OF HAWICK, SCOTLAND. 

Frank Riddell 1 (1), descended from the Riddells of Riddell (parents 
unknown), was born at Hawick, Scotland, in 1724 A. D.; married Annie 
Neal in 1846, and had issue, of whom hereafter. He was a gardener by 
occupation, and lived to old age. In an old Bible found in the home of 
John Fairgreaves (whose wife was a Riddell of this family), in Bridgton, 
Me., United States, I found the records of this branch. This old book was 
published in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1734 A. D. Several members of this 
family hold the tradition that they are descended from the old branches of 
the baronial family in Roxburghshire. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

John Riddell 2 (1), eldest son of Frank 1 (1), was born at Hawick in 1758 ; 
married in 1780 to P^ggy Parris, and had issue twelve children, of whom 
hereafter. He was gardener and sexton. 

Walter Riddell' 2 (1), second son of Frank 1 (1), was born at Hawick 
in 1760 A. D. ; married Janet Hamilton, and had issue, of whom hereafter. 
He removed to Carlisle, England. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Ann Riddell 3 (1), eldest daughter of John 2 (1), was born at Hawick, 
in 1784, and died when young, a single woman. 

Isabella Riddell 3 (1), second daughter of John 2 (1), was born at 
Hawick in 1786, and died young unmarried. 

Janet Riddell 3 (1), third daughter of John 2 (1), was born at Hawick 
in 1788, and was married to Michael Dryden. 

Francis Riddell 3 (2), eldest son of John' 2 (1), was born at Hawick, 
Nov. 22, 1792 ; married Euphena Scott, and died in Northumberland, Eng. 
He drove a mail-coach about nineteen years. Issue not known. 

Isabella Riddell 3 ( 2 ), fourth daughter of John 2 (1), was born at 
Hawick, Aug. 4, 1795 ; died young. 

James Riddell 3 (1), second son of John 2 (1), was born at Hawick, 
Sept. 1, 1797 ; married Janet Ray in 1820, and had issue. He was a coach- 
man for many years. 

Adam Riddell 3 (1), third son of John 2 (1), was born at Hawick, Nov. 
29, 1798; married in 1821 to Martha Leatherhead, and resides in Edin- 
burgh. Had issue ; no names. 

John Riddell 8 (2), fourth son of John 2 (1), was born at Hawick, April 
7, 1801, and was killed in a threshing-mill, at the age of nineteen. 

Jean Riddell 3 (1), fifth daughter of John 2 (1), was born at Hawick, 
Sept. 22, 1804 ; was the wife of John Watson, of Selkirk. 

Katharine Riddell 3 (1), sixth daughter of John 2 ( 1 ), was born at 
Hawick, Sept. 22, 1806; was married to John Fairgreaves, a weaver; 
emigrated to Bridgton, Me., United States, and had issue (besides others) 
a son, who resided in Bridgton. 

John Riddell 8 (3), fifth and youngest son of John 2 (1), was born at 
Hawick, Nov. 20, 1809; married Barbara Hall, an English lady, and had 
issue. He was a coachman. 

Mary Riddell 3 (1), seventh and youngest daughter of John 2 (1), was 
born in Hawick, Feb. 9, 1810 ; died young. 



James Riddell 3 (1), eldest son of Walter 2 (1), was born at Hawick, 
April 4, 1784; married and had issue three daughters, of whom hereafter. 



108 BIDDELLS OF GALASHIELS, SCOTLAND. 



Frank Riddell 3 (3), second son of Walter 2 (1), was born at Hawick, 
June 10, 1786, and was a clerk in a store at Leith. He died when in his 
prime, unmarried. 

Willie Riddoll 3 (1), second son at Walter 2 (1), was born at Hawick, 
Oct. 14, 17*9, and settled at Carlisle, Eng. 

Isabella Riddoll 3 (3), eldest daughter of Walter 2 (1), was born at 
Hawick (or Carlisle, Eng.), Aug. 2, 1791. 

Margaret Riddell 3 (1), second daughter of Walter 2 (1), was born at 
Carlisle, Eng., Sept. 6, 1793. 

Walter Riddell 3 (2), a son of Walter 2 (l),was born at Hawick, and 
died young. He was a student for the ministry, and a very fine young 
man ; he was greatly lamented. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Nellie Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of James 3 (l),Vas born at Hawick, 
and died when young, and unmarried. 

Betsey Riddell 4 (1), second daughter of James 3 (1), was born at 
Hawick, and died young, unmarried. 

Jennie Riddell 4 (1), third daughter of James 3 (1), was born at Hawick, 
Scotland, and became the wife of John Hislop. 



RIDDELLS OF GALASHIELS, SCOTLAND. 

Walter Riddell 1 (2) (parents' names unknown) married Miss Isa- 
belle Heiton, and was a mason and builder in Galashiels. He had issue 
three children, of whom hereafter. He was a brother (presumably, as 
per tradition) of the ancestor of the family styled in this book "Ridddls 
of Hawick.'' Mrs. Riddell belonged to the ancient family of the Heitons 
of Damick Lewer ; see tale respecting the Heitons in Wilson's " Tales of 
the Border." 

SECOND GENERATION. 

John Riddell" (1), eldest son of Water 1 (1), was born in Galashiels, 
Scotland, 1796, and became a soldier in the Seventy-first Scottish Regi- 
ment. He fought and was wounded at Waterloo; became a pensioner in 
1834, and died in his seventy-second year. He married Helen, daughter of 
James Leitsh, cooper, and had issue one son, of whom hereafter. 

Thomas Riddell 2 (1), second son of Walter 1 (1), was born in Selkirk, 
Scotland, say 1798-9, and died young, unmarried. 

Mary Riddell 2 (1), only daughter of Walter 1 (1), was born at Selkirk, 
Scotland, and married Thomas Hogg, a hosier and manufacturer in Selkirk ; 



both lon£ dead. 



THIRD GENERATION. 



Walter Riddell 3 (2), only son of John 2 (1), was born in Selkirk (?), 
Scotland, Oct. 24, 1832; married Agnes Tait (she was born in 1832), and 
has had issue nine children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddell writes from 
Galashiels, and I think he resides there. 



BIT) DELLS OF TIV10TDALE, SCOTLAXD. 109 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

John Riddell 4 (2), eldest son of Walter 3 (2), was born 1854; dead. 

Janet Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of Walter 3 (2), born July 10, 1856. 

Helen Riddell 4 (1), second daughter of Walter 3 (2), born July 26, 1858. 

Frank Riddell 4 (1), second son of Walter 3 (2), was born Feb. 5, 1862. 

Elipheillia Riddell 4 (1), third daughter of Walter 3 (2), born Oct. 6, 
1865; dead. 

Mary Riddell 4 (1), third daughter of Walter 3 (2), born May 5, 1864; 
dead. 

Isabelle Riddell 4 (1), fifth daughter of Walter 3 (2), born April 12, 
1868. 

Agnes Riddell 4 (1), sixth daughter of Walter 3 (2), born Sept. 3,1870. 

Elizabeth Riddell 4 (1), seventh daughter of Walter 3 (2), born April 
17, 1873. 



RIDDELLS OF TIVIOTDALE, SCOTLAND. 

Robert Riddell 2 (1) is said to have been a native of Tiviotdale.* He 
married a lady named Agnes Scott, a native of the same locality, and a 
woman of remarkable strength of mind and excellence of character. Mr. 
Riddell was a professional shepherd, and followed this branch of husbandry 
during life. A writer describes him as "a man of strong though un- 
educated mind." He made his home for many years in a remote district 
called Langshawburn ; and while living in this " most friendly and hospi- 
table district," his humble home was frequently visited by Walter Scott, 
Pulteney Malcolm, and James Hogg, the Ettrick shepherd. He was sub- 
sequently a resident of a place called Capplefoot, and there carried on a 
farm owned by Thomas Beattie ; while resident here, and being remote 
from the school, he employed a teacher in his house to instruct his chil- 
dren. Mr. Riddell returned to his employment in the Forest of Ettrick 
under Mr. Scott, of Doleraine, to whom he had been a shepherd in his 
younger days ; with this family and that of Mr. Borthwick, all his years 
were passed, save one, since he was large enough to wear the " plaid." 
Mr. Riddell died when in the prime of life, leaving a widow and seven 
children, six sons and one daughter, of whom hereafter. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

William Riddell' 2 (1), eldest son of Robert 1 (1), was born in Tiviot- 
dale, Roxburghshire, in the year 1789 ; married to Elizabeth Mill, Jan. 6, 
1831, and followed farming and sheep-herding in his native district. He 

* I am not acquainted with the history of the ancestors of this branch of the Kid- 
dells ; have failed, after an extensive correspondence and liberal advertising, to 
trace any connection between them and the old tree planted so early in Roxburgh- 
shire. At one time there were reasons for believing that they were descended from 
the Glen-Riddell family of the same shire, but after a careful examination of the 
pedigree, no cadet was found who could have been the progenitor of this family. 
Tradition says these Riddells are an offshoot of the ancient stock at Riddell, and I 
am inclined to believe the statement ; but in the absence of proof I must leave their 
antecedents to some one who may find access to sources of information from which 
I am far removed. — Author. 



110 IUDDELLS OF TIVIOTDALE, SCOTLAND. 

died Nov. 29, 1867, having had issue seven children, of whom hereafter. 
His wife predeceased him June 14, 1853, at the age of 53 years. The 
family lived at Ramcleuchburn, Scotland. 

Borthwick Riddell" (1), second son of Robert 1 (1), was born in 
Tiviotdale, Roxburghshire ; married, and followed farming as a vocation. 
He was a distinguished performer on the bagpipe, and for many years was 
known as "Riddell, the piper." He was a large, dark man, and the 
best player on the small pipes on the Scottish border. See a lecture in 
which mention is made of his playing at the wedding of the son of the 
Duke of Buceleuch; also see Wilson's " Songs of Scotland." He played on 
many important occasions, and always won the applause of the company. 
Mr. Riddell played at Minto House when Earl Russell married a daughter 
of the Earl of Minto, — the parents of Lord Amberley, — and for this 
service was rewarded with one of the cheapest and best farms on the estate. 
No children. 

Henry-Scott Riddell - ' (1), third son of Robert 1 (1), was born at Sorbie, 
near Langholm, Sept. 23, 1798 ; married to Eliza, daughter of Mr. 
Clark, a merchant of Biggar, and by her had issue three sous, of whom 
hereafter. He spent his younger days as a shepherd with his father and 
elder brothers. His advantages for education in early life were very lim- 
ited ; sometimes his father employed a teacher in his house, and during a 
few weeks in winter sent his children to the district-school. When his 
father removed a distance from the schools, he was sometimes boarded for 
study — at Davington, Roberton and Newmill ; at each of which, he says, 
"I only remained a short time, making, I suppose, such progress as do 
other boys who love the foot-ball better than the spelling-book." He early 
manifested a preference for literature, and read all the books he could 
borrow in his neighborhood ; and when on the mountains with his Hocks, 
he constantly carried a book to these lonely solitudes, and with these si- 
lent companions and his dog, surrounded by the wild scenes of nature, he 
passed his time most pleasantly. While thus employed he commenced 
the composition of poetry and, as he has said, loved to write out the 
thoughts that came into his mind. The following lines best show the hab- 
its of the shepherd-lad at that time : — 



" My early years were passed far on 
The hills of Ettrick wild and lone ; 
Through summer sheen and winter cold, 
Tending the flocks that o'er them strolled. 
In bold, enthusiastic glee 
I sung rude strains of minstrelsy ; 
Which mingling with, died o'er the dale, 
Unheeded as the plovers' wail. 
Oft where the waving rushes shed 
A shelter frail about my head. 
Weening, though not through thoughts of fame, 
To fix on these more lasting claim, 
I'd there secure-in rustic scroll, 
The wayward fancies of my soul. 
Even where yon lofty rocks, arise, 
Hoar as the clouds on wintry skies, 
Wrapp'd in the plaid and dernel beneath 
The colder cone of drifted wreath, 
I noted them afar from ken, 
Till ink would freeze within the pen ; 
So deep the spell that bound the heart 
Into the bard's undying art — 





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BIDDELLS OF TIVIOTDALE, SCOTLAND. Ill 



So rapt the charm that still beguiled 
The minstrel of the mountain wild." 

He used to carry his scraps of poetry in his hat, and after a time, un- 
like most young authors, he got a publisher unsought for. A wind swept 
his hat away and scattered his poetic productions far over hill and dale, 
like a flock of wild fowl. He recovered a few of these, but others fell 
into strange hands aud created no little excitement in the neighborhood, 
procuring for him a popularity that never died out. So strong were the 
pressings of the muse, that he could not sleep, and frequently arose to 
note down the thoughts that seemed to come unsought, while all others 
were sound asleep. He prepared himself for college, and after the death 
of his father, having accumulated considerable means from his employ- 
ment as shepherd and his portion of the parental patrimony, he went to 
Edinburgh and entered the university there. He proved a good scholar, 
but did not apply himself to his studies with that diligence that was ex- 
ercised by some, in consequence of spending much of his time in compo- 
sition. After some time spent in study at St. Andrew's, he returned to 
the university at Edinburgh and completed his course. After becoming 
a probationer he was called to the pastoral charge of a church in the dis- 
trict, and for a time laid aside the pursuit of romantic literature. In con- 
sequence of there being no house provided for the preacher, he was under 
the necessity of traveling nine miles to the place of his professional ser- 
vices, and frequently, in bad weather, preached in a very uncomfortable 
condition, with the wet pouring from his sleeves upon the Bible before 
him, and upon the carpet at his feet. But the Duke of Buccleuch built 
a dwelling-house for him, which he occupied through the remainder of 
his life. About this time Mr. Riddell fell into a melancholy state, which 
terminated in insanity, and he was, of course, unable to attend to pastoral 
duties for a series of years. Another minister had succeeded him, and on 
his recovery he did not interfere with the new ecclesiastical arrangement; 
his procedure was generously approved by the Duke of Buccleuch, who 
conferred upon him the cottage at Tiviothead, a grant of land, and a small 
annuity. 

Mr. Riddell had formed the acquaintance of a lady of refinement and 
position, Miss Eliza Clark, when a poor shepherd-lad, and the affection 
bestowed by him was reciprocated ; but he was too independent to ask 
or receive her hand in marriage, until he had acquired an education, and 
during all his college years she remained true to her first love, refusing 
wealth and high standing in life, and braving the risk of embracing com- 
parative poverty. But when he had obtained a settlement at Tiviothead, 
he made his own by marriage her who had in heart been his during the 
long time he was in study. She was everything that would be looked for 
in the wife and mother; and during the time of his indisposition she 
proved a most constant and devoted companion. Mr. Riddell spent his re- 
maining days in comfort at his pretty cottage-home, devoting his time to 
reading, lecturing, and literature. He was highly esteemed by all, and his 
home was visited by the most distinguished men of his day. My space 
will not admit of a more extended notice of this good man, and I must re- 
fer the reader to his complete poetical works, in which a full autobiogra- 
phy, beautifully written, may be found. He died at his home at Tiviothead 
Cottage, in 1870, leaving a widow and two sons to lament his death. His 
widow died on the 29th of May, 1875, and now that they are dead, "the 



112 BIDDELLS OF T1VI0TDALE. SCOTLAND. 

hill-harps" notes of love" have gently died away, and she to whom the 
poet "waked his harp" in the "honnie greenwood bowers o' the birks and 
willows green."' lias followed him to "the names of our ain folk," and their 
mortal remains are laid in the qui< 

" Church-yard that lonely is lying 
Amid the deep greenwood by Tiviot's wild strand." 

Through the influence of Dr. Bydon, a monument to his memory, in 
the form of a large cairn, was erected in a place overlooking the poet's 
home at Tiviothead, where he lived so long, and where the most of his 
poems were composed. I subjoin some lines composed by him on the 
death of his mother, as a sample of his style. 

" The Lament. 

'• In the sadness and pomp of funeral array. 
To the grave of my father they bore her away. 
And laid her in death's silent chambers to rest, 
With the cold clay and church-yard turf over her breast, 
And bade me to weep not for her who had gone 
Away to a land where no sorrows were known; 
To weep not for her who through regions sublime 
Had traveled away from the troubles of time. 
To live in the bliss of the highest abode. 
With the angels of light and the Son of her God. 

" Yet how may it be? Can the bosom forget 
The form, though so cold, and the eye, though now set? 
Can the thoughts that away with the spirit will hie, 
And accompany it on to the bowers of the sky. 
There, lured and delighted, for ever remain. 
Xor return to the earth and its sadness again? 
Alas! there are shadows of darkness around, 
With which while below we are deeply inbouuil ; 
There is sorrow in all that we listen and see, 
And pain in the heart till the spirit be free, 
And our thoughts woe-o'erclouded, still rest on the grave 
Where slumber the forms that we longed so to save. 

" She guarded my steps when existence was young, 
Her lips o'er my cradle the lullaby sung. 
Her kindness was o'er me — her arms still caressed, 
And my head found a home on a mother's own breast ; 
And when every eyelid in slumber was closed, 
When the shade of creation o'er nature reposed, 
How oft would her bosom deep tenderness prove, 
And yearn in its hope o'er the child of her love, 
And breathe for my welfare to Heaven a prayer, 
When I knew not of danger, nor dreamt of her care! 
How then shall the power of remembrance decay 
From the form that is cold in its chamber of clay? 
How, how shall the heart, in its sadness of mood, 
Forget o'er the loss of a mother to brood? 
And when shall the radiance be shed from the sky, 
That finds not a tear-drop for her in mine eye ? 
Is the house where her accents of love wont to flow, 
Not a scene for the shadows of sadness and woe? 
Is the charm that was shed by her presence around 
Not fall'n from our life, never more to be found ? 
Do we feel not the gloom, and still live to deplore 
The loved who is fled, and no years can restore ? 

" Oh ! there was a time when our bosoms were gay 
As the skylark that welcomes the breezes of May ; 



BIDDELLS OF TIVIOTDALE, SCOTLAND. 113 

" When the heart heaved no sigh, and the eye shed no drop, 
But was mingled with joy or enlivened by hope. 
But the clouds of misfortune rose darkly the while, 
And lorded their gloom o'er the light of our smile; 
And the tempest burst forth all too fierce to be braved 
By the feeble of form, that we fain would have saved. 
It came — it hath passed, and away with it borue 
The friend of our life who can never return. 

" When the song of the bird, and the beauties of spring, 
Delight to the land of our fathers shall bring — 
When the dew-drops of morn, that no footsteps may press, 
Lie lonely and long in the forest's recess — 
When the mist of the mountain is melted away 
By the breath of the sky and the light of the day. 
And the blooms of the primrose, the flower of the thorn, 
The land of the living return to adorn ; — 
All hearts shall be gay, and in pleasure combine, 
But sorrow and sadness depart not from mine, 
Since the dwelling is dark, and the chamber is cold, 
Of her whom the living no more shall behold. 

" When our friends, who have long been away o'er the main. 
And have heard not the tale of our trial and pain. 
Shall return, and shall hope in our dwelling to find 
The friend who was here when they left us behind — 
Oh ! how, 'mid the sorrow that lies round the heart, 
Shall these lips to them e'er have the power to impart 
The tidings, that she whom they ask for has fled 
From the home of the living, to dwell with the dead ? 

" Yet, yet 'mid this cold world of death and of ill. 
A comfort remains in all suffering still, 
For sympathy lives o'er the forms that decay, 
And our hope with the dying can pass not away ; 
And when all the waste of our suffering proves vain, 
Our spirits can gather a pleasure from pain — 
A self-treasured feeling — the ofl'spring of grief, 
Which yields something more to the soul than relief. 
The grass that grows green o'er the turf of the tomb 
Relieves the dark thought from the depths of its gloom, 
And the floweret that opens its white bosom there 
Can a tale of the spirit departure declare ; 
And a feeling of joy like the power of a dream, 
Arising to life o'er the bosom would seem, 
When we think on the charms which the grave-turf has clad, 
And how nature thus stoops to hold faith with the dead. 

" Oh still, when the sun in the west sinksaway, 
And the winds from the woodlands their breathings convey — 
When the song of the blackbird, aloft on the bough, 
Is bidding to day's soft departure adieu, 
And the whispers of nature, with voice of the stream. 
Awake, and the star comes abroad with its beam, — 
I will seek the lone scene, where the relics are laid 
Of her whose bright memory remains undecayed ; 
Nor mortals shall mark there the tears that shall flow 
To pleasure the heart, as they soften its woe, 
Or know of the peace that can visit the breast 
From the thoughts of the beauty of those that are blest." 

Robert Riddell 2 (2), fourth son of Robert 1 (1), was born in Tiviot- 

dale, Roxburghshire, in 1800 ; married Margaret Johnston in 1819, and 

rented a farm in Cumberland for some years. He emigrated to America 

in 1832 ; his family consisted of ten children, of whom hereafter. He 

8 



114 BIDDELLS OF TIVIOTDALE. SCOTLAND. 

died in Rockton, Canada, Nov. 16, 1867; his widow in 1874, aged 77 
years ; she was born in Canoby. 

Alexander-Hay Kid dell- (1), fifth son of Robert 1 (1), was born in 
Tiviotdale, Roxburghshire; married, and had issue five children, three sons 
and two daughters, of whom hereafter. He carried on farming in Cum- 
berland, near Carlisle. 

Walter Riddell" (1), sixth and youngest son of Robert 1 (1), was bom 
in Tiviotdale, Roxburghshire, and died in the year 1834, unmarried. 

Mary Riddell' (1), a daughter of Robert 1 (1), was born in Tiviotdale, 

Roxburghshire; married to Jones, and had a family of ten, four 

sons and six daughters. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Margaret-Mill Riddell 3 (1), eldest daughter of William 2 (1), was 
born at Blackburn, Lauderdale, July 6, 1831 ; she was married. 

Robert-Borthwick Riddell 3 (3), eldest son of William- (1), was born 
at Ramcleuchburn, in the parish of Hawick, Feb. 21, 1833, and died 
March 29, 1862 ; unmarried. 

William-Mill Riddell 3 (2), second son of William' 2 (1), was born at 
Ramcleuchburn, parish of Hawick, July 23, 1835, and is now (1878) 
carrying on a farm of 1,600 acres at Ramcleuchburn, Tiviothead, Hawick ; 
is a shepherd and unmarried. 

James-Scott Riddell 3 (1), third son of William- (1), was born at 
Ramcleuchburn, parish of Hawick, Sept. 27, 1837 ; was married at St. 
Boswell, Bowden, Scotland, Feb. 26, 1862, to Isabella Telper, and is now 
living on a farm at Grassgarth, near Carlisle, Cumberland, Eng. He has 
issue seven children, of whom hereafter. 

Jessie Riddell 3 (1), second daughter of William' 2 (1), was born at 
Ramcleuchburn, parish of Hawick, Sept. 2, 1839; was married at the 
same place Jan. 16, 1868, to William Easton, and has three children. 

Agues-Scott Riddell 3 (1), third daughter of William' 2 (1), was born 
at Ramcleuchburn, May 24, 1842 ; was married Dec. 5, 1861, to Thomas 
Irving, of Langholm ; he died there April 6, 1870, aged 34 years, leaving 
issue, and his widow married secondly, Jan. 9, 1873, to James Lunn, watch- 
maker, of Langholm, now resident at Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Elizabeth Riddell 3 (1), youngest daughter of William 2 (1), was born 
at Ramcleuchburn, Dec. 30, 1844; died there Sept. 2, 1852. 



Walter-Scott Riddell 3 (2), eldest son of Henry' 2 (1), was born at 
Tiviothead, parish of Hawick, in 1835 ; married a daughter of the Rev. 
Dr. Arnot, of the High Church, Edinburgh, and held an office in the Hong 
Kong and Shanghai Bank, in China. He died in London in 1876, leaving 
a widow and six children, of whom hereafter. 

William-Brown-Clark Riddell 3 (3), second son of Henry 2 (1), was 
born at Flexhouse, near Hawick, Roxburghshire, Dec. 16, 1835. In his 
seventh year he was admitted a pupil in John Watson's Institution, Edin- 
burgh, where he remained till 1850, when he entered the university. 
During three sessions he prosecuted his studies with extraordinary ardor 
and success. On the commencement of a fourth session he was seized 
with an illness which completely prostrated his physical, and occasionally 
enfeebled his mental, energies. After a period of suffering, patiently 
borne, he died in his father's cottage at Tiviothead, July 20, 1856, in his 
twenty-first year. Of an intellect singularly precocious, at the early age 



BIDDELLS OF T1VI0TDALE, SCOTLAND. 115 

of seven, he composed in correct and interesting prose, and produced in 
his eighth year some vigorous poetry. With a highly retentive memory, 
he retained the results of an extended course of reading, begun almost in 
childhood. Conversant with general history, he was familiar with the 
various systems of philosophy. To an accurate knowledge of the Latin 
and Greek classics he added a correct acquaintance with many of the 
modern languages. He found consolation on his death-bed by perusing 
the Scriptures in the original tongues. He died in fervent hope and 
with Christian resignation. His was one of the most transparent intel- 
lects of his day ; his qualities of mind and heart made him greatly be- 
loved by all who knew him. The following verses were composed in his 
fourteenth year : — 

"Lament of Wallace. 

"No more by thy margin, dark Carron, 
Shall Wallace in solitude wander. 
When, tranquil, the moon shines afar on 
Thy heart-stirring- wildness and grandeur. 
For lost are to me 

Thy beauties forever; 
Since fallen in thee 
Lie the faithful and free, 
To waken, ah, never ! 

" And I, thus defeated, must suffer 

My country's reproach ; yet forsaken, 
A home to me Nature may offer 

Among her green forests of braken. 
But home who can find 

For heart-rending sorrow ? 
The wound who can bind 
When thus pierced is the mind 
By fate's ruthless arrow ? 

" 'Tis death that alone ever frees us 
Of woes too profound to be spoken, 
And nought but the grave ever eases 
The pangs of a heart that is broken. 
Then, oh ! that my blood 
In Carron's dark water 
Had mixed with the flood 
Of the warriors, shed 

'Mid torrents of slaughter. 

" For woe to the day when, desponding, 
I read in thine aspect the story 
Of those that were slain while defending 
Their homes and their mountains of glory. 
And curst be the guile 

Of treacherous knavery, 
That throws o'er our isle, 
In its tyranny vile, 

The mantle of slavery." 

Robert Riddell 8 (4), youngest son of Henry' 2 (1), was born at Tiviot- 
head, near Hawick, in the year 1840 (?), and is now somewhere in Aus- 
tralia, engaged in agriculture. He is married, but I have no account of 
his family. 

Nancy Riddell 3 (1), eldest daughter of Robert 2 (2), was born in Scot- 
land (probably in Roxburghshire) in 1820, and died at Rockton, Can., 
March 29, 1883. 



116 EIDDJELLS OF TIVIOTDALE, SCOTLAND. 

I. ii phcmia Riddell 3 (1), second daughter of Robert 2 (2), was born in 

Scotland, and died in Rockton, Can., 1*45, aged 21 years. 

Benjamin Riddell 3 (1), eldest son of Robert 2 (2), was horn in Scot- 
land, and died in Canada in 1853, aged 18 years. 

Thomas Hiddell 3 (2), second son of Robert- (2), was born in Scot- 
land, and died in Canada in 1858. 

Robert Riddell 3 (5), third son of Robert- (2), was born in Scotland 
Feb. '24, 1821; married Charlotte Barlow, May, 12, 1846, and has had 
issue fourteen children, of whom hereafter. His wife was born in 1829. 
He is a farmer at Rockton, Ontario, Can. 

Ann Riddell 8 (1), third daughter of Robert 2 (2), was born in Scot- 
land. 

Walter Riddell 3 (1), fourth son of Robert 2 (2), was born in Scot- 
land ; now living in Canada. 



Walter Riddell 3 (2), eldest son of Alexander' 2 (1); married, and is 
now living at Sceughmire, Great Orton, Carlisle, Cumberland, Eng., as a 
farmer. 

Thomas-Ramsliay Riddell 3 (1), second son of Alexander 2 (1) ; mar- 
ried, and is now (1878) living at Brampton, near Carlisle, in the north of 
England. 

Alexander-Hay Riddell 3 (2), third son of Alexander 2 (1) ; married, 
and in 1878 was living at Beck Brow, Brampton, near Carlisle, Eng. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

William Riddell 4 (4), eldest son of James 3 (1), was born at Bowden, 
Scotland, Feb. 27, 1863. 

Robert-Bothwiek Riddell 4 (6), second son of James 3 (1), was born 
at Ramcleuchburn, Scotland, March 29, 1865. 

Elizabeth-Brown Riddell 4 (2), eldest daughter of James 3 (1), was 
born at Grassgarth, Cumberland, Eng., April 12, 1868. 

James-Telfer Riddell 4 (2), third son of James 3 (1), was born at 
Grassgarth, Cumberland, Eng., July 31, 1870 ; died in ten weeks. 

Jolm-Teli'er Riddell 4 (1), fourth son of James 3 (1), was born at Grass- 
garth, Cumberland, Eng., Aug. 27, 1872. 

James-Scott Riddell 4 (3), fifth son of James 3 (1), was born at Grass- 
garth, Cumberland, Eng., Dec. 8, 1874. 

Margaret-Telfer Riddell 4 (2), second daughter of James 3 (1), was 
born at Grassgarth, Cumberland, Eng., June 3, 1877. 



Eliza-Mary Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of Walter 3 (2), was born at 
Hong Kong, China, May 22, 1867. 

Helen Riddell 4 (1), second daughter of Walter 3 (2), was born in Hong 
Kong, China, July 28, 1868. 

Henry Riddell 4 (2), eldest son of Walter 3 (2), was born in London, 
Eng., March 18, 1872. 

Agnes-Frances Riddell 4 (2), third daughter of Walter 3 (2), was born 
(presumably) in London, Eng., Nov. 4, 1872. 

David-Arnot Riddell 4 (1), son of Walter 3 (2), was born in London, 
Eng., April 3, 1875 ; twin. 

Walter-Scott Riddell 4 (3), son of Walter 8 (2), was born in London, 
Eng., April 3, 1875 ; twin. 



RIDDELS OF GLENMUICK, SCOTLAND. 117 

Robert Riddell 4 (7), eldest son of Robert 3 (5), was born in Ontario, 

Can., Nov. 16, 1846; married Hadann Wires in 1867, and has issue 

children ; resides in Rockton. 

John Riddell 4 (2), second son of Robert 3 (5), was born in Ontario, 
Can , May 22, 1848 ; resides in Rockton. 

Benjamin Riddell 4 (2), third son of Robert 3 (5), was born in Ontario, 
Can., March 26, 1850; married Mary-Ann Wires in 1869, and has issue, 
children ; resides in Rockton. 

Clarisse Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of Robert 3 (5), was born in On- 
tario, Can., March 15, 1852, and was married to John Stewart in 1866 (?). 

James Riddell 4 (4), fourth son of Robert 3 (5), was born in Ontario, 

Can., Nov. 8, 1854; married Ann Stuart in 1878, and has issue 

children. He resides in Ontario. 

Harriet-A. Riddell 4 (1), second daughter of Robert 3 (5), was born 
in Ontario, Can., Oct. 28, 1856. 

Thomas Riddell 4 (3), fifth son of Robert 3 (5), was born in Ontario, 
Can., April 24, 1859. 

Nancy-Maria Riddell 4 (2), third daughter of Robert 3 (5), was born 
in Ontario, Can., Feb. 18, 1862. 

Henry-S. Riddell 4 (3), sixth son of Robert 3 (5), was born in Ontario, 
Can., June 26, 1864 ; died March 9, 1865. 

William-H. Riddell 4 (4), seventh son of Robert 3 (5), was born in 
Ontario, Can., Dec. 17, 1865. 

Charles Riddell 4 (1), eighth son of Robert 3 (5), was born in Ontario, 
Can., Nov. 23, 1871. 

Walter Riddell 4 (4), ninth son of Robert 3 (5), was born in Ontario, 
Can., Feb. 6, 1873. 

Alexander Riddell 4 (3), tenth son of Robert 3 (5), was born in On- 
tario, Can., Nov. 28, 1874. 

George Riddell 4 (1), eleventh son of Robert 3 (5), was born in On- 
tario, Can., Jan. 4, 1878. 



RIDDELS OF GLENMUICK, ABERDEENSHIRE, SCOTLAND. 

James Riddel 1 (1), supposed to have been born at Monymusk, Scot- 
land, married Elizabeth Ross, and by her had issue eight children. The 
first wife died between 1791 and 1793, and he married secondly, Jane Gil- 
landers, by whom he had nine children. He removed in company with two 
brothers, hereafter mentioned, from Monymusk to Cobbletown, Dallamur- 
chy, in the parish of Glenmuick, Aberdeenshire, Scotland (say 1782), where 
he settled as blacksmith and reared his large family. He died at Glen- 
muicic May 24, 1823, and his widow about 1835. 

Peter Riddel 1 (1), a brother of the preceding, removed with his two 
brothers from Monymusk, Scotland, to Clackinturn, in the parish of Crath- 
ie, Aberdeenshire, and settled there as blacksmith. He married Mary 
Cragie, and had a family of ten children, of whom hereafter. It may be 
reasonably presumed that some of the Riddel families whose names are re- 
corded in this book are connected with this stock, but in the absence of 
documentary evidence I must leave the "missing link" to be found by 
others. 



118 RIDDELS OF GLENMUICK, SCOTLAND. 

Alexander Riddel 1 (1), a brother of the preceding, was probably born 

at Monymusk,* in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, and removed along with his 

two brothers, before mentioned, to near Aberdeen, but after a short stay 

returned to his native parish, where he is supposed to have died. He was 

a blacksmith by trade. I have communicated with the parish-clerk at 

Monymusk, but cannot connect any Aberdeenshire family of Riddel as 

descended from this man, although his nephew thinks he had a large 

family. 

J SECOND GENERATION. 

William Riddel" (1), eldest son of James 1 (1), was born (presumably), 
at Monymusk (although the date of birth is at Glenmuick), Sept. 24, 1779, 
and died in infancy. 

Isabella Riddel" (1), eldest daughter of James 1 (1), was born at 
Glenmuick, Aberdeenshire, Nov. 25, 1780, and died in the city of Aberdeen 
(where she had been a dressmaker), Jan. 6, 1848. 

Alexander Riddel' 2 (2), second son of James 1 (1), was born at Glen- 
muick, Aberdeenshire, in 1782 ('?), and died in infancy. 

Elizabeth Riddel' 2 (1), second daughter of James 1 (1), was born at 
Glenmuick, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, in 1784; was married to Alexander 
Morrison, shipmaster, in Aberdeen, in 1818, and died Aug. 29, 1868. 

James Riddel' 2 (2), third son of James 1 (1), was born at Glenmuick, 
Aberdeenshire, Scotland, Jan. 4, 1785; married Ann, daughter of Thomas 
McLean, plasterer, of Aberdeen (she was born April 17, 1797, and died 
Aug. 13, 1852), in 1816, and by her had issue twelve children, of whom here- 
after. Mr. Eiddel was treasurer to the Harbour Trustees of Aberdeen 
for many years. He died Nov. 16, 1842. 

Peter Riddel 2 (2), fourth son of James 1 (1), was born in Glenmuick, 
Aberdeenshire, in 1787 ('?), and settled in London, Eng., as gold- and 
silversmith. He died May 7, 1815. No account of a family. 

John Riddel' 2 (1), fifth son of James 1 (1), was born in Glenmuick, 
Aberdeenshire, June 10, 1789, and settled in London, Eng., where he died 
in September, 1856. Cabinet-maker by trade. No account of a family. 

Mary Riddel' 2 (1), third daughter of James 1 (1), was born at Glen- 
muick, Aberdeenshire, April 19, 1719; was married to William Morrison, 
of Monymusk, wood merchant, at Midmar, and died in the parish of Ban- 
shay, Invercanny, Jan. 22, 1868. Youngest child of Elizabeth Ross. 

George Riddel 2 (1), sixth son of James 1 (1), was born at Glenmuick, 
Aberdeenshire, Oct. 22, 1793; married Margaret Coults at Dorsincilley, 
Glenmuick, in April, 1818, and died May 11, 1855, at the city of Aber- 
deen, where he was a blacksmith ; he had a family of children. 

Alexander Riddel 2 (3), seventh son of James 1 (1), was born at Glen- 
muick, Aberdeenshire, May 12, 1795; married June 12, 1823, at Cortachie, 
Elizabeth Duncan, and had nine children, of whom hereafter. He was a 
blacksmith at Aboyne, on the River Dee, and hotel keeper at Bal later, in 
his native county, until infirm with old age, when he went to live with his 
daughter, Mrs. Grant, at Mill-of-Coull. He died Dec. 27, 1874 ; his wife 
predeceased him in 1871. 

Jean Riddel 2 (1), fourth daughter of James 1 (1), was born at Glen- 

*Monymlsk is between the Rivers Don and Dee, in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, and 
not more than twelve miles (according to Murray's map) from the city of Aberdeen. 
Ballater-on-the-Dee is at a railway terminus near Balmoral, the Queen's summer 
residence. Aberdeen is the principal city in the north of Scotland, situated at the 
mouth of the River Dee. 



RIDDELS OF GLENMUICK, SCOTLAND. 110 

muick, June 13, 1797 ; was married to James Ross, innkeeper, Ballater, 
in 1819, and died there Aug. 22, 1850. 

Robert Riddel" (1), eighth son of James 1 (1), was born at Glenmuick, 
Aberdeenshire, June 30, 1801. He is mentioned as a resident of Dundee, 
Scotland, but I know nothing of his history. 

Margaret Riddel 2 (1), fifth daughter of James 1 (1), was born in Glen- 
muick, Aberdeenshire, Jan. 25, 1805 ; was married to Nelson (?), and 

went to New Zealand, where it is thought she died. 

Allll Riddel 2 (1), sixth daughter of James 1 (1), was born in Glen- 
muick, Aberdeenshire, July 23, 1806. 

William Riddel 2 (2), ninth son of James 1 (1), was born at Glenmuick, 
Aberdeenshire, April 23, 1808 ; married, and had a family. He was some- 
time a coal merchant at Aberdeen, but in 1874 was said to live at Roch- 
dale, Eng. Died in 1876. 

Joseph Riddel 2 (1), tenth son of James 1 (1), was born at Glenmuick, 
Aberdeenshire, between 1808 and 1810. I have no other information con- 
cerning this man. 

Catherine Riddel 2 (1), youngest daughter of James 1 (1) and his wife, 
Elizabeth Gillanders, was born at Glenmuick, Aberdeenshire, July 11, 
1810 ; was married Sept. 25, 1836, to Francis Deans, innkeeper, near Bal- 
later, and is the only child of James Riddel, blacksmith, known to be liv- 
ing (1884). 

Jane Riddell 2 (2), a daughter of Peter 1 (1), was born in the parish of 
Crathie, Aberdeenshire. 

William Riddell 2 (3), a son of Peter 1 (1), was born in the parish of 
Crathie, Aberdeenshire ; married to Janet Gordon, and had issue. He is 
a blacksmith at Dorsincilley, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. 

Margaret Riddell 2 (2), second daughter of Peter 1 (1), was born in 
the parish of Crathie, Aberdeenshire. 

Peter Riddell 2 (3), second son of Peter 1 (1), was born in the parish 
of Crathie, Aberdeenshire. 

Catharine Riddell 2 (2), third daughter of Peter 1 (1), was born in the 
parish of Crathie, Aberdeenshire. 

Bell Riddell 2 (1), fourth daughter of Peter 1 (1), was born in the par- 
ish of Crathie, Aberdeenshire. 

Alexander Riddell 2 (4), third son of Peter 1 (1), was born in the par- 
ish of Crathie, Aberdeenshire. 

James Riddell 2 (3), fourth son of Peter 1 (1), was born in the parish 
of Crathie, Aberdeenshire, and had issue. 

Joseph Riddell 2 (2), fifth son of Peter 1 (1), was born in the parish of 
Crathie, Aberdeenshire. 

Elizabeth Riddell 2 (2), fifth daughter of Peter 1 (1), was born in the 
parish of Crathie, Aberdeenshire. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

James Riddell 3 (4), eldest son of James 2 (2) and his wife, Ann McLean, 
was born at Aberdeen, Scotland, Oct. 26, 1816; married first, at Clurry, 
Aberdeenshire, Oct. 17, 1845, to Fanny, daughter of Alexander Fowler, 
merchant, Saucher, Clurry ; secondly, at Banchoro, Ternan, Kincardine- 
shire, July 28, 1864, to Jessie-Dingwall-Fordyce, daughter of Francis 
Adams, m. d., ll. d., and thirdly, at Guananoqui, Ontario, Can., April 15, 
1869, to Margaret, daughter of Charles Fyfe, merchant, of Aberdeen. 



120 BIDDELS OF GLENMUIGK, SCOTLAND. 

Mr. Ridclell * was liberally educated for the Scots-Law, and after some 
years of professional practice in Scotland, was sent to Montreal, Canada, 
as manager of the North American British Bank, under title of "Public 
Accountant and Official Assignee, Dominion of Canada." He died at 
Montreal, Aug. 22, 1875. No mention of children. In a communication 
received from Mr. Riddell in 1873, he says: "My ancestors were a plain 
folk, respectable in their sphere, and for the most part having the inborn 
desire of the Scotch for a good education, but none of us have risen out 
of the middle classes, so that we could never dream of parading our 
names in the same category with the titled aristocracy or people of 'blue 
blood.' We are content with the social position we occupy, and have 
no wish to sneak into a better, by what I may call a fortuitous chance. 
Let me add that I speak thus, holding as I do the aristocracy of Great 
Britain, as a class, in the highest respect, and recognizing in the fullest 
extent the beneficial influence which as a whole they exert on the move- 
ments of the body politic." 

Thomas Riddell" (1), second son of James 2 (2), was born April 29, 
1818, at Aberdeen, Scotland; married July 21, 1847, to Christian Wis- 
hart, daughter of James Blyth, manufacturer, Edinburgh. He is now 
(1884) actuary and cashier North Scotland Savings Bank, Aberdeen. 

Peter Riddel 3 (4), third son of James- (2), was born Dec. 27, 1819, at 
Aberdeen, Scotland, and married, June 15, 1843, to Elizabeth, daughter of 
Daniel Anderson, shipmaster, Aberdeen, and has issue. Mr. Riddel is 
treasurer to the Harbour Commissioners, the same office held by his father, 
and is a man of good business capabilities ; an excellent penman. He has 
manifested an interest in the genealogy and history of his family, and 
kindly copied from a register of his own many names and records con- 
tained in this book, and which were " collected with care, and such 
means as were within reach were taken to secure their verification and 
fulness." 

Mr. Riddel entered the service of the Board, of which he has long been 
the chief official, in 1833, and has continued in that service ever since — 
a period of fifty years. The fact of Mr. Riddel's long* and faithful ser- 
vice was fittingly referred to by the Lord Provost at the meeting of the 
Board in 1883, and a remit made to the Shoremaster and Convenors of 
Committees to present the Treasurer, who, it was stated, desired no ma- 
terial recognition of his services, with some suitable keepsake commemo- 
rative of the occasion. The proposal was alike fitting and modest. 

Mr. Riddel was ordained to the office of deacon in the St. Clement's 
Free Church, Aberdeen, March 17, 1844. On the following June he was 
appointed session clerk. For seven years he discharged the functions of 
session clerk and clerk of deacons' court. On the 27th of June, 1847, he 
was ordained an elder of the church. During the time of his filling these 
offices he was for seven years also congregational treasurer. He resigned 
his position as session clerk in 1883, and the session, feeling themselves 
utterly unable to bestow a gift whose money value should indicate their 
appreciation of his services, decided to subscribe for a family Bible, and 
hail inscribed in it the inscription which appears on the opposite page. 

* It will be seen that James Riddell spells his name with the double I. while his 
brother, Peter of Aberdeen, Scotland, uses only one I. Peter Riddel says his ances- 
tors used only one I in their surname, and he does not understand why any of his 
friends should deviate from the orthography of their forefathers. 



RIDDELS OF GLENMUICK, SCOTLAND. 121 



" PRESENTED TO 

"Mr. PETER RIDDEL, 

" BY THE KIRK SESSION OF 

" St. Clement's Free Church, Aberdeen, 

on the occasion of his resignation of the office of Session Clerk, as a small token 
of their esteem for him as a brother elder, and of their appreciation of the ability 
and devotion evidenced in his unusually lengthened service as Clerk." 

The session, in accepting the resignation of Mr. Riddel, agreed to en- 
gross in their records the following minute, and instructed that a copy of 
it be transmitted to him : — 

"The Session deeply regret the resignation by Mr. Riddel of the office of Clerk. 
With the utmost satisfaction they would have hailed the possibility of his agreeing 
to continue his valued services, and only in deference to his expressed wish do they, 
as they now most reluctantly do, accept his resignation. They cannot, however, 
allow him to vacate a position which he has so long and worthily held for almost 
forty years — his appointment having taken place on 3rd June, 1844 — without put- 
ting on record their sense of the deep debt of obligation under which he has laid 
the Congregation for his services in the discharge of the duties of this and other 
offices, as also their own warm appreciation of the uniform courtesy and kindness 
shewn, the marked ability and deliberate judgment displayed by him in the conduct 
of the business of the Court. They most earnestly hope that though, from his very 
long tenure of the Clerkship, and also in consideration of the state of his health, he 
feels it incumbent on him to ask to be relieved, they will still have in Court, as 
often as possible, the satisfaction of his presence as its senior member, and the ben- 
efit of his wide experience and valued counsel. 

" Extracted from the records by " And. D. Donaldson, Clerk, pro tern." 

William-Ross Riddel 3 (3), fourth son of James 2 (2), was born April 
29,1821, at Aberdeen, Scotland; married March 29, 1850, to Elsy-Isa- 
bella, daughter of Alexander Paul, merchant, Bauchay, Ternan (?), and 
was at one time bank accountant at Aberdeen, Scotland. Mr. Riddel 
died Sept. 19, 1864. 

Alexander Riddel 3 (5), fifth son of James' 2 (2), was born Dec. 11, 
1822, at Aberdeen, Scotland, and died unmarried, July 16, 1843, at Cor- 
bie, parish of Marycutter, in Aberdeenshire. He was a bank clerk at Aber- 
deen. 

George Riddel 3 (2), sixth son of James 2 (2), was born at Aberdeen, 
Scotland, April 26, 1824; married Oct. 23, 1856, to Agnes, daughter of 
John Riddel, leather merchant, Aberdeen. Died Nov. 5, 1878. He was 
a commission agent in his native city. 

John Riddel 3 (3), seventh son of James 2 (2), was born at Aberdeen, 
Scotland, Nov. 9, 1825; married at Glasgow, June 15, 1854, to Mary, 
daughter of Rev. Alexander Turnbull, minister Original Session Church, 
Glasgow. Mr. Riddel is an engine draughtsman by profession. 

Isabella Riddel 3 (2), eldest daughter of James 2 (2), was born at Aber- 
deen, Scotland, Feb. 27, 1828; was married, Aug. 21, 1851, to Alexander 
Morrison, shipmaster, Aberdeen, and died in that city Feb. 25, 1870. 

Anne Riddel 3 (2), second daughter of James 2 (2), was born March 10, 
1830, at Aberdeen, Scotland; was married June 1, 1853, to James Mid- 
dlemas, clothier, Edinburgh. 

Elizabeth Riddel 3 (3), third daughter of James 2 (2), was born Aug. 
30, 1832, at Aberdeen, Scotland, and is now (1884) superintendent of The 
Rescue Home, St. John's Hill, Edinburgh. Presumed to be a single woman. 

Samuel Riddel 3 (1), seventh son of James 2 (2), was born at Aberdeen, 
Scotland, Sept. 7, 1834; married July 13, 1864, at Old Aberdeen, to Mar- 



122 RIDDELS OF GLENMUICK, SCOTLAND. 

garet, daughter of John Watt, leather merchant, Aberdeen, bank clerk, 
Glasgow. 

Mary Riddel 3 (2), fourth daughter of James 2 (2), was born at Aber- 
deen, Scotland, Oct. 18, 1836; died Jan. 8, 1840. 



George Riddell 3 (3), eldest son of George 2 (1) and his wife, Margaret 
Coults, was born at Dorsincilley, in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, June 15, 
1819 ; married Aug. 3, 1849, to Jane Coults, of Glenmuick, and had issue, 
of whom hereafter. He was a blacksmith. 

James Riddell 3 (5), second son of George' 2 (1), was born at Birkhall, 
Aberdeenshire, Dec. 29, 1821. 



James Riddell 3 (6), eldest son of Alexander 2 (3), was born in Ballater 
parish, Aberdeenshire, May 25, 1823. 

Elizabeth Riddell 3 (4), eldest daughter of Alexander 2 (3), was born in 
Ballater parish, Aberdeenshire, Dec. 20, 1824. 

Alexander Riddell 3 (6), second son of Alexander 2 (3), was born in 
Ballater parish, Aberdeen, Sept. 15, 1826. 

Jaiie Riddell 3 (3), second daughter of Alexander 2 (3), was born in 
Ballater parish, Aberdeen, Oct. 27, 1828. 

Margaret Riddell 3 (3), third daughter of Alexander 2 (3), was born in 
Ballater parish, Aberdeen, March 16, 1831. 

Catherine Riddell 3 (3), fourth daughter of Alexander 2 (3), was born 
in the parish of Ballater, Aberdeenshire, April 25, 1833. 

William Riddell 3 (4), third son of Alexander 2 (3), was born in Bal- 
later parish, Aberdeenshire, April 21,1837; served an apprenticeship as 
chemist, and sailed from the port of Glasgow on board the " Columbia," 
for New York, in 1871, since when, to 1874, his family in Scotland have 
heard nothing of him. 

Charles Riddell 3 (1), fourth son of Alexander 2 (3), was born in the 
parish of Ballater, Aberdeenshire, Jan. 12, 1840. 

Mary Riddell 3 (3), fifth daughter of Alexander 2 (3), was born in the 
parish of Ballater, Aberdeenshire, Nov. 7, 1840. 

Ellen Riddell 3 (1), daughter of Alexander 2 (3), was bom in 
the parish of Ballater, Aberdeenshire ; was married to a Mr. Stewart, 
land steward for the Earl of Aberdeen, and resides at Mill-of-Coull. Her 
father lived with her.* 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

John Riddell 4 (4-), eldest son of George 3 (3) and Jane Coults, his 
wife, was born in Glenmuick parish, Aberdeenshire, Aug. 12, 1849. 

Betsey Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of George 3 (3), was born in Glen- 
muick, Aberdeenshire, Nov. 15, 1850. 

Janet Riddell 4 (1), second daughter of George 3 (3), was born in Glen- 
muick, Aberdeenshire, Nov. 9, 1852. 

William Riddell 4 (5), second son of George 3 (3), was born in Glen- 
muick, Aberdeenshire, Sept. 14, 1854. 

*Mrs. Grant, Mill-of-Coull, Aberdeenshire, daughter of Alexander Riddell 2 (2)i in- 
forms me that her father's uncle was pressed into the Scotch army during the feudal 
wars, from which he deserted and went to America. He was mil. Name was not 
given. Probably ancestor-American of some of the United States families. Mrs. 
Grant's husband is land steward for the Earl of Aberdeen, on his Cromar estates. 



RIDDELS OF OLD MELDRUM, SCOTLAND. 123 



RIDDELLS OF ABERDEEN, SCOTLAND. 

James Riddell 1 (1), parents unknown, lived at Aberdeen, Scotland; 
married Ellen Key, and had two children. He was a chain-maker by 
trade. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

James Riddell' 2 (2), a son of James 1 (1), was born in Aberdeen, Scot- 
land ; was pressed into the British army in 1832, and sent with the Seventy- 
ninth Regiment to Canada. He married Catherine O'Connell, and had 
issue four children, of whom hereafter. He died in 1846, while serving as 
1st sergeant of Battery A, Second Artillery, U. S. Army. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Mary Riddell 3 (1). ] 

K^IKI). Children of Ja^OJ). 
John Riddell 3 (1). J 



RIDDELS OF OLD MELDRUM, SCOTLAND. 

[Aberdeenshire Branch.] 

Alexander Riddel 1 (1), supposed to have been descended from the 
same family as the " Riddells of Glenmuick, " and " Riddels of Peterhead," 
which see, was born at Old Meldrum, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, in 1767-8; 
married in 1801, at Old Mary-le-Bone Church, London, Elizabeth Turner 
(she was born in England, Oct. 14, 1800-1, and died June 15, 1850), and 
had issue four sons and one daughter, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddel 
was a coach-builder at Swallow, at Argyle Street, and at Oxford Street, 
London ; he died at the latter place Jan. 19, 1837. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Alexander Riddel 2 (2), eldest son of Alexander 1 (1), was born in 
April, 1802, in London, Eng. (?), and died unmarried in 1822. 

William Riddel 2 (1), second son of Alexander 1 (1), was born April 
11, 1805, in London, Eng. (?) ; was brought up to the business of coach- 
building; settled in Birmingham in 1838, as a percussion-cap manufactur- 
er; retired in 1854, and died in 1862, unmarried. 

John Riddel 2 (1), third son of Alexander 1 (1), was born in London, 
Eng., March 27, 1811, and succeeded to his father's business as coach- 
builder in London. He died April 10, 1845, at Harfleur, Normandy, un- 
married. 

Joseph Riddel 2 (1), fourth son of Alexander 1 (1), was born in London, 
Eng., July 31, 1818 ; married Jan. 19, 1859, to Martha, daughter of Edward- 
Hodges Baily, R. A., Fellow Royal Society, sculptor, and had issue, of 
whom hereafter. Mr. Riddel went in 1843 to Venezuela, South America, 
as secretary to Bedford-Hinton Wilson (afterwards created K. C. B.), Her 
Majesty's Charge d' Affaires and Consul General to Venezuela. Resigned 
in 1854. During five years of this period acted as Consul General in 
Caracas. Now Translator and Professor of Languages in the city of 
London. Address, 2 Gresham Buildings, Baringhall Street, E. C. He 
finished this pedigree. 



[24 RIDDELS OF PJETEBHEAD, SCOTLAND. 

Elizabeth Riddel" (1), only daughter of Alexander 1 (1), was born in 
London, Eng., Feb. -Jo, 1820; was married Dec. 7, 1846, to Edward-Wil- 
liam Wyon, sculptor, son of the late Thomas Wyon, engraver of II. M. 
Seals, an3 had five children. She is living. Her three sons have <leeeased, 
and the representation of this family devolves apon the son of her daughter 
Florence, who is the wife of Rev. Charles Goody, vicar of Whetstone 
church, High Barnet, Eng. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Alexander Riddel 3 (3), only son of Joseph 2 (1), was horn in Kent, 
Nov. 11. 1863, and died Oct. 23," 1864. 



RIDDELS OF PETERHEAD, ABERDEENSHIRE, SCOTLAND. 

John Riddel 1 (1), son of a farmer near Aberdeen, early settled near 
Peterhead, Scotland, and was probably a connection of the Riddells of 
Glenmnick, as there were branches of that family whose genealogy can- 
not be distinctly traced. He married Margaret, daughter of James Coch- 
rane, weaver. Dunbar, Scotland, in 1816, and was atone time a prosperous 
merchant at Portsea, but by intemperance squandered his property and 
became a poor man. He subsequently resided in Chatham and London, 
Eng. Had family of seven children, of whom hereafter. Have no record 
of his death, or that of his wife. His son has heard him mention "upper 

and lower Metlick." 

SECOND GENERATION. 

John Riddel 2 (2), eldest son of John 1 (1), was born near Peterhead, 
Scotland, in 1817, and died in Auckland, New Zealand, in 1876. Was 
married, but his wife's name does not appear. No account of children. 

Dr. Arellibald-A. Riddel' 2 (1), second son of John 1 (1), was born near 
Peterhead, Scotland, Dec. 10, 1819; married in 1842 to Anne Darling, of 
Toronto, Can., and has issue seven children, of whom hereafter. He came 
to Canada, about forty-two years ago, and worked in the city of 
Toronto as a practical printer for several years. He studied medi- 
cine and obtained his license in 1857. In 1859 he went to Mexico, 
and practised his profession in Monterey, San Miguel de Meygintal, and 
Fresmllo. In 1863, returned to Toronto, where his family had lived in his 
absence. He is coroner of Toronto and the County of York; has been 
city alderman. His wife has deceased. 

Isabella Riddel 2 (1), eldest daughter of John 1 (1), was born in Eng- 
land in 1821, and died unmarried. 

James Riddel 2 (1), third son of John 1 (1), was born in England, in 
1823; married Margaret Birnie (his cousin), and has had a situation in 
the House of Commons, London, Eng., for forty years. 

Catherine Riddel 2 (1), second daughter of John 1 (1), was born in 
England in 1826, and died unmarried. 

Thomas Riddel 2 (1), fourth son of John 1 (1), was born in England 
about 1828, and went from London to Australia some twenty-five years 
ago, during gold fever there. 

Alexander Riddel' 2 (1), fifth son of John 1 (1), was born in England 
about 1830, and went from London to Australia. 



RIDDLES OF HERMITAGE CASTLE, SCOTLAND. 125 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Charles-James Riddel 3 (1), eldest son of Archibald- (1), was born 
in Toronto, Can., and died young. 

John Riddel 2 (3), second son of Archibald- (1), was born in Toronto, 
Can., and died young. 

Sarah Riddel 3 (1), third daughter (living) of Archibald' 2 (1), was born 
in Toronto, Can., and was married to Henry McLaren. 

Mary-A. Riddel 3 (1), a daughter of Archibald 2 (1), was born in Toron- 
to, Can., and lives at home, unmarried. 

Margaret Riddel 3 (1), a daughter of Archibald' 2 (1), was born in To- 
ronto, Can., and lives at home, single. 

Isabella Riddel 3 (2), a daughter of Archibald' 2 (1), was born in To- 
ronto, Can., and lives at home, single. 



RIDDELS OF CUSHNIE, ABERDEENSHIRE. 

Peter Riddel' 2 (1), of Fletcher, Can., says his grandfather was a tailor 
who lived on the farm of Balnakelly, Cushnie, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, 
and had seven sons and two daughters, all of them six feet in height. From 
these sons are fifty-one grandchildren and twenty-seven great-grandchil- 
dren, some in Scotland, England, Africa, China, and Canada. The tradition 
of this family is that their ancestor was chief of the Clan Chatrina, and 
got the name Riddel in consequence of some heroic deed he had done, 
while acting in that capacity. Peter Riddel has written to Scotland for 
genealogical information, but it has not reached me. I think this family 
a connection of the Riddels of Glenmuick, and Riddels of Peterhead, in 
the same shire, from the name Peter* in these branches and the orthography 
of the surname being spelled with only one I, a form peculiar to families 
in Aberdeenshire. 



RIDDLES OF HERMITAGE CASTLE, SCOTLAND. 

William Riddle 1 (1), parents unknown, was a native of Roxburgh- 
shire, Scotland, and his family hold the tradition that they are descended 
from the ancient family of Riddell of that ilk, so long settled in Lillies- 
leaf. William married Catherine Brydon, and had issue nine children, of 
whom hereafter. He lived some time at Hermitage Castle, a place on the 
Hermitage- Water, in Castleton parish, and some of his children were 
born there. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

William Riddle 2 (2), eldest son of William 1 (1), was born at Hermit- 
age Castle, Liddesdale, Scotland, in Nov. 1801; married Jessie, daughter 

* It seems a little singular that the Christian name Feter should be almost ex- 
clusively confined to the Riddels of Aberdeenshire. This name was in the family 
of Newcastle-on-Tyne, as early as 1500. The remote ancestors are supposed to be 
from the Gleu-Riddell family, as the branch of Glenmuick use the same crest. 



126 RIDDELLS OF LIDDESDALE, SCOTLAND. 

of John and Euphemia (Hillson) Watson, of Dolphiston, Ousman parish, 
Roxburghshire; emigrated to Canada in 1831, and settled as a farmer in 
Beverly, Ont., where he resided, — a well-known and respected citizen, — 
until his death, which occurred Feb. 2, 1883. He left issue four children, 
of whom hereafter. 

John Riddle- (1), second son of William 1 (1), now living in Scotland. 
No account of his family. 

James Riddle" (1), third son of William 1 (1), was born in Liddes- 
dale, Scotland : married and had issue, of whom hereafter. Deceased. 

Thomas Riddle" (1), fourth son of William 1 (1), born in Liddesdale, 
Scotland, and settled in Ontario, Can. Married first, Elizabeth Truman, 
and had issue/fue children, of whom hereafter. He has married a second 
wife, whose maiden-name does not appear. 

Janet Riddle" (1), eldest daughter of William 1 (1), was born in Rox- 
burghshire, Scotland. 

Willhelmie Riddle 2 (1), second daughter of William 1 (1), was born 
in Roxburghshire, Scotland. 

Mary Riddle' 2 (1) 5 third daughter of William 1 (1), was born in Rox- 
burghshire, Scotland ; came to Canada with her sisters, and died in Bev- 
erly, Ont., unmarried. 

Anne Riddle' 2 (1), fourth daughter of William 1 (1), was born in Rox- 
burghshire, Scotland; emigrated to Canada; was married to Hugh Smith, 
and both have deceased. 

Catherine Riddle 2 (1), fifth daughter of William 1 (1), was born in 
Roxburghshire, Scotland ; was married to Robert Craig ; emigrated to 
Canada; died in East Middlesex County, and left issue. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

William Riddle 3 (3), eldest son of William- (2), was born in Beverly, 
Can., April 8, 1858, and lives on his father's homestead farm, unmarried 
(1883). 

John Riddle 3 (2), second son of William' 2 (2), was born in Beverly, 
Ont., April 22, 1866, and lives at home (1883). 

Enpheillia Riddle 3 (1), only daughter of William" 2 (2), was born in 
Beverly, Can., June 17, 1861. At home, unmarried (1883). 

James Riddle 3 (2), youngest son of William- (2), was born in Bev- 
erly, Ont., Oct. 13, 1867. At home and single (1883). 



William Riddle 3 (4), a son of James 2 (1), resides at No. 8 Welling- 
ton Street, Hawick, Scotland. 



RIDDELLS OF LIDDESDALE, SCOTLAND. 

James Riddell 1 (1), parents unknown, was a resident of Liddesdale, 
in Roxburghshire, Scotland, where he is believed to have been a shepherd 
and farmer. He had three sons, of whom hereafter. The family have 
lived on the banks of the Liddell for many generations, and were, — as 
stated by a descendant, — " plain Liddesdale yeomanry; frugal swains who 
fed their flocks upon the Cheviot Hills.'' *This branch of the Riddell 



BIDDELLS OF LIDDESDALE, SCOTLAND. 127 

family is supposed to be connected with other branches in the same coun- 
ty, but relationship cannot now be proven. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

James Riddell 2 (2), son of James 1 (1), was born in Liddesdale, Scot- 
land, in 1781; married Isabella, daughter of George Hogg, an officer in 
the British army, and Magdalen Van Buren,* of Hackensack, N. J. 
The permanent home of the parents of Mrs. Riddell, when the father was 
not in the army, was at Berwick-on-Tweed, in England. Mr. Riddell 
lived at Ednam, Scotland, until 1835, when he removed to Canada with 
his family. His last professional work in Scotland was surveying the 
ground of the battle-field of " Chevy Chase." He had three sons, of whom 
hereafter. Died in Canada. 

Henry Riddell" (1), a son of James 1 (1), was born in Scotland, and 
presumably died there. Query: Where did he settle ? 

William Riddell 2 (1), a son of James 1 (1), was born in Scotland, and 
is supposed to have lived and died there. 

Thomas Riddell 2 (1), a son of James 1 (1), was born in Scotland, and 
presumably died there. 

James- Vau Bureil Riddell 2 (3), son of James 1 (2), was born at Ed- 
nam, in Roxburghshire, Scotland, a place on the Eden, a tributary of the 
Tweed, and which has the honor of being the birthplace of the author of 
"The Seasons," James Thompson. He died when young, unmarried. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

George-Hogg Riddell 3 (1), son of James 2 (2), was born at Ednam, 
Scotland, and died young, unmarried. 

Dr. Alexander-Dow Riddell 3 (1), son of James 2 (2), was born at 
Ednam, a small hamlet on the Eden, Scotland, in the year 1824; married, 
in 1869, Rebecca, daughter of Dr. William Wilson, sometime of Yorkshire, 
Eng., and is now (1883) a practising physician in Compton, P. Q., Can. 
Has three children, of whom hereafter. He removed with his parents to 
Canada in 1835. After acquiring a common and classical education at 
different places in Scotland, England, and Canada, at the age of nineteen 
he commenced the study of medicine with Dr. Moses Glines, of Compton, 
Can., a gentleman of very considerable professional eminence, particularly 
in the department of surgery. Having completed the usual curriculum of 
medical lectures and hospital attendance, he received his degree of M. D. 
from the University of New York City, and subsequently became a licen- 
tiate of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Lower Canada. For 
the past thirty years he has resided in the township of Compton, jjractis- 
ing medicine and farming, and has enjoyed, during the greater part of 
that time, a somewhat extensive rural practice in Compton and the neigh- 
boring townships. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Lizzie Riddell 4 (1), daughter of Alexander 3 (1), born in Compton, 
Can., and married to Rignald" Bray, of Bayonne, N. J. 

William-Philip Riddell 4 (2), eldest son of Alexander 3 (1), born in 
Compton, Can., and now (1883) at home. 

George-Francis Riddell 4 (1), second son of Alexander 3 (1), was born 
in Compton, Can., and lives at home. 

* Daughter of James Van Buren, a physician. The marriage took place while 
New York was still in the hands of the British forces. 



128 UIDDELLS OF EAST KILBRIDE, SCOTLAND. 



RIDDELLS OF EAST KILBRIDE, SCOTLAND. 

James Ritldell 1 (1), parents' names unknown, was born in 1732; mar- 
ried Christiana Lang in 1760 (she was born at Motherwell Farm in 
1732, and died in 1818), and had issue six children, tour daughters and 
two sons, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddell was a farmer at East Kilbride, 
near Glasgow. Died in 1790. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Christina Riddell' (1), eldest daughter of James 1 (1), was born at 
East Kilbride, June 11, 1763, and was married to a man supposed to have 
been a baker by trade, but his surname is not now certainly known. 

Margaret Riddell' 2 (1), second daughter of James 1 (1), was born at 
East Kilbride, Nov. 7, 1765 : was married to John Ross. Time of decease 
not known. 

John Riddell" (1), eldest son of James 1 (1), was born at East Kil- 
bride in 1767 ; married Elizabeth Branchell, of Dunbarton, Nov. 28, 
1796, and had issue four children, three sons and a daughter, of whom 
hereafter. He resided at Glasgow; died in 1832; his widow in 1842. 

James Riddell" (2), second son of James 1 (1), was born at East Kil- 
bride (say 1769) ; no other information. 

Agues Riddell" (1), third daughter of James 1 (1), was born at East 
Kilbride, March 18, 1773, and was married to William Patterson, black- 
smith. No record of her decease. 

Jean Riddell" (1), youngest daughter of James 1 (1), was born at 

East Kilbride, March 29, 1776, and married Patterson, and became 

the mother of "long Will Patterson." 

THIRD GENERATION 

John Riddell 3 (2), eldest son of John- (1), died in infancy. 

James Riddell 3 (3), second son of John'- (1), was born in Glasgow; 
married Elizabeth Stewart in 1811, and had issue eight children, of whom 
hereafter. He died Feb. 7, 1853 ; his widow April 8, 1853. 

Rev. William Riddell 3 (1), third son of John- (1), was born at Glas- 
gow, Nov. 10, 1801, and emigrated to America in early life. Never mar- 
ried. He studied a while at Lafayette College, in Pennsylvania. Grad- 
uated at Princeton College in 1837. After leaving college he immediately 
entered the Theological Seminary at Princeton, and after a three years' 
course graduated in 1840. Was ordained as an evangelist by the Pres- 
bytery of Raritan, N. J., Oct. 5, 1841. He next appears a member of the 
Presbytery of Mississippi in 1844, in connection with which he continued 
till 1859, when having removed to the Yazoo Valley, he was transferred 
to the Presbytery of Central Mississippi. He labored as stated supply to 
several churches in the interior counties of the State till 1849, when he 
removed to a neighborhood of planters, near Port Gibson, where he taught 
the children in a private family and preached to the negroes on several 
adjoining plantations. He was engaged in this work till the war of the 
Rebellion interrupted it, when he consented reluctantly to abandon it and 
return to Scotland. (In 1859, he had removed with the family with whom 
he made his home to a plantation on the Yazoo River.) In 1862, in in- 
firm health, he left the country, sailing from New Orleans in one of the 
last vessels which left that port before the blockade was declared. He 
died at the home of Mrs. Dick, Kim, Greenock, Scotland, Dec. 7, 1876. 



RIDDELLS OF EAST KILBRIDE, SCOTLAND. 129 



While in Scotland he never (probably) exercised his ministerial office, but 
preached occasionally, and became a frequent contributor to the "Pres- 
byterian," of Philadelphia, over the signature of "Rutherglen." In per- 
sonal appearance he was diminutive, and was known as "little Mr. Rid- 
dell." His features were good, and his expression intelligent. He depre- 
ciated himself so much and morbidly, that he led others to do the same. 
He gave his confidence to few, yet his affections when bestowed were 
strong. His mind was vigorous, keen, and metaphysical ; his tastes were 
delicate, and his scholarship usually exact and comprehensive. Some of 
his papers prepared for his Presbytery were masterly. As a preacher he 
was awkward in address, and his voice low and drawling. But his ser- 
mons were rich with sound and weighty thought. He was thoroughly 
disinterested and devoted to his work among the negroes ; at the same 
time his idiosyncracies and peculiarities were an obstacle to his popularity. 
Everybody said, "Mr. Riddell is a good man." His life is said, by those 
who knew him best, to have been a shadowed one, but his death was no 
doubt a translation from darkness to light eternal. 

Elizabeth Riddell 3 (1), only daughter of John' 2 (1), was born in Glas- 
gow, in 1799; was married to John Dick (he was born in 1800), of Green- 
ock, and has issue. Living in 1883. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Mary Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of James 8 (3), was born in Glas- 
gow, Nov. 15, 1811; was married to Robert Steel; had issue, and died 
March 5, 1841. 

Aim Riddell 4 (1), second daughter of James 3 (3), was born on June 
17, 1814, and died June 21, 1823. 

John Riddell 4 (3), eldest son of James 8 (3), was born Dec. 27, 1816, 
and died June 8, 1818. 

William Riddell 4 (2), second son of James 3 (3), was born June 23, 
1819, and died March 1, 1820. 

Elizabeth Riddell 4 (2), third daughter of James 3 (3), born Aug. 4, 
1821 ; was married to John Garth, and has issue. 

James Riddell 4 (4), third son of James 3 (3), was born Nov. 15, 1824; 
married Jean Johnston, and has issue seven children, of whom hereafter. 
He resided in Glasgow, or near that city. Died. 

Catherine Riddell 4 (1), fourth daughter of James 3 (3), was born Oct. 
13, 1827, and died Nov. 1, 1829. 

Jean Riddell 4 (2), fifth daughter of James 3 (3), was born Feb. 7, 1830, 
and died Feb. 22, 1837. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

James Riddell 5 (5), eldest son of James 4 (4), was born in 1848; mar- 
ried Agnes Park in 1872, and has issue^we children, of whom hereafter. 
He resides at Gallownat, Rutherglen (near Glasgow). Has kindly fur- 
nished records of this family. 

JollU-D. Riddell 5 (4), second son of James 4 (4), was born in 1851 ; 
married Catherine Boyle in 1874, and has issue, of whom hereafter. Re- 
sides in Glasgow. 

William-D. Riddell 5 (3), third son of James 4 (4), was born in 1852 ; 
married Mary Orr, in 1873. No family (1883). 

Robert-D. Riddell 5 (1), fourth son of James 4 (4), was born in 1853 ; 
married Janet Orr, in 1880, and has one daughter (1883). 
9 



130 BIDDELLS OF WAUCHOPE, SCOTLAND. 

Mary Riddell 5 (2), eldest daughter of James 4 (4), was born in 1856, 
and married to Thomas H. Jameson in 1876. Has issue. 

Andrew Riddell 5 (1), fifth son of James 4 (4), was born in 1861. 
Neil Riddell 5 (1), sixth son of James 4 (4), was born in 1864. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

Elizabeth Riddell* (3), eldest daughter of James 5 (5), born in 1873. 
James Riddell' 1 (6), eldest son of James 5 (5), was born in 1874. 
Robert Riddell (2), second son of James 5 (5), was born in 1876. 
Jeailie Riddell 6 (3), second daughter of James 5 (5), was born in 1878. 
Robert Riddell (3), third son of James 5 (5), was born in 1880. 



Jeailie Riddell (4), daughter of John 5 (4), was born in 1876. 
James Riddell 6 (7), son of John 5 (4), was born in 1879. 



RIDDELLS OF WAUCHOPE, SCOTLAND. 

John Riddell 1 (1) was the son of a shepherd, who for about fifty years 
kept sheep at Wauchope, about twelve miles south of Hawick, and near 
the English border. The name of his mother does not appear. He mar- 
ried a Turnbull from Hawick, and had issue, of whom hereafter. He 
lived the most of his days at Clairlaw, one and a half miles from Lillies- 
leaf, where he served as shepherd thirty-seven years. He subsequently 
rented a farm near Melrose, called "Berryhill," adjoining " Abbotsford," 
the magnificent seat of Sir Walter Scott, where he continued till his death, 
at the age of 72. His widow survived her husband fourteen years, dying 
at the age of 84. Both were buried in the Bowden church-yard. Some 
now spell the name "Riddle." 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Walter Riddell 2 (1), a son of John 1 (1), was born at, or near, Edin- 
burgh, Scotland; married a Miss Baxter, and had issue, of whom here- 
after. He spent the most of his days as a farm-laborer, or foreman of 
help, near Hawick; but latterly in and about Selkirk, — for many years 
at Phillipshaugh, in the employ of the Murray family. He died at Sel- 
kirk, Jan. 8, 1881, and was buried by the side of his wife, — who died at 
Foldonside in 1857, aged 56 years, — in Bowden church-yard. 

James Riddell" (1), a son of John 1 (1), was born in Scotland ; mar- 
ried, and had issue nine children, of whom hereafter.* He resides at Gir- 
rick, between Kelso and Earlson, where he has been located about sixty 
years. He is a shepherd. 

Robert Riddell 2 (1), a son of John 1 (1), was born in Scotland; mar- 
ried Elizabeth Dixon, from near St. Boswell's, and has issue nine chil- 
dren, of whom hereafter. lie emigrated to Canada about 1827, and set- 
tled at Kirkwall, Beverly, where he "hewed out a fine farm in a Canadian 

♦Two of the sons of James' 2 (1), arc now (1884) in New Zealand; one a shep- 
herd, and the other a preacher of the gospel, sent out as an evangelist by the Pres- 
byterian church, but now a local minister. 



HIDDELLS OF WAUUHOPE, SCOTLAND. 131 



bush," and became independent. Deceased Sept. 6, 1867. Widow living 
in 1883. 

John Riddell" (2), a son of John 1 (1), was born in Scotland; married 
Margaret Grieve, daughter of a shepherd, and had nine children, of whom 
hereafter. The parents died at Foldonside, and were buried in Bowden 
church-yard. 

Margaret Riddell" (1), a daughter of John 1 (1), was born in Scot- 
land ; was married to Walter Ballantyne, stone mason (now a prosper- 
ous merchant at St. Boswell's, Scotland), and has issue. 

Turilbllll Riddell" (1), a son of John 1 (1), was born in Scotland; 
married Helen Clarkson, daughter of a gardener at Foldonside, and has 
issue, of whom hereafter. He has lived on the old farm since his father's 
death, — some thirty years. He was named for his mother's family. 

William Riddell 2 (1), a son of John 1 (1), was a shepherd at Muse- 
lee in his young days ; afterwards emigrated to Australia and made a for- 
tune, but lost heavily by endorsing notes for others. Died Avhen between 
50 and 60 years of age. No account of a family. 

Elizabeth Riddell- (1), youngest daughter of John 1 (1), was born in 
Scotland, and died young (say 30) at Berryhill. She was buried in the 
family lot in Bowden church-yard. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Jollll Riddell 3 (3), son of Walter- (1), was born near Edinburgh, Scot- 
land ; married a Miss Glendinnen, and has worked on a farm near Selkirk. 
Now (1883) aged about 55. 

James Riddell 3 (2), son of Walter 2 (1), was born near Edinburgh, 
Scotland; married a Miss Murray, and had issue five children, of whom 
hereafter. Resided in Edinburgh. Died at the age of 39 years. 

Robert Riddell 3 (2), a son of Walter- (1), was born near Edinburgh, 
Scotland, and brought up at Phillipshaugh, Selkirk. He served his ap- 
prenticeship with a blacksmith named Thomas Kedric, "a real old Scotch 
worthie." He worked in Hawick, Edinburgh, Stirling, Glasgow, and sub- 
sequently emigrated to America, coming from Bromilaw to New York in 
the ship "Britannia" in 1864. He worked in Gait, Can., in a foundry ; 
thence some time in the State of Michigan; thence returned to Canada; 
thence to St. Paul, Minn.; thence to Scotland. In 1870 he came back to 
Canada and settled in Chatham, where he worked in a ship-building and 
engineering establishment till 1872, when the company failed, and he com- 
menced business for himself as a manufacturer of ornamental wrought-iron 
fencing. He married a Miss Tocher, who came from Banffshire, Scotland, 
in 1868, and has issue five children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddell 
kindly provided this family history. 

Margaret Riddell 3 (2), eldest daughter of Robert 2 (1), was born in 
1832 (In Scotland or Canada); was married first, in 1851, to John Clark, 
who was murdered by Indians in British Columbia, in 1863, and secondly, 
in 1868, to John Wight. She had four children by her first, and six by 
her second husband. She lives on a farm in Beverly, Ont., Can. 

Christiana Riddell 8 (1), second daughter of Robert 2 (1), was born in 
Beverly, Can., in 1835 ; was married in 1856 to Francis Stalker, and has 
had nine children. Lives on a farm near Godridge, Can. 

Elizabeth Riddell 8 (1), third daughter of Robert 2 (1), was born in 
Beverly, Can., in 1837 ; and became the wife of Robert McQueen in 1863. 
No children. Husband, teacher of schools. 



132 BIDDELLS OF JEDBURGH, SCOTLAND. 

Janet Riddell 3 (1), fourth daughter of Robert- (1), was born in Bev- 
erly, Can., in 1839, and lives with her mother, single 

John Riddell 3 (5), eldest son of Robert' 2 (1), was born in Beverly, 
Can., in 1841 ; married Nellie Manson, Nov. 30, 1882, and lives on the 
homestead at Kirkwall, Out. 

Robert Riddell 3 (3), second son of Robert- (1), was born in Beverly, 
Can., in 1844; married Jane Elliott, of Scottish parentage, in January, 
1869, and has three children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddell is a farmer 
in Beverly. 

Isabella Riddell 3 (1), fifth daughter of Robert- (1), was born in Can- 
ada, in 1846; was married in January, 1870, to James Elliot, of Scottish 
descent, and has \v,\i\ four children. Her husband is a manufacturer in 
Gait, Ont., Can. 

William Riddell 3 (2), third son of Robert- (1), was born in Beverly, 
Can., in 1848; married Agnes Stewart in September, 1880, and has had 
issue four children, of whom hereafter. He lives on the parental home- 
stead at Kirkwall, Beverly, Can. 

Jaiie Riddell 3 (1), youngest daughter of Robert 2 (1), was born in Bev- 
erly, Can., in 1851 ; was married Jan. 30, 1876, to William Renwick, and 
has two daughters. Husband, a wagon-maker. 



John Riddell 3 (6). ) 

Robert Riddell 3 (4). Sons of Turnbull 2 (1) of Scotland. 

William Riddell 3 (3). ) 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Walter-Baxter Riddell 4 (2), eldest son of Robert 8 (2), was born in 
Chatham, Can., March 15, 1873. 

Willie-Tocher Riddell 4 (1), second son of Robert 3 (2), was born in 
Chatham, Can., Sept. 18, 1874. Deceased. 

James-ThomsOll Riddell 4 (3), third son of Robert 3 (2), was born in 
Chatham, Can., Sept. 14, 1876. 

Robert- John Riddell 4 (4), fourth son of Robert 8 (2), was born in 
Chatham, Can., in May 1879. 

Charles-Henry Riddell 4 (1), fifth- son of Robert 8 (2), was born in 
Chatham, Can., July 15, 1881. 



RIDDELLS OF JEDBURGH, SCOTLAND. 

Andrew Riddell 2 (1), a son of John 1 (1), was born in Roxburghshire, 
Scotland; married first, Janet Linton (no issue), and secondly, Elizabeth 
Archer, by whom he had issue nine children, of whom hereafter. He came 
from near Jedburgh to the township of Vaughn, near Toronto, Can., in 
1835. His father was a farm laborer. There were other children who 
lived in Scotland. Andrew was a farmer. He died Jan. 23, 1863, aged 
67. His wife died Feb. 8, 1872. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Margaret Riddell 3 (1), eldest daughter of Andrew 2 (1), was born in 
Scotland, March 7, 1832; was married to Henry Ward, June 22, 1857, in 
Canada, and now (1883) resides in Wellesley, Ont. 



RIDDELS OF JEDBURGH, SCOTLAND. 



133 



John Riddell 8 (2), a twin son of Andrew 2 (1), was born in Scotland, 
Feb. 26, 1834; was brought to Canada by bis parents in 1835; married 
Sarah Saltry, and resides on a farm in Ontario ; post-office, Milverton ; 
residence in Mornington, County of Perth. Eight children. 

James Riddell 3 (1), a twin son of Andrew 2 (1), was born in Scotland, 
Feb. 26, 1834; married Ann Phillips, and is now (1883) living near Mil- 
verton, Ont., or Mornington, County Perth. Farmer. Five children. 

Ellen Riddell 3 (1)- second daughter of Andrew 2 (1), was born in On- 
tario, Can., Dec. 26, 1837 ; was married Nov. 6, 1863 to David Ferguson, 
and lives in Toronto, Can. 

Andrew Riddell 3 (2 ), third son of Andrew- (1), was born in Canada, 
Feb. 29, 1840; married Louisa Phillips in August, 1864, and lives at Pres- 
ton, Grey, Ont. 

Thomas Riddell 3 (1), fourth son of Andrew 2 (1), was born in Can- 
ada, in March, 1843; married Jane Mason, May 23, 1872, and is living 
at Woodbridge, near Toronto, Ont., or Vaughan, County of York. 

William Riddell 3 (1), fifth son of Andrew 2 (1), was born in Canada, 
July 26, 1845 ; unmarried. Farmer in Selkirk, Manitoba, B. C. 

George Riddell 3 (1), sixth son of Andrew 2 (1), was born in Canada, 
in June (or July), 1847, and died Sept. 1, 1869. 

Elizabeth Riddell 3 (1), third daughter of Andrew 2 (1), was born in 
Canada, Oct. 18, 1849, and is now living in the city of Montreal. Post 
address, box 1156, care Mr. Moody. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Andrew Riddell 4 (3), son of John 8 (2), is married and living on a farm 
in Manitoba. 
George Riddell 4 (2), son of John 3 (2). 
John-James Riddell 4 (3), son of John 3 (2). 
William-Robert Riddell 4 (2), son of John 3 (2). 
Albert-Edward Riddell 4 (1), son of John 3 (2). 
David Riddell 4 (1), son of John 3 (2), 



Two daughters whose names do not appear, 



All now (1884) at 
home, in Perth, 
Ont. 



Jemima-E. Riddell 4 (1), daughter of James 3 (1). 
Ellen- Jane Riddell 4 (1), daughter of James 3 (1). 
Clara-Selina Riddell 4 (1), daughter of James 3 (1). 
James-Archer Riddell 4 (2), son of James 3 (1). 
Eliza-Ann Riddell 4 (1), daughter of James 8 (1). 



At home in 

Perth, 

Mornington 

County, Ont. 

(1884). 



Andrew-James Riddell 4 (4). 
Elizabeth-Ann Riddell 4 (2). 
George Riddell 4 (3). 
Eliza- Jane Riddell 4 (2). 
David-Farunson Riddell 4 (2). J 



| Children of Andrew 3 (2). Three 
others whose names do 
not appear. 



Elizabeth- Ann Riddell 4 (3). 
Mary-Bertha Riddell 4 (1). 
Ellen-Isabella-J. Riddell 4 (1). 
Mabel-Reatrice Riddell 4 (1). 
Ida-Muerial Riddell 4 (1). 
William-ArcheriRiddell 4 (3). 



1 



Children of Thomas 3 (1). 



134 BIDDELS OF STIRLING. SCOTLAND. 



RIDDELLS OF SELKIRK, SCOTLAND. 

William Riddell 1 (1). parents' names unknown, was born at Selkirk, 
Scotland, and had a family of sons and daughters, of whom I know only 
the following: — 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Walter Riddell 2 (1), a son of William 1 (1), was born in Selkirk, Scot- 
land : married Isabella Kedzia, who was from the State Hills, Roxburgh- 
shire, and had issue four sons and tico daughters. He lived at Hawick, 
and died there Feb. 11, 1849; his wife predeceased him in 1839. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

William Riddell 3 (2), eldest son of Walter- (1). was born at Hawick, 
Scotland: and in 1873 was in London. Ont., British North America. 



RIDDELLS OF STIRLING, SCOTLAND. 

Robert Riddell 1 (1), parents unknown, was born in Glasgow, Scot- 
land, in 1792 ; married Jane Buchanan and settled at Stirling. Weaver 
by occupation. Joined the Forty-ninth Highlanders, and went through 
the Peninsula war; was at the battle of Waterloo. Subsequently joined 
the Ninety-ninth Regiment, raised at Glasgow, and was discharged with a 
pension. Had issue ten children, of whom hereafter. He died in 1847. 
This family claims descent from the ''Riddells of Riddell," Roxburghshire. 

Aline Riddell" (1), a daughter of Robert 1 (1), was born at Stirling, 
Scotland, about 1820. 

Ellen Riddell 2 (1), a daughter of Robert 1 (1), born in 1822. 

William Riddell' (1), eldest sou of Robert 1 (1), was born at Stirling, 
Scotland, in l>i!4; learned the printer's trade; joined the Ninety-ninth 
Regiment, went to Australia, and while there deserted the army. Sup- 
posed to be dead. 

Henry Riddell' 2 (1), second son of Robert 1 (1), was born in Stirling, 
Scotland; learned the tailor's trade : enlisted in the Ninety-ninth Regi- 
ment with his brother, and deserted the army when in Australia. 

James Riddell 2 (1), third son of Robert 1 (1). was born in Stirling. 
Scotland, and in 1857 resided in Edinburgh. 

Frederick Riddell 2 (1), fourth son of Robert 1 (1), was born in Stir- 
ling:, Scotland ; no other information. 

Edward Riddell' 2 (1), fifth son of Robert 1 (1), was born at Stirling. 
Scotland; enlisted in the Forty-second Highlanders, and served in the 
East Indies thirteen years. 

David Riddell 2 (1), sixth son of Robert 1 (1), was born at Stirling, 
Scotland, and was at the siege of Canton. China, in the sixty-gun ship 
"Raynard,'' of the English navy. 

Robert Riddell 2 (2), seventh son of Robert 1 (1), was born at Stirling, 
Scotland; no other information. 

George Riddell 2 (1), eighth son of Robert 1 (1), was born at Stirling, 



RIDDELLS OF NEWCASTLE AND GATESHEAD. 135 



Scotland, in 1833; emigrated to America in 1857, and settled in Chicago, 
111. He married Mary McGary, a native of Landlord, Ireland, and has 
(1873) issue four children, as follows: — 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Mary Kiddle 3 (1) 

^zabeth MddeU 8 (1) . Children of Geo , (1) 
William Riddell 3 (2). \ ° 

Ellen Riddell 3 (2). J 



RIDDELLS OF NEWCASTLE AND GATESHEAD. 

The Riddells of Northumberland and Durham trace their lineage back 
to the same Norman ancestor as do the families of that surname in Scot- 
land ; indeed, they were originally one clan dwelling along the borders 
between England and Scotland, the boundary in early times between the 
two countries not being very well defined. From Primside, where Ger- 
\ ase Ridel, who was head of the Roxburgh family, settled, it is only three 
miles down the vale of Beaumont to the present English border, and dur- 
ing the time of the first generations of this family they probably could 
have lived on either side of the line without being questioned about their 
allegiance. It has not been clearly ascertained at what date the ancestors 
of this branch of the Ridel family established themselves in England, but 
thev were in early times situated at Norham* and T\vizel-on-the-Tweed, 
some cadets having the custody of the ancient castle at the former place. 
Surtees, in his "History and Antiquities of Durham," mentions three of 

* Norham Castle was originally built by Ralph Flambard, in 1121. It was a 
hone of contention between the English and Scotch for centuries, and was nearly 
destroyed by David, King of Scots, in 1138. Cambden describes the castle as 
having ''an outer wall of great compass, with many little towers in the angle next 
the river, and within, another circular wall much stronger, in the centre whereof 
rises a loftier tower." Part of the ruins have been undermined by the river, and 
little remains except the great keep-tower, seventy feet high, and the double gate- 
way, which led to the bridge over the ancient moat. A view of this old castle, 
where the Riddells held custody, recalls the opening lines of Marmion : — 
" Day set on Norham's castle steep, 
And Tweed's fair river, broad and deep, 

And Cheviot's mountains lone ; 
The battled towers, the donjon keep, 
The loop-hole grates, where captives weep. 
The flanking walls that round it sweep, 

In yellow lustre shone. 
The warriors on the turrets high, 
Moving athwart the evening sky, 

Seemed forms of giant hight : 
Their armour, as it caught the rays, 
Flashed back again the western blaze 
In hues of dazzling light." 

In an old history of Scotland the following relative to Norham Castle was found : 
" The provisions are three great vats of salt eels, forty-four kine, three hogsheads 
of salted salmon, forty quarters of grain, besides many cows, and four hundred 
sheep, lying uuder the castle-wall nightly ; but a number of the arrows wanted 
feathers, and a good Fletcher (arrow-maker) was required." 



136 RIDDELLS OF NEWCASTLE AND GATESHEAD. 

the successive heads of this family, Dukentinus de Ridel, Patricius de Ri- 
del, and Walter de Ridel, who appear to have held the lordship of the 
villa and manor of Whickham, in the county palitine, during the thir- 
teenth century. The documentary records relating to the early genera- 
tion are somewhat obscure and disconnected, and the printed pedigrees 
do not agree as to the head of the family. 

FIRST GENERATION. 

Sir Jordan (le Ridel 1 (1), was a son of Auskittel 1 (1), of the main 
line of the family denominated " Rid dells of Riddell," of Roxburghshire, 
Scotland, whose pedigree see in this work. His mother was evidently a 
sister of Jordanus le Flemming, and hence the name "Jordan" in the 
Ridel family. This man was a witness to a document in Scotland as early 
as 1165, and he was probably born as soon as 1140. He was a prominent 
man in his day, and called to various responsible offices. He was a knight 
and sheriff of Northumberland; acquired large estates at Tilmouth, in 
Durham, and held the moiety (lordship) of that manor during the reign 
of King Edward I. He married and had issue, but his wife's name does 
not appear. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

"Walter de Ridel" (1), son of Jordan 1 (1), succeeded to the lordship of 
the villa and manor Whickham. He was Sheriff of Northumberland, — a 
very important office at that time, — and many times employed by his sov- 
ereign on responsible commissions in the thirteenth century. He married 
and had issue ; wife's name not known. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Sir William de Ridel 3 (1), son of Walter 2 (1), was a knight. He 
was appointed Sheriff of Northumberland in 1314 (seventh and eighth 
years of King Edward II), by patent from Bishop Kellaw, Constable of 
Norham Castle, and with others of his kinsman held the custody of that 
fortress. He was likewise employed in many public services by the king. 
We are also told that William was in possession of the whole manor and 
villa of Tillmouth,* of the manor and villa of Twizel,t of the hamlets of 

* Gurdex Kiddell owned Tillmouth House in 1272; whether he was a brother 
or uncle of Sir William we do not know. 

t Twizel Castle, situated on a wooded height above the east bank of the river 
Till, is now a gaunt ruin eighty yards in front, with gaping windows, and round 
towers at the angles. It was more than forty years in building; the castle-gallery 
measures ninety feet by twenty-two. In the hollow below the castle is an ancient 
bridge, a most picturesque and lofty semi-circular arch over the Till, more than 
ninety feet in span and forty-two in height. A little below the bridge, and under 
a rock twenty feet high, is St. If' leu's Well, a petrifying spring; and a little north- 
west of Twizel, is Tillmouth. This <rlen. where the ancient Ridells owned exten- 
sive lands, and defended themselves, with their retainers, in the strongholds of 
Norham and Twizel. is romantic and delightful, with steep banks on each side, cov- 
ered with copse, particularly with hawthorn. The scenery, and fountain from 
which the Ridells slaked their thirst, are beautifully mentioned by Scott, in " Mar- 
mion," as follows : — 

" From Flodden ridge 

The Scots beheld the English host 

Leave Barmore-wood, their evening post, 

And heedful watched them as they crossed 
The Till by Twizel Bridge. 

High sight it is. and haughty, while 

They dive into the deep defile : 



BIDDELLS OF NEWCASTLE AND GATESHEAD. 137 

Dudhoe and Old Grindon, and two parts of the manor of Upsettlington, 
on the north bank of the river Tweed, about a mile south-west of Nor- 
ham. These estates, held of the Bishop of Durham by an annual rent and 
suit at court of Norham, were inherited by his three granddaughters, of 
whom hereafter, and other heirs. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

William de Ridel 4 (2),* eldest son of William 3 (1), acquired his 
father's estates and holdings, served in capacities of trust, and died dur- 
ing the reign of King Edward III, leaving his three daughters co-heirs. 
Wife's name unknown. 

Hugh de Ridel 4 (1), second son of William 3 (1), was living in the 
fourth year of King Edward III (1329), and became the representative 

head of this family. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

Isabell de Ridel 5 (1), eldest daughter of William 4 (2), was one of 
her father's co-heiresses, and became the wife of Allan Claveringe. 

Constailtilie de Ridel 5 (1), second daughter of William 4 (2), was 
co-heir with her sisters to her father's estate. She was married to Sir 
John Kynges (or Kingston), a knight, and member of one of the oldest 
and most respectable families. 

Beneath the caverned cliff they fall, 

Beneath the castle's airy wall. 

By rock, by oak, by hawthorn tree, 

Troop after troop are disappearing ; 

Troop after troop their banners rearing, 
Upon the eastern bank you see 
Still pouring down the rocky den 

Where flows the sullen Till, 
And rising from the dim-wood glen, 
Standards on standards, men on men, 

In slow succession still, 
And, sweeping o'er the Gothic arch, 
And, pressing on, in ceaseless march, 

To gain the opposing hill. 
That morn, to many a trumpet clang, 
Twizell, thy rock's deep echo rang; 
And many a chief of birth and rank, 
Saint Helen, at thy fountain drank. 
The hawthorn-glade, which now we see 
In spring-time bloom so lavishly, 
Had then from many an axe its doom, 
To give the marching columns room." 

* This Sir William Riddell was Constable of Norham Castle, being constituted 
such by Richard Kellow, Bishop of Durham, as well as bailiff of all his lands be- 
longing to it ; but the year is not given. In 1312. the first year of his being bishop, 
that prelate, as appears by a charter in the College of Arms, granted him several 
indigencies with respect to Norham. He freed him from paying suit at court, and 
all castle-rent that should be due to him during his life. At the same time he agreed 
to render him the sum of ten pounds yearly, as one of his knights. When Bishop 
Kellow surrendered Norham Castle to Edward II, for the term of three years, in 
order that it might be the means of better defending the Marches, that prince en- 
trusted the important charge of it to Sir William Riddell, as the bishop had done. 
In the year 1315, Sir William was appointed High Sheriff' of Northumberland. To 
this office was also annexed the governorship of Newcastle. In the year 1321, 
King Edward II, who seems to have held him in high esteem, addresses him as 
constable of this castle, and at the same time Andrew de Harcla, and some others, 
as sheriffs and commanders in the northern parts, to be ready to co-operate with all 



138 RIDDELLS OF NEWCASTLE AND GATESHEAD. 

Joan de Ridel 6 (1), third daughter of William 4 (2), was co-heir with 
her sisters of her father ; married Gerrard Widdrington, a member of the 
same family as the Widdringtons who have since formed alliances with 
the Riddells, whom see. 

Thomas de Ridel 5 (1), a son of Hugh 4 (1), succeeded to his father's 
possessions and the representation of this family; married and had 
issue, wife's name unknown ; made his will in the year 1358. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

Thomas de Ridel 6 (2), only known son of Thomas 5 (1), was his 
father's heir; married and had issue a son, of whom hereafter. His Avife's 
name does not appear. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Thomas Ridell 7 (3), a son of Thomas 6 (2) succeeded to the paternal 
estates, and the representation of this family. He married the daughter 
and heiress of a knight named Harbottle or Harbotal, of Northumber- 
land, and had issue, of whom hereafter. His name is spelt with the 
double letters and the omission of the intermediate "de." 

EIGHTH GENERATION. 

John Ridell 8 (1), a son of Thomas 7 (3), succeeded as his father's heir; 
married and had issue, of whom hereafter. He was Sheriff of Newcas- 
tle-on-Tyne, in 1478. 

NINTH GENERATION, 

Thomas Ridell 9 (4), eldest son of John 8 (1), was his father's successor; 
married Eleanor, daughter of Ralph Claxton, and sister of William Clax- 
ton, Esq., of Wyneyard (she was afterward married to Edward Swinburn, 
of the family of Swinburn, subsequently allied by marriage with the 
Riddells), and by her had issue, of whom hereafter. He was mayor of 
Newcastle-on-Tyne in 1510, 1521, and 1526, and " won, by his prudence 
and conscientious attention to public duties, the esteem of his constitu- 
ency." 

Peter Ridell 9 (1), second son of John 8 (1), probably died young. 



the forces they could muster against the insurgents. The great service performed 
by them, and their steady attachment, it is well known, enabled Edward to com- 
pletely crush the insurrection headed by the Earl of Lancaster, his own kinsman, 
and abetted by many powerful nobleman. 

Sir William was employed on several important occasions by King Edward. In 
1318, he was joined in commission with two others, to cause forty . . to be distrib- 
uted to the knights who had sustained losses in Northumberland by reason of the 
incursion of the Scots. In 1320, his majesty, by a writ directed to Sir William, 
delegated to him the power of admitting to the peace any of the Scotch who should 
be willing to return to their allegiance ; provided they gave proper security for their 
flood conduct in future. The following year, Sir William and others were empow- 
ered to grant letters-patent for a safe conduct to John de Pilinor, who was expected 
to come to treat on the part of the Scotch king. 

When King Edward III mounted the throne, he placed no less confidence in Sir 
William, whose fidelity to his father had been so conspicuous. In the very first 
year of his reign he commanded Sir William with others to cause the terms of truce 
with Scotland to be faithfully observed, and to see that the offenders were pun- 
ished. He did not, however,' live long to enjoy the favor of his sovereign, for he 
died in 1328, leaving three daughters, his heiresses. A part of Sir William's lands 
were held during life, by Hugh Ridell, a kinsman of Sir William. 



BIDDELLS OF NEWCASTLE AND GATESHEAD. 139 



William Ridell 9 (3), third son of John 8 (1), was mayor of Newcastle- 
on-Tyne in 1500. No account of a family. 



TENTH GENERATION. 

Peter Ridell 10 (2), eldest son of Thomas 9 (4), was his father's heir; 
he married Dorothy, daughter of John Brandling, who was mayor of the 
city of Newcastle in 1509, and a sister of Sir Ralph Brandling, Knt. 
(see "Burk's Commoners, vol. 2, page 89), and had issue, of whom here- 
after. He was a merchant-adventurer in Newcastle, in 1549. 

ELEVENTH GENERATION 

Thomas Ridell 11 (5), eldest son and heir of Peter 10 (2), died without 
children. 

Peter Ridell 11 (3), second son of Peter 10 (2), was of Newcastle-on- 
Tyne, and succeeded his brother Thomas, before mentioned. He married 
Eleanor, daughter of John Swinburn, of Newcastle, and had issue several 
children, of whom hereafter. 

William Ridell 11 (4), third son of Peter 10 (2), was of Newcastle-on- 
Tyne, a merchant-adventurer, and sheriff of that borough in 1575. Was 
mayor of Newcastle in 1582, 1590, and 1595. This worshipful citizen 
Avas married twice; his first wife, Annie, daughter and heiress of William 
Lawson, was the mother of one son, who became his father's heir. By 
the second wife, Barbara, daughter of Alderman Bertram Anderson (who 
died in 1627, and was buried on the 11th of November; her will bears 
date 30th October, 3d year of the reign of Charles I), he had eight sons 
and one daughter. 

Eleanor Ridell 11 (1), eldest daughter of Peter 10 (2) was the wife of 
Henry Lawe. 

Katherine Ridell 11 (1), second daughter of Peter 10 (2), was married 
in 1580, to Anthony Lawe. 

TWELFTH GENERATION. 

William Ridell 12 (5), eldest son of Peter 11 (3), born in 1581. 
Peter Ridell 12 (4), second son of Peter 11 (3), born in 1591. 
Thomas Ridell 12 (6), third son of Peter 11 (3), was born in 1599. 
Barbara Ridell 12 (1), a daughter of Peter 11 (3), born in 1584; was 
married, first, to John Southeron, and secondly, to Anthony Theabold. 



Sir Thomas Ridell 12 (7), the eldest son of William 11 (4), was knight- 
ed by King James I, in the first year of his reign (1603). He was Sheriff 
of Newcastle-on-Tyne in 1601 ; mayor in 1604 and 1616, and Member of 
Parliament for that borough inl620, and again with his brother Peter, be- 
fore mentioned, in 1628. He was a " Knight of Gateshead in the Palatin- 
ate of Durham." He was bailiff of Gateshead in 1605, 1614, and 1620. 
His father had obtained, in 1569, a case from the crown of coals, "cwm les 
water pytles in campis de Gatshed " ; and he himself was one of the Grand 
Lessees, as they were styled, of the Corporation of Newcastle, on the as- 
signment of Thomas Sutton, founder of the Charter House, of the Lord- 
ships of Gateshead and Whickham, and the parks, wastes, and coal mines 
belonging to them, acquired in consideration of £12,000 paid down, but said 
by Dr. Craddock, archdeacon of Northumberland, to be then worth £50,- 
000 per annum. He built him a pleasant seat out of the hospital of St. 
Edmund, in Gateshead, with an extensive prospect out on the fell, which 



140 RWDELLS OF NEWCASTLE AND GATESHEAD. 

comprised thirteen hundred acres of waste or common land. He married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Conyers, Knt., of Sockburn, and had issue. 

Sir Peter Ridell 12 (5), eldest son of William 11 (4), by his second 
wife, succeeded as his father's heir. He married, first, Isabelle, daughter of 
Mr. Alderman Atkinson, of Newcastle, and had by that lady, who died 
in 1614, four sons and four daughters. Sir Peter espoused, secondly. 
Mary, second daughter and co-heir of Thomas Surtees, Esq. (heir male of 
the Dinsdale family), and had two more daughters, of whom hereafter. 
He was Sheriff of Newcastle-on-Tyne, in 1604; mavor in 1619 and 1635; 
Member of Parliament for that borough in 1623,' 1628, and 1640. He 
inherited by will the property of a younger brother, Robert, who was a 
draper in Newcastle (certain lands in Lancashire), and became a very 
wealthy man. He died in 1640, and his dust lies within the hallowed 
precincts of St. Nicholas' Church, Newcastle-on-Tyne. 

Henry Ridell 12 (1), second son of William 11 (4), by his second wife, 
was born in 1574, and died at Elbin^e, in Germany, sine prole. 

William Ridell 12 (6), third son of William 11 (4), by second wife, was 
born in 1578 ; married and had issue ten children, of whom T have no 
particulars, but presume they became the ancestors (five were sons) of 
junior branches of the Northumberland family, whose connections can- 
not be properly made out. 

George Ridell 12 (1), fourth son of William 11 (4), by his second wife, 
was born in 1580, and died when young. 

Robert Ridell 12 (1), fifth son of William 11 (4), by his second wife, was 
born in 1582, and died young. 

Michael Ridell 12 (1), sixth son of William 11 (4), by his second wife, was 
born in 1583, and died in 1613, probably sine prole. 

John Ridell 12 (2), seventh son of William 11 (4), by his second marriage. 
I have no particulars concerning him. 

Robert Ridell 12 (2), eighth son of William 11 (4), by second wife, was 
born in 1590, and died without issue, seized of certain lands in Lancashire, 
leaving his brother, Sir Peter, his heir. He had married in 1621, Jane Cole, 
who survived as his widow in 1651. He was a draper in the city of New- 
castle, and acquired wealth. 

Alice Ridell 12 (1), only daughter of William 11 (4), was born in 1587. 
No mention of her marriage. 

THIRTEENTH GENERATION. 

Sir William Ridell 13 (7), eldest son of Thomas 1 - (7), was his father's 
heir and successor. He was in the time of Elizabeth one of the Grand 
Lessees in trust for the Corporation of Newcastle, of the Lordships of 
Gateshead and Whickham. He married first, Katherine, daughter of Sir 
Henry Widdrington, of Widdrington (this family was subsequently allied 
to that of Riddel], as will presently appear), and had an only surviving 
child, of whom hereafter. 

Sir Thomas Ridell 13 (8), second son of Thomas" ( 7 ), was a Knight of 
Fenham, recorder of Newcastle-on-Tyne, and representative of the borough 
in Parliament in 1620 and 1628. He was also Colonel of a regiment of 
foot under Charles I, and Governor of Tynemouth Castle. During the 
troubles of his time he espoused with extraordinary zeal the royal cause, 
and so distinguished himself that a reward of one thousand pounds was 
offered for his apprehension. He was a Catholic and cavalier of inflexible 
spirit ; and his mansion, which was situated a little to the east of the pres- 



EIDDELLS OF NEWCASTLE AND GATESHEAD. 141 

ent Trinity Chapel, in the High Street of Gateshead, suffered often and 
severely from the ravages of the Presbyterian forces. In the year 1640, 
while the Scottish array occupied Newcastle, he sent a petition to King 
Charles on account of the destruction of his property at the hands of the 
soldiers, whereby, as he alleged, he and his posterity were " like to be ruin- 
ated and undone." There was no help, however, under existing circum- 
stances, as will appear from the following letter, which has been considered 
by some as apocryphal. It purports to have been written by one Captain 
Leslie to Sir Thomas Ridell, of Gateshead House. It runs thus : — 

" Sik Thomas. — Between me and Gad, it maks my heart blead blued to see sic 
wark gae thro sae trim a garden as yours. I ha been twa times we my cusiu the 
Generall, and sae shall I sax times mair afore the warks gae that gate. 
But gin awe this be dune, Sir Thamas, ye maun mak the twenty pounds 
thraty, and I maun hae the tagg'd-tail trooper that stands in the staw, and the wee 
trim-gaeing thiug that stands in the newk o' the haw, chirping and chiming at the 
neun-tide o' day, and forty bows of bier to saw the maens withawe. And as I am a 
chevalier of fortin, and a limb o' the house of Rothes, as the muckle mauu kist in 
Edinburgh Auld Kirk can weel witness for these aught hundred years and mair 
bygane, nought shall skaith your house, within or without, to the valedome of a 
twapenny checken. I am your humble sarvant, John Lessley, 

Major General and Captain over sax score and twa men and some mair; Crouner 
of Cumberland, Northumberland, Murryland, and Riddesdale, the Merce, Tiviotdale, 
and Fife ; Bailie of Kirkadie ; Governor of Brunt Eland and the Bass ; Laird of 
Libertoue, Tilley and Whoolly ; Siller-Tacker of Stirling ; Constable of Leith ; and 
Sir John Lesslie, Knight, to the bute of awe that." 

After the surrender of Tyneraouth Castle, which was necessitated by 
" the pestilence having been five weeks amongst the garrison with a great 
mortalitie, soe that they were glad to yeald, and to scatter themselves 
abroad," the knight made his way to Berwick-on-Tweed, from which place 
he made his escape to the Continent in a small fishing-smack. He died at 
Antwerp in 1652, two years after the death of his father, "a broken and 
banished man," his lordship of Tunstal having previously been sold to 
satisfy the composition levied upon him, amounting to about as much as it 
was worth, in the then depressed state of the land market. He married 
in 1629, Barbara, daughter of Sir Alexander Davidson, Knight of Blakis- 
ton, and widow of Ralph Calverly, by whom he had issue, of whom here- 
after. 

Peter Ridell 13 (6), third son of Thomas 12 (7), died sine prole. 

Hon. George Ridell 13 (2), fourth son of Thomas 12 (7), born in 1602, 
was Doctor of Civil Law, Judge Advocate in the Army of the Marquis 
of Newcastle, and during the siege of Hull, in 1645 ; married Jane, daugh- 
and by her had a son and daughter, of whom hereafter. 

ter and co-heir of Eysdale, Chancellor of the Diocese of York, 

and by her had a son and daughter, of whom hereafter. 

Robert Ridell 13 (3), fifth son of Thomas 12 (7), born in 1612, married a 
French lady, named Magdalen. No account of a family, but he was pre- 
suniably ancestor of some branch of the Riddell family that cannot now 
be properly made out. 

Ephraim Ridell 13 (1), sixth son of Thomas 12 (7), born in 1615. 

Anilie Ridell 13 (2), eldest daughter of Thomas 12 (7), was the wife of 
Sir John Clavering, Knight of Callaly. 

Elizabeth Ridell 18 (1), second daughter of Thomas 12 (7), died in 1606. 

Mary Ridell 13 (1), third daughter of Thomas 12 (7), was the wife of 
Sir Francis Radcliffe, Baronet of Dilston. 



142 1UDDELLS OF NEWCASTLE AND GATESHEAD. 

Eleanor Ridell 18 (2), fourth daughter of Thomas 12 (7), bom 1610. 
Jeailie Ridell 13 (1), fifth daughter of Thomas 1 ' 2 (7), was the wife of 
John Forcer, Esq., of Harbor House, Durham. 

FOURTEENTH GENERATION. 

William Ridell 14 (8), eldest son of William 18 (7), and his wife Kath- 

erine Widdrington, was of Gateshead. He married first Isabella , and 

by her had one daughter, of whom hereafter ; his second wife was Mar- 
garet , by whom he had a son and daughter. He died in 1698. 

Thomas Riddell 14 (9), eldest son of Thomas 18 (8), succeeded his father, 
and was styled "of Fenham, in the county of Northumberland," which 
estate he sold in the year 1695, under an act of Parliament, to John Ord, 
Esq., of Newcastle. This property once belonged to the Knights of Jeru- 
salem, called " Knight Hospitallers of St. John." The estate was granted 
them by Parliament in 1324. It was annexed to the crown at the Dissolu- 
tion, but afterwards came by purchase to the Riddell family ; they held it 
for only a few generations, however, and sold it to the Ords as above 
stated. The coal mines were reserved at the time of the first sale, but 
were afterwards sold to the Ords, who held the hall and lands until about 
thirty years ago, when the mansion and about ninety acres of land were 
sold to Colonel Bell, and he and his widow held it for fifteen years ; it 
was then sold to William Pears, who held it till about 1873, when it came 
by purchase to William-Cochran Carr, of Newcastle-on-Tyne, the present 
owner. The hall and about two hundred acres of land are all that has 
been sold from the original estate by Mrs. Blackett Ord, who now owns 
large tracts of valuable land in Fenham and Benwell [vide Gazetteer], 
For the past twenty years the hall and grounds have been neglected and 
allowed to go to ruin, till by the exertions of the present proprietor it has 
been thoroughly renovated and put in fine condition (see plate view of 
Fenham Hall in this book). The grounds are beautiful, and the trees very 
large, — indeed the largest in the neighborhood, — some of them being 
thirty-six inches in diameter at five feet from the ground. The rhodo- 
dendrons on the terrace are of unusual size ; they have come down to the 
ground again, and have taken root, until from one original plant a tree 
now covers about fifty feet in area. Mr. Riddell was the first of this 
family whose name is found spelled with the double letters in full. He 
married Mary, eldest daughter of Edward Grey, Esq., of Bichfield, North- 
umberland, and had (with other daughters who all died unmarried) eight 
sons and one daughter, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddell was baptized in 
1632, and died in 1704. 

Ralph Riddell 14 (1), second son of Thomas 18 (8), was born in 1636. 
No further mention of this child. 

Barbara Riddell 14 (2), eldest daughter of Thomas 18 (8), was born in 
1630. 

Anne Riddell 14 (3), second daughter of Thomas 13 (8), born in 1632, 
was married to Francis, second son of Marmaduke Tunstal, Esq., of Wyc- 
liffe, in the County of York. 

Elizabeth Riddell 14 (2), third daughter of Thomas 18 (8), born in 1634; 
was married to Ralph Wilson, Esq., of Field House, near Gateshead, in 
the County of Durham. 

Margery Riddell 14 (1), fourth daughter of Thomas 18 (8), born in 1639; 
was living in 1661, a nun at Pointoise, in France. 



z 

x 

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r 







RIDDELLS OF SWINBURNE AND FELT ON. 143 

Jane Riddell 14 (2), fifth daughter of Thomas 13 (8), born in 1641. 
Eleanor Riddell 14 (3), sixth daughter of Thomas 13 (8), born in 1643. 
A daughter Angela died 1709, aged 65 years. 



Thomas Ridell 14 (10), only son of George 13 (2). No particulars. 
Margaret Ridell 14 (2), only known daughter of George 13 (2). 

FIFTEENTH GENERATION. 

Jane Ridell 16 (3), eldest daughter of William 14 (8), by his first wife 
Isabella, was married to Mark Riddell, m. d. 

William Ridell 15 (9), only son of William 14 (8), by his second wife 
Margaret, was his father's heir and successor. He was the last known of 
this family styled "of Gateshead," having died issueless in 1710. The 
Gateshead property seems to have passed for a time into the family of 
Clavering of Callaly, Sir John Clavering, Knt., a staunch Royalist 
throughout the civil wars, having married Annie Ridell, William's great- 
aunt. Ralph Clavering, the fourth in descent from this marriage, was an 
occasional resident at Gateshead House, during the Jacobite Rebellion ; 
and in January, 1746, when the Duke of Cumberland and his army passed 
through the town, and a vast crowd was collected by the spectacle, several 
keelmen perched themselves upon the garden-wall belonging to the Ridell 
mansion to obtain a better view, whereupon Robert Woodness, the gar- 
dener, hounded the dogs upon them. This gave such provocation to the 
mob that they broke into the garden, and proceeding from one act of de- 
struction to another, finally destroyed the house by fire, together with the 
" Popish Chapel " attached to it. And thus ended the residential connec- 
tion of the Ridell family with Gateshead ; for the house was never re- 
paired, and the materials were gradually carried away, until, in 1820, the 
ruins were entirely removed, and on the 13th of March, 1838, the last trees 
of the garden were cut down by Mr. John Hopper, miller. The only relic 
of the Ridell mansion now remaining is a gateway which stands at the 
northwest corner of the chapel. Gateshead is only separated from the 
city of Newcastle by the River Tyne, and is interesting only as a manu- 
facturing place. Here are the great grindstone-quarries from which the 
celebrated "Newcastle Grindstones" are shipped to all parts of the world. 
The early history of Gateshead is obscure. William the Conqueror de- 
feated the forces of Malcolm, King of Scotland, here in 1068. 

Catherine Ridell 15 (1), daughter of William 14 (8), died unmarried in 
1750. 

[I shall now change the designation of this family from " Riddells of 
Newcastle and Gateshead " to that of " Riddells of Swinburne and Fel- 
ton," but shall carry forward the generation figures in the same rotation 
as before. — Author.~\ 



RIDDELLS OF SWINBURNE AND FELTON. 

[Fifteenth Generation from Jordan de Ridel. ] 

Thomas Riddell 15 (11), eldest son of Thomas 14 (9), who sold Fenham 
and purchased Swinburne, was born in 1656, and died young, leaving no 
descendants. 

William Riddell 15 (10), second son of Thomas 14 (9), was born in 
1658, and died young, issueless. 



144 • BID DELLS OF SWINBUliXE AND F ELTON. 

Edward Riddell 15 (1), third son of Thomas 14 (9), was his father's heir 
and successor. Was horn in 1660, and styled "of Swinburne Castle." 
He married Dorothy, daughter of Robert Dalton, Esq., of Thurnham, in 
Lancashire, and dvintr in 1781, was succeeded by his son, of whom hereafter. 

Alexander Riddell 15 (1), fourth son of Thomas 14 (9), born in 1663. 

Mark Riddell 15 (1), m. d., fifth son of Thomas 14 (9). born in 1665; was 
a physician, sometime of Hunton, and afterwards of Morpeth. He mar- 
ried Jane, daughter of William Riddell, as before mentioned, and had 
one only son living in 1731, when his father's will was proved. This will 
w as dated 1721, and Dr." Riddell probably died about that time. 

John Riddell 15 (3), sixth son of Thomas 14 (9), died in 1672. 

Thomas Riddell 15 (12), seventh son of Thomas 14 (9). 

William Riddell 15 (11), eighth son of Thomas 14 (9). 

Elizabeth Riddell 15 (2), only daughter of Thomas 14 (9), was married 
to William Shaftoe, Esq., of Barrington. 

SIXTEENTH GENERATION. 

Thomas Riddell 16 (13), eldest son of Edward 15 (1), was styled "of 
Swinburne Castle, Esq." He married in 1726, Mary, daughter of William 
Widdrington, Esq., of Cheeseburn Grange, and sister and co-heir of Ralph 
Widdrington, by whom he had issue. This gentleman was involved in the 
rising of 1715, but saved himself by escaping from Lancashire Castle, but 
not being excepted from the general pardon, he was allowed to return to 
his estate and reside there unmolested. Swinburne Castle, the seat of this 
family, before mentioned, has a singular history. It was held with Gun- 
nerton by Peter de Gunwarton, in the time of Edward I. In 1326, it be- 
longed to John Swynburn, from whom it passed by marriage to the fam- 
ily of Widdrington ; John de Widdrington being the first heir of that 
name ; his descendants owned it in 1596. It was purchased by Thomas 
Riddell, Esq. (ante), in 1695, and has since continued in this family. The 
present castle is a very large stone building, situated on rising ground, 
and " surrounded by plantations, laid out in long straight lines, which, at 
a distance, have a dark and hard appearance." See plate view of Swin- 
burne Castle in this book. 



Edward Riddell 16 (2), only known son of Mark 15 (1) and Jane (Rid- 
dell), was living in 1731, when his father's will (dated 1721) was proved. 
He was styled " of Morpheth." 

SEVENTEENTH GENERATION. 

Thomas Riddell 17 (14), eldest son of Thomas 16 (13), was his father's 
heir and successor to Swinburne Castle. He married Elizabeth, only 
daughter and heiress of Edward Horsley Widdrington, Esq., of Felton 
Park, Northumberland, by whom he had several children, of whom here- 
after. He was engaged with his father in the insurrection of 1715, and 
was carried up to London, where, being arraigned for treason, he pleaded 
guilty, but experienced the royal mercy, and was liberated. He sold the 
collieries of Fenham, which had been reserved at the time of the disposal 
of the rest of the estate, to the Ord family. He died in 1777, and was 
succeeded by eldest son. 

Ralph Riddell 18 (2), second son of Thomas 16 (13), inherited the prop- 
erty of his uncle and namesake, Ralph Widdrington, called " Cheeseburn 
Grange," and became ancestor of the " Riddells of Cheeseburn Grange," 
which see. 






D3 
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m 




BIDDELLS OF SWINBURNE AND FELTON. 145 

Dorothy Riddell 18 (1), eldest daughter of Thomas 17 (13), died young. 

Barbara Riddell 18 (3), second daughter of Thomas 17 (13), was the 
wife of a Mr. Nelson, of Lancashire, an esquire. 

[One daughter, whose name does not appear, was the wife of 

Maxwell, Esq., of Scotland. Some say there was a son named Edward, 
who died when a child, but I cannot tell certainly about him.] 

NINETEENTH GENERATION. 

Thomas Riddell 19 (15), eldest son and heir of Thomas 18 (14), was of 
Swinburne Castle, County of Northumberland. He married, April 19, 
1790, Margaret, daughter of William Salvin, Esq., of Croxdale, and by 
her had an only son, who predeceased him. He died himself in 1798, 
and was succeeded by his youngest and only surviving brother. 

Edward-H.-Widdrington Riddell 19 (3), second son of Thomas 18 (11), 
inherited the estates of the Widdringtons through his mother, who 
was the heiress, and was consequently styled "of Felton and Horsley." 
He married, June 20, 1792, Isabella, fifth daughter of William Salvin, 
Esq., of Croxdale Hall, County of Durham, and sister of the wife of his 
brother Thomas, before mentioned ; but died without issue, Jan. 26, 1793, 
at Stella Hall, Durham. His widow was married in 1803, to Ralph 
Riddell, Esq., of Cheeseburn Grange. The manor of Felton, which came 
to this family of Riddell from the Widdringtons, comprised Old Felton, 
Acton, Swarland, Framlington, Glantlees, and Over-Isger. It anciently 
belonged to the barony of Mitford, and was given by Henry I to William 
Bertram ; but in the thirteenth year of the reign of Edward II it was 
possessed by Andromare de Valence, Earl of Pembroke, who was mur- 
dered in France, after which it passed successively to the Earls of Athol, 
the Perceys, the Scropes, the Lisles, and the Widdringtons. The prop- 
erty of Horsley came to the Riddells through the Widdringtons' inter- 
marriage with the Horsleys, an ancient Northumberland family, long seated 
at Long Horsley, whence the surname. 

Ralph Riddell 19 (1), third son of Thomas ls (11), succeeded to the 
estates of Felton and Horsley at the decease of his brother Edward, 
issueless, in 1793. He married, July 23, 1801, Elizabeth, daughter of 
Joseph Blount, Esq., second son of Michael Blount, Esq., of Maple Dur- 
ham, and had issue, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddell was passionately 
fond of rearing and training race-horses, and eminently successful on the 
" turf " ; yet he was no gambler, but of steady and retiring habits, to 
which deafness gave him more than a natural relish. His noted horse 
"Doctor Syntax," won about twenty gold cups ; another called "XYZ," — 
"that bonnie steed that bang'd them a' for pith and speed," — carried off 
nine gold cups ; and his "Don Carlos" was the winner of the same num- 
ber, when he was purchased for the Russian government, and sent over to 
that country. Mr. Riddell gave up his racing establishment a few years 
before his death, which took place on the 9th of March, 1833, when he 
was sixty-three years of age. He was a man of unbounded kindness, 
and exceeding liberality to the poor. In consequence of the steady and 
uniform adherence of this family to the Roman Catholic faith they have 
not figured in the higher offices of the county. 

Mary Riddell 19 (2), eldest daughter of Thomas 18 (14). 

Dorothy Riddell 19 (2), second daughter of Thomas 18 (14), died un- 
married. 

Elizabeth Riddell 19 (3), third daughter of Thomas 18 (14), was married 
10 



146 BIDDELLS OF SWINBUBNE AND FELT OX. 

to John Clifton, Esq., of Lytham Hall, County of Durham, and died 
Nov. 19, 1825. 

Alllie Riddell 19 (4), youngest daughter of Thomas 18 (14), was the wife 
of Sir Walter Blount, Bart., of Soddington, County of Worcester. The 
following account of the wedding will show the customs and manner of 
the festivities of those times: — "1792, Nov. 24, — being the anniversary 
of the birthday of Miss Anne Riddell, of F'elton Park, the morning was 
ushered in by the ringing of bells ; ale and other liquors were distributed 
to the populace, and the evening concluded with a dance at Felton Park. 
On the 27th, Sir Walter Blount, of Morley, in Shropshire, gave an ox to 
the inhabitants of Felton and its environs, which was roasted whole. 
Two men cooks, in proper uniforms, cut up the ox and distributed it in 
equal proportions to the people ; the bakers of the village did the same 
with the bread, and the publicans with their ale. The whole was con- 
ducted with the greatest decorum, with music and tiring of cannon. The 
favorite tune was, 'There's few good fellows when Watty 's awa'.' The 
village exhibited a scene of laudable hospitality and harmless festivity. 
On the following morning Sir Walter Blount and Miss Anne Riddell 
were united in marriage. Immediately after the ceremony they took 
their departure for his seat in Shropshire, amidst the blessings of the 
poor, and the acclamations of the populace, who unharnessed the horses 
and drew the carriage from Felton Park quite through the village. He 
gave ten pounds to the poor of the parish, and three guineas to the people 
who drew the carriage, to drink; at the same time Sir Walter ordered 
two fat sheep to be roasted and distributed, and this was accordingly 
done that day." Lady Blount died in 1823, one only son surviving her, 
the eighth and present baronet, Sir Walter Blount. 

TWENTIETH GENERATION. 

Thomas Riddell 20 (16), eldest son of Ralph 19 (4), was born May 18, 
1802; married Oct. 15, 1827, Mary, daughter of the late William Throck- 
morton, Esq., of Lincoln's Inn. He succeeded his father as heir of Swin- 
burne Castle and Felton Park, on the 19th of March, 1833. He was a 
Commissioner of the Peace for Northumberland in 1830, and sometime 
Sheriff for that county. He had four sons by his first wife, who, having 
deceased, Mr. Riddell married secondly, in 1845, Laura-Anna, daughter 
of Thomas-Joseph de Tafford, Bart., of Tafford Park, County of Lan- 
caster, and by her had issue. He died at his seat, Felton Park, on the 
5th of April, 1870, aged 67. Throughout the winter he had been an 
invalid, but on Saturday before his death he was so well that he ventured 
upon a drive to Alnwick. In waiting for his carriage to return home he 
was seized with paralysis, and on being conveyed to Felton Park, under the 
anxious care of Mrs. Riddell and a medical attendant, he never regained 
consciousness, and gradually sank down to death. For many years Mr. 
Riddell's constitution had been giving way; and in public life he had 
taken little interest. Domesticated within the beautiful demesnes of Fel- 
ton Park, his habits were simple and unostentatious. As a landlord, Mr. 
Riddell was popular; his word was his bond, and his attachments strong 
to the memories of generations upon his extensive estates. Sensible of 
the dignity of family traditions, he sustained with admirable consistency 
the best traits of a country gentleman. In proof of the unlimited confi- 
dence in Mr. Riddell's honor, it may be stated that occupancy upon his 
estates had existed for upwards of thirty-eight years without the evidence 



y 




r RE V D WIL1 ID. 



SIDDELLS OF SWINBURNE AND FELTON. 147 



of ink. Few men have passed away with deeper feelings of gratitude, 
affection, and regret, on the part of those who mourned his loss as a land- 
lord, a neighbor, and a friend to the poor. His mortal remains were 
committed to their last resting-place in the family vault, at St. Mary's 
Catholic Church, Felton Park. The chief mourners were John-Giffard 
Riddell, Esq., Felton Park; Robert Riddell, Esq., Edward-Widdrington 
Riddell, Esq., York; Henry-Matthias Riddell, Esq., London; Edward Rid- 
dell, Esq., Cheeseburn Grange; John Errington, Esq., High Warden, the 
deceased's son-in-law ; Sir Humphrey de Trafford, and Mr. Augustus de 
Trafford, of Trafford Hall. 

[N. B. Mr. Errington of High Warden, who died in 1878, left his 
third wife, nee Riddell of Felton Park, a widow, and also a son and daugh- 
ter by her.] 

Edward- Widdriiigton Riddell 20 (4), second son of Ralph 19 (4), was 
born in 1803 ; married July 1, 1830, Catherine, eldest daughter of 
Thomas Stapleton, Esq., of Carlton Hall and of the Grove, Richmond, 
County of York, and a sister of Miles-Thomas, eighth Lord Beaumont, 
father of the present baron, Henry Stapleton, by whom he had issue three 
sons and three daughters. Mr. Riddell was an officer in the Eighteenth 
Hussars, and became distinguished. He died. in 1870. I think Mr. Rid- 
dell resided at Felton Park. 

Right Rev. William Riddell- (12), third son of Ralph 19 (4), was 
born Feb. 5, 1807. He was endowed with superior intellectual faculties, 
and was early the subject of deep religious convictions. Having decided 
to devote himself to the work of the priesthood in the Catholic Church, 
of which this family have ever been supporters, he received his first les- 
sons of knowledge and science in a celebrated house known as " Stony- 
hurst," from the Jesuit fathers sojourning there; and having finished his 
college course, he made a visit to Rome, where he entered holy orders, 
and was called to a most honorable and responsible office under Cardinal 
Wells. Then came a change in his vocation. In the autumn of 1833, he 
was stationed as priest at Newcastle-on-Tyne, and labored there till 1844, 
among the poorest classes of that great city, "always ready to receive the 
penitent sinner in the holy tribunal of penance, to counsel those who came 
to seek counsel, to encourage those who required to be reminded that, 
however great the guilt and ingratitude of man. the mercy of God is in- 
finite as His infinite being, and can never be restricted by human infirm- 
ity." He was careful in teaching the flock he presided over those truths 
they should know, and the sacred duties required of them. He was es- 
pecially devoted to the young, and spent much of his time in giving them 
instruction. The paramount interest of his ministry seemed to be, while 
in Newcastle, the founding of schools of an efficient character. He was 
ever ready to assist his poor brethren, and glad to part with anything in 
his possession in the shape of wealth, that he might be a faithful steward 
to the needy. In March, 1844, he was raised to the episcopal office of 
bishop, having been appointed by Pope Gregory XVI, coadjutor to the 
Right Rev. Dr. Mostyne, Vicar Apostolic of the Northern District. The 
new prelate, who was styled " Bishop of Lango," in partibus infidelium, 
was consecrated at Ushaw, with great pomp by the bishops in attendance. 
On the death of Dr. Mostyne, in 1847, Dr. Riddell became sole bishop of 
his district, continuing to discharge the duties of his high office with great 
application and acceptability. He did not confine his labors to Newcas- 
tle, but erected a church at Felling, almost exclusively by his personal 



148 RIDDELLS OF SWINBUBNE AND FELTOX. 

efforts and private generosity. He performed the pontifical high mass at 
the opening of St. Mary's Cathedral Church in Newcastle, when nine 
bishops were present. During the time when a dreadfully fatal contagion 
was sweeping the city, and several priests had died, Dr. Riddell went 
forth into the lanes and alleys among the poor, and in the last week in 
October he was stricken with the disease, which carried him away on the 
2d of November. When he knew his hour had come, he carefully put his 
house in order, outwardly and within his own heart. He said, "I am 
ready to live if I am to be longer useful for the glory of God, but I am 
ready to die if so be His will." To a friend who had besought him earn- 
estly to avoid exposing himself to the mortal disorder, he said, "My 
friend, you gave me the counsel not to expose myself ; I have done so, and 
God has stricken me; if I have done wrong, I beg thy pardon." On the 
8th of November his remains were conveyed from his residence in Char- 
lotte Square to the church in West Clayton, the procession being con- 
ducted with great ceremony. The body lay in state during the night, 
and on the following day the burial was performed, mass being said by 
Bishop Wiseman, assisted by Bishop Briggs, Bishop Gillies, Bishop Ware- 
ing, and numerous clergymen of inferior rank. Dr. Riddell was greatly 
and deservedly esteemed by all denominations in the city of Newcastle, 
and an immense concourse of the general public were present at his fu- 
neral. A half-length portrait of him, in his pontifical robes, drawn on 
stone by Miss Errington, was published soon after his death, by Andrew 
Reid, lithographer, Pilgrim Street, Newcastle-on-Tyne. 

Henry-Matthias Riddell 20 (1), fourth son of Ralph 19 (4), was born 
Feb. 24, 1815, and is a barrister-atdaw in the city of London. Presum- 
ably a single man. 

Charles-Fraiicis Riddell 20 (1), fifth son of Ralph 19 (4), was born 
Oct. 1, 1817. No other information of this man. 

Elizabeth-Aline Riddell" (4), eldest daughter of Ralph 19 (-4). 

Juliana Riddell- (1), second daughter of Ralph 19 (4). 

Frances Riddell" (1), third daughter of Ralph 19 (4). 

Louisa Riddell-' (1), fourth daughter of Ralph 19 (4). 

TWENTY-FIRST GENERATION. 

Thoinas-William-Chas. Riddell 21 (17), eldest son of Thomas 20 (16), 
was born Oct. 14, 1828 ; married May 3, 1855, Lady Henrietta, second 
daughter of Arthur James, Earl of Fingall, K. P. He died at Barcelona, 
Spain, May 24, 1867, leaving no issue male, and the representation of 
the family devolved upon his brother, of whom hereafter. 

John-Giffard Riddell" 1 (4), second son of Thomas- (1(>), was born 
Jan. 10, 1830 ; married in 1854 Madamoiselle Sopelier, who, dying in 
1865, he married secondly, Victoria-Henrietta, fifth daughter of Peter 
Purcel, Esq., of Haverston, County Kildare. Mr. Riddell was educated 
at Oscott College, and is a magistrate for Northumberland. He succeeded 
his father in 1870, at Felton Park and Swinburne Castle, and has kindly 
furnished photograph views of these elegant residences, from which the 
plates in this book were made. Several children in this family, of whom 
hereafter. 

Walter Riddell' 1 (2), third son of Thomas (16), 20 was born July 17, 
1831, and was drowned at Waiira, in Hawks Bay, New Zealand, when 
crossing a creek. 

Robert Riddell' 1 (4), fourth son of Thomas (16), 20 was born Aug. '24, 



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RID DELLS OF CHEESEBURN GRANGE. 149 

1832, and was living at the time of his father's death, in 1870; but I have 
no particulars. 

Edward Riddell 21 (5), fifth son of Thomas 20 (16), was born in January, 
1836. Presumably living in 1870, as a Riddell of this name was one of 
the chief mourners at the death of this Edward's father; but I have no 
knowledge of him. 

Frances-Mary Riddell 21 (1), eldest daughter of Thomas 20 (16), was 
born in 1838; was married Jan. 29, 1866, to John O'Shaughnessey, Esq., 
of Birch Grove, County Roscommon, Ireland, and had a daughter, who 
became a nun of St. Dominic. 

Gertrude-Mary Riddell 21 (1), seconddaughter of Thomas 20 (16), was 
born in 1840; was married in 1863 toJohn Errington, Esq., of High 
Warden, County Northumberland. 

Teresa-Elizabeth Riddell 21 (1), third daughter of Thomas 20 (16), was 
married to Thomas Metcalf, Esq., of Bath, by whom she had, besides a 
daughter, Maria-Teresa, a son, Thomas-Peter, who assumed, by sign man- 
ual, the surname and arms of Moore only, in compliance with the will of 
his paternal grandmother, who was heiress and last lineal descendant in 
the direct line of the illustrious Lord High Chancellor, Sir Thomas More. 
[One authority states that there was another daughter of Thomas Riddell, 
named Laura-Elizabeth, who died in 1858, at Longborough, St. Mary's 
Convent.] 

Rev. Edward-Widdrington Riddell 21 (6), eldest son of Edward 20 (4), 
was born May 10, 1831, and is in holy orders of the Roman Catholic 
Church. His seat is Bootham House, Yorkshire. 

John-Gerard Riddell 21 (5), second son of Edward 20 (4), was born 
August 8, 1835 ; married in 1863, Catherine-Flora, youngest daughter of 
Edward Chaloner, Esq., of Oak Hill, near Liverpool, and is styled "of 
Hermiston Grange, Nottinghamshire, England." He has issue, of whom 
hereafter. 

Arthur-George Riddell 21 (1), third son of Edward 20 (4), was born 
Sc-pt. 15, 1836. 

Laura-Monica Riddell 21 (1), only daughter of Edward 20 (4). 

TWENTY-SECOND GENERATION. 

Louisa-M.-Josephine Riddell 22 (1), only daughter of Thomas 21 (17), 
was born April 15, 1864. 

Cuthbert-David-Giffard Riddell 22 (1), eldest son of John 21 (4), of 
Felton Park, was born in 1868. 

Laura Riddell 22 (2), a daughter of John 21 (4), of Felton Park, was 
born in 1870. 



Edward-Charles Riddell 22 (7), eldest son of John 21 (5), of Hermiston 
Grange, was born in 1867. 



RIDDELLS OF CHEESEBURN GRANGE. 

[Eighteenth Generation from Sir Jordan.] 

Ralph Riddell 18 (2), son of Thomas 17 (18), of Felton Park (see 
" Riddells of Swinburne and Felton"), was born in 1774; married May 9, 
1803, Isabella, daughter of William Salvin, Esq., of Croxdale Hall, County 



150 EIDDLES OF TROUGHEND, ENGLAND. 

of Durham (she was a widow of his cousin, Edward Riddell, of Felton 
Park), and was the inheritor of the estates of his uncle, Ralph Widdring- 
ton, Esq., at Cheeseburn Grange. He died in 1831 (his widow in 1853), 
having had issue five sons and one daughter. 

NINETEENTH GENERATION. 

Robert Riddell 19 (5), eldest son of Ralph" (2), died in 1826. 
William Riddell 1 ' (13), second son of Ralph ls (2), died in 1828. 
Edward Riddell 19 (8), third son of Ralph" (2), was born in 1804, and 
succeeded his father as proprietor of Cheeseburn Grange, in 1831. He 

was educated at Ushaw College. Married June 16, 1866, Adelia-Maria, 
third daughter of S. T. Scrope, Esq., of Danby Hall, Yorkshire. He was 
a Justice of the Peace, and Doctor of Law for Northumberland; was Sher- 
iff in 1842. Mr. Riddell died in 1871, without issue, and was succeeded 
by his brother, of whom hereafter. 

"Frederick Riddell 19 (1), fourth son of Ralph 18 (2), was born in 1808, 
and designated " of Levburn Grove, County of York." He died in 1866, 
and was succeeded by his brother. 

Francis Riddell 19 (1), only surviving son of Ralph 17 (13), born in 1813; 
married in 1862, Ellen, daughter of Michael Blount, Esq.. of Maple Dur- 
ham, Oxon, and succeeded his brother in 1871. Has a son Edward, and 
probably other issue. Mr. Riddell is a magistrate for County York and 
Northumberland. Residences, Cheeseburn Grange and Thornburgh House. 



RIDDLES OF TROUGHEND, ENGLAND. 

Edward Riddle 1 (1), supposed to have been descended from some an- 
cient branch of the Northumberland Riddells, lived on a farm at Trough- 
end, in that county, and raised a family of children, of whom hereafter. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Robert Riddle'' (1), eldest son of Edward 1 (1), was born on a farm at 
Troughend, England, and died young, without family. 

Nicholas Riddle" (1), second son of Edward 1 (1), was born at Trough- 
end, England, and had a family of children. 

John Riddle" (1), third son of Edward 1 (1), was born at Troughend, 
England ; was hind (hired man) to his brother Edward as long as he 
lived. Had a family, of whom hereafter. 

Edward Riddle" (2), fourth son of Edward 1 (1). was born at Trough- 
end, England, and had a family. He was a fanner. 

Ann Riddle" (1), only daughter of Edward 1 (1), was born at Trough- 
end, England. No particulars. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Prof. Edward Riddle' (3), •< son of John 2 (1), was born at Troughend, 

England, in 1788 ; married, and had i<sue six children, of whom hereafter. 
Mr. Riddle first kept school at Otterburn, or Reedwater, a village not less 
interesting for its romantic situation than from its historical associations ; 
there he became acquainted with Mr. James Thompson, a person well 



RIDDLES OF TROUUliEND, ENGLAND. 151 



known in those parts for upwards of half a century, and who was remark- 
able for his knowledge of many branches of science, as well as for consid- 
erable attainments in mathematics. It is not improbable that Mr. Riddle 
derived from him that taste for the science which clung to his mind with 
such tenacity to the end of his life. What renders this more likely is, 
that about the time, before he was twenty years of age, he made an 
electrical machine with his own hands, and with it showed the ordinary 
phenomena produced by that instrument. At that period, it is easily im- 
agined with what wonder and alarm a ring of rustics would feel the 
electric impulse sent through their bodies, with a sensation unknown 

before. 

" Aud still they gazed, aud still the wonder grew, 
That one small head should carry all he knew." 

From Otterburn Mr. Riddle moved to Whitburn, in the County of 
Durham, and while there, in 1810, his name first appeared in the Ladies' 
Diary, then under the editorship of Dr. Hutton, whose friend he sub- 
sequently became, and who rendered him such important assistance in 
advancing his success in life. It then appears that at the age of twenty- 
two he had made great progress in mathematical studies. For many 
years he continued to be a distinguished contributor to the Ladies' Diary, 
in which his solutions were always remarkable for beauty and accuracy. 
He has said that the complete mastery of Playfair's Encylopasdia, which 
he accomplished, produced such an effect on his mind, as to render the 
acquisition of any other mathematical subject easy. After continuing 
seven years at Whitburn, Mr. Riddle, through the recommendation of Dr. 
Hutton, was appointed master of the Trinity House School, Newcastle-on- 
Tyne, in which he remained seven years, proving by his energies and ability 
of the greatest service to the nautical education of the port, which had 
previously been in the lowest possible state. In 1821, while master of 
the Trinity House School, Mr. Riddle made an extensive series of observa- 
tions to ascertain the longtitude of that school, and to determine by actual 
expeiuments what confidence may now be placed in the results of lunar 
observations ; these observations are given in a table in his remarks on 
the present state of nautical astronomy, published in 1821, and dedicated 
to the Master and Brethren of Trinity House, Newcastle-on-Tyne. This 
essay is admirably written, and proves that he was as able to become the 
historian of science as to extend her boundaries. In 1821, by the same 
powerful influence of Dr. Hutton, he was appointed Master of the Upper 
School, Royal Naval Asylum, Greenwich, where he remained till the period 
of his retirement in 1851. Soon after his removal to London he became 
a member of the Royal Astronomical Society, to which he contributed 
several valuable papers. Mr. Riddle was one of the council of that learned 
body, and took an active part in all its plans for the advancement of 
science. In the third volume of the Transactions of the Society thei'e is 
an able paper by him, " On Finding the Rates of Time-keepers," in which 
he showed how it could be done without a transit instrument. To 
amateur astronomers, and to sea-faring men not having access to such an 
instrument, his method was valuable. In the twelfth volume of the same 
transactions appears another of his papers, " On Longitude of Madras, by 
Moon-culminating Observations," which is very elaborate, and contains 
valuable directions and remarks. The most valuable work which ever 
came from Mr. Riddle's pen is his " Treatise on Navigation and Nautical 
Astronomy" ; — it was an immense improvement on the empirical com- 



152 BIDDELLS OF TltOUGHEND. ENGLAND. 

pendium in vogue when it appeared, combining, as it did, practice and 
theory in luminous order. It forms a course of mathematics for the 
nautical men, containing as much algebra and geometry as is necessary for 
the demonstrations of the various problems which it comprehends. It is 
a text-book in the Royal Navy. Mr. Riddle was noted for the surprising 
quickness and accuracy with which he took celestial observations. Shortly 
after his retirement in 1851, his bust in marble was presented to him by 
his old pupils, officers in the Royal Navy, accompanied with the expression 
of their high esteem for his worth as a public and private man. The pre- 
sentation was in the boys' department of Greenwich School, the Admiral 
(Sir C. Adams) and all the officers attending in full uniform. These 
were deserving honors for a long, useful, and honorable life. He retired 
on full salary. Succeeded by his son. He died in 1856, aged 68 years. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Jane Riddle 4 (1), eldest daughter of Edward 3 (3), was married in 1844, 
to Captain Petlev, Royal Navy. Has issue. 

Prof. John Riddle 4 (2), 'eldest son of Edward 3 (3), was born at 
Newcastle-on-Tyne, England, in November, 1816 ; married Georgiana 
MacKenzie, daughter of Eneas MacKenzie of Newcastle-on-Tyne, the 
Northumberland historian, and had issue seven children, of whom here- 
after. At the early age of fifteen Mr. Riddle was appointed an assistant 
master in the Greenwich Hospital Schools, and on the retirement of liis 
father in 1851, was chosen to succeed him as head master. In 1846, he 
was elected a Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society, and from that 
time till his death, was a regular attendant at its meetings, and an 
occasional contributor to its papers. He was appointed in 1854 Examiner 
in Navigation to the Science and Art department of the Committee of 
Council on Education, and held for many years a similar appointment in 
the Society of Arts. By both these Institutions his services wei'e highly 
valued. As a teacher Mr. John Riddle was perhaps unrivalled, and his 
success in instilling into the minds of mere boys not only the practice, 
but the theory of navigation was very remarkable. The influence he 
possessed with his pupils was unbounded ; and the good which he has 
accomplished, by stamping on a vast number of the scientific officers of the 
Royal Navy the impress of his own vigorous mind, was so great that his 
untimely death, which occurred Oct. 11, 1862, was looked upon as no other 
than a national loss. 

Mr. Riddle was not only a good mathematician and a successful teacher, 
but also an accomplished gentleman, with a great taste for poetry and the 
arts. In society he was a universal favorite; and his urbane manner and 
intellectual conversation will long be remembered by a large circle of 
sorrowing friends. 

His death was the result of a fall from a platform in his class room, which 
produced concussion of the brain, from which, after lingering sixteen days, 
he expired. The following is on a monument to his memory. 

To 

the memory of 

John Riddle, Esq.. /•'.'/.'. A. S., 

late Head Muster of the 

Nautical School, 

who died 1 lth of Oct.. 1862, 

in the. 46th year of his age, 

from injury to the brain, caused by 

an accident in his class room. 



RIDDLES OF TWEED MOUTH, ENGLAND. 153 

This tablet 

is erected by his colleagues, 

The Masters of the Boyal Hospital Schools, 

In testimony of 

their high appreciation of his 

public services as a teacher, 

and the 

uprightness and purity of his character, 

as exhibited in all the relations of life. 

Mary Kiddle 4 (1), second daughter of Edward 3 (3), was born March 

1, 1818, and died March 19, 1823. 

Margaret Riddle 4 (1), third daughter of Edward 3 (3), was born Sept. 
26, 1819, and died March 15, 1839. 

Eliza Riddle 4 (1), fourth daughter of Edward 3 (3), was married to 
Rev. George-Yates Boddy, Vicar of Colgate, near to Horsham, late Pro- 
fessor at the Royal Millitary Academy, Woolwich, and has issue. 

William Riddle 4 (1), youngest son of Edward 3 (3), was born Nov. 

2, 1824, and died Dec. 26, 1825. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

Elizabeth Riddle 5 (1), eldest daughter of John 4 (2). 

Edward Riddle 5 (4), eldest son of John 4 (2), married Charlotte-Jane, 
only daughter of Ralph- William Lucas, an old Waterloo veteran, and has 
issue, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddle is an engineer of submarine tele- 
graphy, and has been employed on almost all the great lines. He is a 
member of the Society of Telegraph Engineers. 

Margaret-Katherhie Riddle 5 (2), second daughter of John 4 (2), was 
married to Thomas Connorton, Esq., of Reigate, Surrey. 

Jollll-CJeorge Riddle 5 (3), second son of John 4 (2), was born in 1849, 
and died when an infant. 

Katherine-Mary Riddle 5 (1), third daughter of John 4 (2), was married 
to Frank Lucas, Esq., of Blackheath. 

Georgiaiia-Frances Riddle 5 (1), fourth daughter of John 4 (2), was 
born in 1853, and died an infant. 

Marian-Matilda Riddle 6 (1), fifth daughter of John 4 (2). 

Heleii-MacKenzie Riddle 5 (1), sixth daughter of John 4 (2). 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

Dorothy-Margaret Riddle 6 (1), eldest daughter of Edward 5 (4), 
born 1874. 

John Riddle 6 (4), eldest son of Edward 5 (4), born in 1877. 
Willett-Lncas Riddle 6 (1), second son of Edward 5 (4), died an infant. 
Infant Son of Edward 5 (4), name not known. 



RIDDLES OF TWEEDMOUTH, ENGLAND. 

Samuel Riddle 2 (1), was descended from an old Northumberland fam- 
ily long settled at Twizell-on-Tweed, and presumably an offshoot from 
some branch of the Riddells of ISTewcastle-on-Tyne, or Gateshead, and re- 
lated to the Riddles of Troughend. He and his father were flour mil- 
lers at Twizell mill, and both are buried in Norham church-yard. Mr. 



154 BID DELLS OF I'ARKMOVNT, IRELAND, 

Riddle, father of Samuel, was twice married and had several sons and 
daughters. The son married Elizabeth Aitchison, and left four sons and 
two daughters, of whom hereafter. He carried on business at Tweed- 
mouth as millwright and engineer ; died in his 90th year, and was buried 
at Tweedmouth. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Peter Riddle 3 (1), son of Samuel- (1), and succeeded his father at 
Tweedmouth as millwright and engineer. 

James Riddle 3 (1), a son of Samuel 2 (1). 

Samuel Riddle 3 (2), a son of Samuel 2 (1). 

Andrew Riddle 3 (1), a son of Samuel 2 (1), was born about 1809; 
married Mary-Ann Steel, and has seven children, of whom hereafter. He 
is a millwright and engineer. Residence, Tweedmouth, England. 

Beatrice Riddle 3 (1), daughter of Samuel 2 (1), born at Twizell, Eng- 
land. Deceased. 

Mary Riddle 3 (1), daughter of Samuel 2 (1), was born at Twizell, 
England. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Samnel-Pllilin Riddle 4 (3), eldest son of Andrew 3 (1), is a mill 
wright and engineer at Tweedmouth. 

George-Steel Riddle 4 (1), second son of Andrew 3 (1), is a millwright 
and engineer at Tweedmouth. 

Andrew Riddle 4 (2), third son of Andrew 3 (1), was born in October, 
1851, and resides at Yeavering; is the occupier of Yeavering and Kirk- 
uewton farms, both in the parish of Kirknewton, and County of North- 
umberland, England. 

Isabella-Bothwiek Riddle 4 (1), eldest daughter of Andrew 3 (1), 
resides at Tweedmouth. 

John Riddle 4 (1), fourth son of Andrew 3 (1), millwright and engineer 
at Tweedmouth. 

Elizabeth-Aitchison Riddle 4 (1), second daughter of Andrew 3 (1), 
resides at Tweedmouth. 

Mary-Ann Riddle 4 (2), third daughter of Andrew 3 (1), resides at 
Tweedmouth. 



RIDDELLS OF PARKMOUNT, IRELAND. 

[United States Branch.] 

James Riddell 1 (1), parents unknown, was born somewhere in the 
Lowlands of Scotland ; became a commissioned officer in the army of 
William III, and being an uncompromising Presbyterian, fought from 
principle during the wars with the Catholic-Irish. He was probably 
at the battle of Boyne-water,* and possibly connected with the siege of 
Londonderry. He was rewarded for his services in the army by a grant 

* Boyne-water, or river, in the east of Ireland, rises in the Bog of Allan, and 
Hows through Kildare, Kings County, Meath, and Louth. The Battle of Boyne 
took place on the banks of Boyne-water, near Oldridge, on the 1st of July, 1690, 
in which William III defeated James II. An obelisk, 150 feet high, marks the scene 
of the battle. 



RIDDELLS OF VARKMOUNT, IRELAND. 155 

of three townlands in the County of Armagh, in the North of Ireland, 
and subsequently went there to dwell. He is said to have married Janet 
Maxwell, a woman of Scottish descent, and by her had issue, a family of 
sons and daughters. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

James Riddell 2 (2), a son of James 1 (1), was born in the County of 
Armagh, Ireland, about 1670-80 ; married Mary Henderson, of Scotch 
parentage, and continued this branch family, being his father's heir. He 
was a man of wealth and position, and of powerful physical strength. 
He lived to an advanced age, and died leaving three children, of whom 
hereafter. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

James Riddell 3 (3), a son of James 2 (2), was born in the city of Bel- 
fast (the author thinks a few miles out of the city proper), Ireland, in 
1746; married Elizabeth Cowden, and had issue three sons, of whom 
hereafter. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Leander Riddle 4 (1), son of James 3 (3), was born in Belfast, County 
Antrim, Ireland, in 1766; married Mary Brooks, and had issue several 
children, of whom hereafter. He was in the British naval service for 
four years ; subsequently a cotton manufacturer. Emigrated to the 
United States, and settled in Pennsylvania in 1827, where he died in Sep- 
tember, 1851, aged 85 years. 

James Riddle 4 (4), a son of James 3 (3), was born at (or near) Bel- 
fast, Ireland, and became ancestor of the Riddells of Belfast, which 
see. He was a half-brother of Leander. 

Alexander Riddle 4 (1), a son of James 3 (3), Avas born near Belfast, 
Ireland, and never married. He is said to have been a man of herculean 
strength, and feats accomplished by him were remarkable. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

Elizabeth Riddle 5 (1), eldest daughter of Leander 4 (1), was born at 
Parkmount, near Belfast, Ireland, in 1798, and is now living at Glen-Rid- 
dle, Perm. 

Samuel Riddle 5 (1), eldest son of Leander 4 (1), was born at Park- 
mount, near Belfast, Ireland, in 1800. He married for his first wife, Mar- 
tha Mercer, and secondly, Lydia C. Doyle, of Chester, Penn., by whom 
he has issue four children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddle acquired a 
fair English education at a private academy, quitting it at an early age to 
enter a cotton-factory in Belfast. While at the latter place he acquired 
a practical knowledge of cotton-manufacturing, being thus occupied nine 
years. He then determined to seek a more profitable field, and in May, 
1823, sailed for the United States, but was shipwrecked at Sable Island. 
He eventually reached Philadelphia, in the following August, his whole 
capital being now reduced to five Spanish dollars. He carried his sea- 
chest on his back to his boarding-house, and immediately obtained em- 
ployment in a cotton-mill at Manayunk. He removed to Pleasant Mills, 
N. J., where he was employed about three years. During this time, by 
carefulness and thrift, he had accumulated a small amount of means, with 
which he commenced business on his own account. He rented a mill at 
Springdale, Delaware County, Penn., in 1827, and engaged in spinning cot- 
ton yarns with four hundred and eighty mule spindles, employing only ten 



156 R1DDELLS OF PABKMOUNT, IRELAND. 

hands. In three years' time he removed to a larger building on Chester 
Creek, and commenced operations with three hundred mule spindles, and the 
necessary machinery used in preparation ; he remained there prosperously 
engaged for twelve years. In 1842 he purchased property at Pennsgrove, 
in Delaware County, which he named "Glen-Riddle," for Glen-Riddell, the 
residence of a branch of the family in Scotland. This locality was well 
chosen ; a beautiful valley on Chester Creek, about fifteen miles from Phil- 
adelphia, was the place suited to Mr. Riddle's mind, and here he has added 
acre to acre and mill to mill, until at present the estate consists of a tract 
of land of several hundred acres, worth about three hundred dollars per 
acre. There are five large mills and more than two hundred dwellings in 
the town, occupied principally by the mill-operatives, of whom there are 
about live hundred employed. The town, a post-office, and railway-sta- 
tion derive their name from their projector, Mr. Riddle. The mills ope- 
rate nearly ten thousand four hundred cotton and woolen spindles, with 
all the machinery for the preparatory work, and two hundred and seventy 
power looms ; these are driven by two water-wheels and a powerful Cor- 
liss engine. Here Mr. Riddle has prosecuted his business for more than 
thirty years, with constantly increasing prosperity, as the demand for his 
manufactures augments every year. Mr. Riddle's personal appearance is 
very marked ; he is short, quite corpulent, and carries an expression of 
great determination in his face. In conversation he is very jocose and 
sarcastic ; has a great fund of anecdotes, and can relate them in a pecul- 
iarly interesting way. He is fully engaged in his business operations, 
conducting the vai'ious branches with great system and carefulness. He 
has admitted other members of the family, and the business is now car- 
ried on under the firm-name of Samuel Riddle, Son & Co. In addition 
to the business carried on at Glen-Riddle, they have a large business as 
commission merchants in Philadelphia. 

[The author was the guest of Samuel Riddle for a few days after the 
family meeting held in Philadelphia, in 1876, and will ever remember with 
the most pleasing emotions the hours passed in this beautiful village; ev- 
ery attention was bestowed by this hospitable family which could conduce 
to the enjoyment of my visit. On the 4th of July, Mr. Riddle's son, in com- 
pany with the mother and little Maude, the youngest daughter, took me on 
a pleasant drive with a fine barouche drawn by a pair of noble horses; the 
route lay through a very rich farming district, and the prospect from some 
of the grand hills over which we made our way was extensive and pic- 
turesque ; and the cherries that were gathered from the large trees by 
the roadside were delicious to the taste. Glen-Riddle was appropriately 
named. Beautiful hills surround the village on every side, and nestling 
at their base, embowered in groves of luxuriant hard-wood trees that 
grow along the margin of the creek, stand the mills, and neat, white 
dwellings, where home the families employed by Mr. Riddle. Directly in 
front of the mansion-house of Mr. Riddle rises a large hill, the surface in 
smooth pastures, except near the summit, where we reach the borders of 
a beautiful grove of wide-spreading trees, a cool and delightful resting- 
place in a summer day. The family residence is surrounded with parks 
and gardens, tastefully laid out and ornamented with a variety of plants 
and -flowers; there are fountains pouring forth their sparkling waters 
upon the grassy banks along the garden avenues, and all overshadowed 
with the foliage of the wide-spreading trees that everywhere abound. 
The house, constructed of solid stone, is spacious and stately, situated on 





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RIDDELLS OF PARKMOUNT, IRELAND. 157 

a lot somewhat elevated from the parallel street, and when built was con- 
sidered the most elegant country-house in that county. Nothing that a 
cultivated taste could suggest, or money secure, seems to have been over- 
looked in the arrangement and furniture of the interior of the Riddle 
mansion; the rooms are large and cool, the furnishing rich, and the por- 
traits and landscapes in oil, upon the walls, are valuable and artistic. In 
front, over the main entrance, is a fine portico, provided with seats and 
large rustic chairs; here, in the evening, w r e gathered with the Riddle fam- 
ily, and in pleasant conversation touching our family history we passed 
genial hours; Mr. Riddle occasionally weaving in a story relating to 
the adventures of his ancestors in the old country. The village is sur- 
rounded by extensive farms owned by the proprietor, and the acres of ri- 
pened grain and luxuriant corn, that were standing upon the field, showed 
the high state of fertility to which these lands have been raised. Large 
droves of sleek cows go slowly to the hillside pastures in the early morn- 
ing, and noble horses graze along the fields. In company with the pro- 
prietor we walked about the village and along the willow-shaded streets, 
having our attention called to many objects of improvement and interest 
at every turn.] 

The following lines are taken from a poem on Glen-Riddle, composed 
by a lady who taught the village school: — 



But whence earnest thou, fair Riddle Glex, 

Peopled by noble, active men ? 

Dost thou from Scott's Ryedale of old, 

Bear a sheaf of rye on thy armor bold ? 

Or dost thou Ireland's ancestry claim, 

For him who gave thine ancient name ? 

But all the same, thou canst contend 

With Scotland's or old Ireland's glen. 

But where wast thou when Doleraine 

Passed through ' Ancient Riddell's Fair Domain,' 

To seek the monk of St. Mary's Isle, 

In Melrose Abbey's most holy pile? 

Thou still wert here, as on creation's morn, 

Uncultivated, nameless, thy power unborn. 

But 't was thy fate in solitude to dwell, 

Till on thy beauties the eyes of Riddle fell. 

Long years ago, on our own loved shore, 

A Riddle stood, one pound his coffer bore, 

But with his own keen native wit imbued, 

America, land of the free, he viewed. 

He wandered o'er the country far and wide, 

Until he stood a gentle stream beside, 

And meditative watched its onward flow, 

His soul with new-born thoughts aglow, 

And in imagination saw an ideal Glen 

Where his free fancy painted living men; 

He invested — and his one pound grew 

To one pound more, then treble two. 

Oh ! Perseverance, thou motto grand, 

That reared this Glen in our lovely land ; 

Linked to Scotland's heraldry of old, 

Its builder from the same ancestral fold, 

Esteemed of noble heart and kiud, 

Of progressive and persevering mind. 

How often with the ever-busy throng 

Beneath the willow's shade I 've moved along ; 

And by the Riddle Mansion wend my way, 

Under whose shade the Riddle children play. 



L58 EIDDELLS OF VABKMOUNT, IRELAND. 

" Young Samuel, bent on his boyhood fan, 
As full of mischief as an}' other one ; 
But though he 's a merry and active lad, 
And acts the rogue, we '11 not deem him bad. 
And there is Maude, with eyes so bright, 
As sparkling ih the stars of night; 
And Lottie too, we now must not forget, 
For she 's a winsome, cunning little pet. 
Then comes wee Willie, who is. I ween, 
As full as any Riddle, of vigor keen. 
And now we leave them in their childhood sport, 
For life's bright morn is at longest short. 
Standing where a beautiful stream is spanned 
By a rustic bridge-way'- steady hand: 
Oh, this is a beautiful spot indeed, 
Xo better view in all Glen-Riddle mead. 
There I loved to go on a pleasant day. 
And watch the sparkling silvery spray ; 
Or wander forth by the pale moonlight, 
And gaze on the water's surface bright, 
Where it gracefully leaps in a mimic fall, 
Like old Niagara, but not quite as tall. 
This same old stream that many years ago 
Pursued its quiet way. its gentle flow, 
And so continued as of old, until 
A Riddle's mind conceived 'twould turn a mill ; 
And now it lends its aid to lessen toil. 
And scatter blessings o'er Glex-Riddi.i.'s soil." 

Rev. James Riddle 5 (-t), second son of Leander 4 (1), was born at 
Parkmount, near the city of Belfast, Ireland, in 1803 ; married Hannah 
Nibloek, a lady of Quaker parentage, and had issue several children, of 
whom hereafter. After learning to manufacture cotton goods, he emi- 
grated to the United States, and commenced work with his brother 
Samuel, at Pleasant Mills, Gloucester County, N. J. He afterwards 
became manager of these mills, but subsequently entered into partnership 
with his brother at Springfield, Delaware County, Penn., where their 
success was so apparent that another mill was erected for them on Ches- 
ter Creek, in the same county. This mill was named "Parkmount," after 
the residence of the Riddells in Ireland. The brothers continued the 
business at the latter place about eight years, dissolving partnership at 
the end of that time. James, in company with a Mr. Lawrence, rented a 
mill on Cruni Creek, Avondale. Here Mr. Riddle took up his residence. 
He was connected with manufacturing operations at Chester and Rose- 
ville, at the same time. In 1844 he purchased the old "Gilpin estates," 
on the river Brandywine, near Wilmington, Del., where he continued his 
connections with Mr. Lawrence until 1857, when he became sole proprie- 
tor. From these small beginnings the business grew to proportions of 
great magnitude. The property at the time of purchase comprised one 
hundred and thirty acres of land, two mansion houses, two cottages, and 
several tenement houses. Now, in the cotton-mills are running three 
hundred looms and eleven thousand spindles ; two hundred and fifty 
hands are employed, and two thousand bales of cotton used annually. 
The number of tenement houses has been increased to about one hundred, 
and besides the old " Kentmere Mansion," rises up the new and elegant 
residence of Mr. William Field, Mr. Riddle's son-in-law. Added to per- 
severance and business tact, his moral and religious principles rendered 
Mr. Riddle a very useful and influential citizen. Before leaving his 







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BID DELLS OF PABKMOUNT, IRELAND. 159 

native land he had been converted, and united with the Methodist church, 
and was a local preacher, speaking almost every Sabbath for several years. 
He has been heard to say he had two calls : one to preach the gospel, and 
the other to manufacture cotton goods ; and he was one of the few who 
proved successful in both. He occupied a very leading position among 
the local preachers of his denomination, and was president of their 
National Convention in 1864. Being a natural and forcible speaker, his 
pulpit and platform efforts were received with great favor. Not forget- 
ting in the tide of business the calls of duty, he provided well for the 
moral and religious welfare of his tenants Upon the brow of the hill, 
above the Brandy wine River, with its graceful spire rising above the trees, 
is the village chapel, erected by Mr. Riddle. It is of Gothic architecture, 
with stained-glass windows, and being located in a pleasant and imposing 
situation, becomes one of the most beautiful chapels in the state. For 
romantic scenery " Riddle's Banks," known in song as the " Banks of 
Brandywine," is unsurpassed, and the shady groves of ancient oaks upon 
the hill back of the chapel have been the resort for many years of social 
and picnic parties from the neighboring cities. Mr. Riddle was devoted 
to his adopted country, and during the dark hours of the late Rebellion, 
he was always ready to attest his devotion by word and deed. In 1866 
the Republican party made him their candidate for Governor of the State 
of Delaware ; in this election he was not the successful candidate, 
although, owing to his great popularity, he ran ahead of his ticket in 
every township in the state. 

His benevolence and kindly disposition were beyond question. He 
never received a kindness from others without fully reciprocating the 
same ; he was always a man of peace, and was not willing to speak 
harshly of any one. The fact that several of his men had been in his 
employ for upwards of thirty years, is a sufficient evidence of the amia- 
ble disposition which his refined Christian character enabled him to man- 
ifest in all his dealings with the world. The spare time of his youth was 
devoted to reading and religious exercises, and the large and valuable 
library left by him at his decease evinced the fact that his love for books 
continued through life. He was fond of society, and Mrs. Riddle always 
had her share of visitors. His death occurred Aug. 21, 1874, from heart 
disease. During his sickness he received every attention from his kind 
and dutiful family, and his last hours were peaceful and happy. His dis- 
order had for several years admonished him to prepare for death, and 
when the summons came he was found ready to depart and meet the 
Master he had so long loved and served. The funeral procession that 
followed his remains to their last resting-place was nearly two miles long, 
and the ceremonies in the church and at the grave were of a peculiarly 
impressive character, — an occasion not to be forgotten as a suitable 
tribute to a good man and respected citizen. In his will, Mr. Riddle left 
ten thousand dollars to the Church Extension Society, and five thou- 
sand dolhu-s to the Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
He also directed the formation of a fund for the education of young men 
for the ministry, with several other bequests of a similar nature, the total 
amount necessary to carry out the religious and charitable bequests being 
rising forty thousand dollars. 

" And I heard a voice from heaven, saying unto me, Write: Blessed are 
the dead which die in the Lord from henceforth: Yea, saith the Spirit, 
that they may rest from their labors, and their works do follow them.'''' 



160 HIDDELLS OF PA11KMOUNT, IRELAND. 

[The author culled at " Riddle's Ranks " when returning from a western 
tour in the summer of 1874, and was for a few hours the guest of Mr. 
Riddle; and the pleasant greetings received from, and kind attentions 
bestowed by, this estimable family will ever be cherished among the sunny 
memories of life. Weary with a long journey, and weak from a serious 
illness of only a few weeks previous, I was made to feel at home, and 
while there was the recipient of every comfort that could make my stay 
restful, and contribute to my happiness. Mr. Riddle was then in a pre- 
carious condition of health, but was able to ride about the village with 
me and point out his improvements and the beauties of the place. I 
found him a companionable man, genial and tender-hearted. In our con- 
versation concerning the history of his Scotch-Irish ancestors, lie informed 
me that his family had originally spelled their names "Riddell," which he 
recognized as the correct orthography, and presumed the change of spell- 
ing was made to accommodate the pronunciation, which, he said, was 
invariably Riddle, in Ireland. I was holding his hand at the gate on the 
morning of my departure, when Mr. Riddle expressed this sentiment : 
" I hope to live about ten years, and then go to dwell with Jesus." His 
wife was found a mild, amiable lady, very quiet and modest in appear- 
ance, and was a congenial companion for her husband — a noble and 
godly man. I little thought Mr. Riddle's stay with his affectionate family 
would be so short, for in about two weeks after my return to my pastorate 
in Massachusetts, I received intelligence of his death. A portrait of Mr. 
Riddle, contributed to this work by his family, is an excellent likeness. 
The view of the Riddle mansion is a good representation of the house, but 
would have been more pleasing if it had embraced more of the grounds.] 

Mary Riddle 5 (1), second daughter of Leander 4 (1), was born at 
Parkmount, near Relfast, Ireland, in 1805; was married to Alexander 
McDowell ; emigrated to the United States many years ago, and is now 
(1876) residing at Glen-Riddle, Delaware County, Penn. Her son, Mr. 
Samuel-Riddle McDowell, is connected in the business at Glen-Riddle, 
with his uncle. 

Jillie Riddle 5 (1), third daughter of Leander 4 (1), was born at Park- 
mount, near Relfast, Ireland, in 1807; was married to Hamilton Maxwell, 
a man of Scottish descent, and died in 1836. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

Henry Riddle 6 (1), eldest son of Samuel 5 (1),* was born in Philadel- 
phia, Penn., May 30, 1850; married Oct. 23, 1873, to Annie-M. Reatty, 
second daughter of John C. and Jemima Reatty, of Media, Penn. 

He has received an excellent literary education, besides a thorough 
training in the military and polytechnic schools. "When but eighteen 
years old he had the general charge of the factory at Glen-Riddle, and 
was admitted into the firm March 11, 1872. Mr. Riddle has made a tour 
through Europe, and visited some families of his father's relatives in the 
city of Relfast, Ireland. No issue in 1876. 

Samnel-Doyle Riddle (2), eldest son of Samuel 5 (1), by his second 
wife, was born at Glen-Riddle, July 1, 1861. 

Lvdia-Maude Riddle' 1 (1), eldest daughter of Samuel 5 (1), was born 
at Glen-Riddle, Dec. 1, 1862. 

♦There is a Samuel Riddle residing at Glen-Riddle, in some way connected with 
the above family, but I have not the genealogy. I was introduced to him at the 
Family Meeting. 



BIDDELLS OF BALLINAMAN, IRELAND. 161 

Charlotte-Bllffillgton Riddle (1), second daughter of Samuel 5 (1), 
was born at Glen-Riddle, Nov. 2, 1864. 

Leander- William Riddle (2),- third son of Samuel 5 (1), was born at 
Glen-Riddle, Penn., Oct. 25, 1868. 



Hannah Riddle (1), eldest daughter of James 5 (4), was born at 
Avondale, Penn., in 1840 ; died in 1844. 

Hon. Leander-F. Riddle 6 (3), only son of James 5 (4), was born at 
Avondale, Chester County, Penn., in 1842, and has been a member of 
the firm of James Riddle, Son & Company since 1865; since his father's 
death has been at the head of the firm. His father gave him every ad- 
vantage for an education, which, supplementing his great energy and 
determination of character, constitutes him an efficient and successful 
business man. He has informed himself on matters of polity, and was 
elected to the State Senate from Newcastle County, Del., in 1872, though 
scarcely thirty years old, with a large and complimentary majority, and 
was the only Republican member in the Senate at that session. He was 
secretary of Delaware State Commission at the centennial celebration at 
Philadelphia, in 1876, and transacted a great amount of business in that 
capacity. He presided at the family meeting of the Riddells, Riddles, 
and Ridlons, held at Philadelphia, in July, 1876, and has manifested an 
interest in this book. Mr. Riddle is considered one of the most promising 
young men in his state. 

Mary Riddle (2), second daughter of James 5 (4), was born (presum- 
ably) at Avondale, Chester County, Penn., in 1845, and died young. 

Jeannie Riddle (1), third daughter of James 5 (4), was born at 
Avondale (?), Penn. ; was married to William Field, and resides near 
the home of her parents, at Riddle's Banks, near the city of Wilmington, 
Del. Mrs. Field is a lady of brilliant and amiable natural endowments, 
supplemented by a fine education and graceful bearing. Unassuming and 
modest, commanding the purest language in conversation, she exerts a 
charming influence over those in her company. Her husband is a mem- 
ber of the firm of James Riddle, Son & Company, and an enterprising 
business man. The residence of Mrs. Field, a stately and beautiful house 
of modern architecture, is situated on an elevation, almost directly in 
front of the parental mansion, and commands one of the widest and 
most picturesque prospects to be found, and from the door the shining 
waters of Delaware Bay may be seen in the distance. The interior of the 
magnificent residence is fitted up with every modern improvement, and 
furnished with taste and splendor. 

Elizabeth Riddle (2), youngest daughter of James 5 (4), was born in 
1853, and died the same year.* 



RIDDELLS OF BALLINAMAN, IRELAND. 

James Riddell 1 (1), descended from ancestors said to have settled in 
Ireland in 1641 ; married, and had several sons and daughters. He lived 

* Mr. James Riddle, of this family, informed the author that he had not known a 
branch of his family in which the Christian names, James, John, Samuel, and 
George, did not prevail. He also called attention to the prominent cheek-bones 
characteristic in his connection. 

11 



162 BIDDELLS OF BALLINAMAN, IRELAND. 



in the parish of Donagh, near Glasslough, in the north of Ireland, and is 
presumed to have been connected with the other families of the name in 
the same county. (See " Riddles of Richhill.") 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Robert Riddell 2 (1), a sou of James 1 (1), was born in Ballinaraan, 
parish of Donagh, County Monaghan, in 1750; married twice, and had 
issue by both wives, of whom hereafter. He died in 1826, aged 76 years. 
He was a fanner and contractor. 

James Riddell 2 (2), a son of James 1 (1), was born in Ballinaman, 
County Monaghan, Ireland ; married an English lady, and had issue, of 
whom hereafter. Died in England. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

James Riddell 3 (3), eldest son of Robert' 2 (1), was born in Ballinaman, 
County Monaghan, Ireland, and died when in the prime of life, leaving 
four children, who, with their mother, emigrated to Canada about thirty 
years ago. Mrs. Riddell's maiden-name was Elizabeth Gilleland. She 
was left a widow in 1844, sold her farm in 1849, and emigrated to Canada, 
where her son James preceded her; they sailed from Belfast on the 17th 
April, 1849, on board the bark " Nelson ville," and arrived in Quebec in June 
following. She had expected to meet her son James at Quebec, but heard 
that he had gone to Montreal. She went from place to place, seeking her 
son, but died in Hamilton, Out., on the 12th of July, without seeing him. 
This son furnished means to bring her to America. 

Sarah Riddell 3 (1), eldest daughter of Robert' 2 (1), was born in Bal- 
linaman, County Monaghan, Ireland ; was married to a Mr. John Robin- 
son, who went to America, and left his wife and six children in the care 
of her father ; one of her daughters married Robert Heatly, and was over 
80 in 1874. 

Martha Riddell 3 (1), second daughter of Robert' 2 (1), was born in 
Ballinaraan, County Monaghan, Ireland ; was married to Adam Cook, 
and emigrated to America previous to 1797; these settled in Fredericks- 
burgh, Va. 

Mary Riddell 3 (1), third daughter of Robert' 2 (1), was born in Balli- 
naman, County Monaghan, Ireland ; was married to James Hamilton, set- 
tled in Manchester, Eng., and had issue; she died at the age of 56. 

William Riddell 3 (1), second son of Robert 2 (1), was born in Balli- 
naman, Ii-eland ; emigrated to America, and entered the army in the war 
of 1812. He was a sergeant in the company of Captain Jett, Twentieth 
Regiment, U. S. Infantry, and received a grant of one hundred and sixty 
acres of land in the State of Illinois. He died, and the land was made 
over to his sister, Mrs. Martha Cook, and the other heirs-at-law, to hold 
as tenants in common. This tract of land was in Hancock County, of 
which Carthage is the seat. 

Dr. John Riddell 3 (1), third son of Robert' 2 (1), was born in the 
town of Ballinaman, County Monaghan, Ireland, and died in Rio de Janei- 
ro, where he was acting as surgeon in the English army. Was at home 
once, eleven months, on half-pay. 

Joseph Riddell 3 (1), fourth son of Robert 2 (l),was born in the town 
of Ballinaman, Ireland, in 1797 ; married Catherine Clark, in Ireland, and 
had issue eight children, of whom hereafter. He sold his farm in Mona- 
ghan, Ireland, and removed to Manchester, Eng., to live with his two 



RIDDELLS OF BALLINAMAN, IRELAND. 163 

daughters. His wife, to whom he was married in 1820, died in Manches- 
ter, Aug. 17, 1867. Mr. Riddell was living in 1874. 

Robert Riddell 3 (2), fifth son of Robert 2 (1), was born in the town 
of Ballinaman, County Monaghan, Ireland, and has issue a numerous 
family, of whom hereafter. He lives on his father's homestead, and car- 
ries on a farm. 



Thomas Riddell 3 (1), a son of James 2 (2), was born somewhere in 
England ; no other information. 

Robert Riddell 3 (3), a son of James 2 (2), was born in England, and 
was in the Eighty-first Regiment of Eoot in 1816 ; since that time (when 
he visited his uncles) nothing is known of him. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

James Riddell 4 (3), eldest son of James 3 (2), was born in the town of 
Ballinaman, County Monaghan, Ireland, about 1821; emigrated to Can- 
ada, in 1840-1, sailing from Warrensport, Ireland, in the ship "Dolphin" ; 
he is now (1878) residing in Hamilton, Ont. 

Jane Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of James 3 (2), was born in Balli- 
naman, Ireland, in 1819; was married to William Painter ; resides in Fair- 
port, N. Y., and has issue three children. 

William Riddell 4 (2), second son of James 3 (2), was born in Balli- 
naman, Ireland, and died there at the age of 21 years. 

Robert Riddle 4 (4), third son of James 3 (2), was born in Ballinaman, 
Ireland, in 1827 ; emigrated to Canada, in 1849, and is now (1873) in 
Rochester, 1ST. Y., engaged in lumbering* He married Dec. 14, 1852, to 
Dolly-Sophia Morton ; no issue. Mr. Riddle (as he spells his name) was 
three years in the Union army during the Rebellion, and was wounded in 
his right fore-arm, May 8, 1864, in the battle of the Wilderness; and in the 
left shoulder and cheek (breaking his under jaw), April 1, 1865, at the 
battle of Big Five Forks. Receives a pension. 

Jane Riddell 4 (2), second daughter of James 3 (2), was born in Balli- 
naman, Ireland, and died at the age of eleven in 1841-2. 

John Riddell 4 (2), fourth son of James 3 (2), was born in Ballinaman, 
Ireland, in 1832-3, emigrated to Canada, in 1849, and in 1873 had built a 
house and was living with family in Alpena, Mich. 



Jane Riddell 4 (2), eldest daughter of Joseph 3 (1), was born in Balli- 
naman, Ireland, Dec. 13, 1821 ; was married to John Aspinall, Nov. 
18, 1841 ; emigrated to New York, and died there. 

Catherine Riddell 4 (1), second daughter of Joseph 3 (1), was born in 
Ballinaman, Ireland, Oct. 15, 1823; died unmarried in New York. 

Mary Riddell 4 (2), third daughter of Joseph 3 (1), was born in Balli- 
naman, Ireland, Oct. 28, 1825 ; was married to Richard Gleenhalgh, 
an engineer, at Manchester, Eng. No issue. 

Elizabeth Riddell 4 (1), fourth daughter of Joseph 3 (1), was born in 
Ballinaman, Ireland, Sept. 18, 1828. 

Sarah Riddell 4 (2), fifth daughter of Joseph 3 (1), was born in Balli- 

* Robert Riddle, of Rochester, N. Y., states that his uncle Robert had children, 
James, Jane, Eliza, Mary, in addition to those given above ; these may have deceased 
before I had correspondence with the family in England, in 1872, as Mr. Robert 
Riddle emigrated to America in 1849 ; or some of the preceding children may have 
been double-named, one authority giving oue name, and another the middle name. 



164 BIDDELLS OF RAY. IRELAND. 

naruan, Ireland, April 8, 1831 ; and was married to George Wellcr, as hi> 
second wife, Oct. 15, 1867 ; living in 1873. 

Martha Riddell 4 (2), sixth daughter of Joseph 3 (1), was horn in Bal- 
linaman, Ireland, June 28, 1833 ; died in Ireland. 

Alllia-Bella Riddell 4 (1 ), seventh daughter of Joseph 3 (1), was born in 
Ballinaman, Ireland, Sept. 23, 1836; was married as first wife, to George 
Weller, Aug. 24, 1862, and died Dec. 23, 1865, leaving one daughter. He 
afterwards married her sister. 

William Riddell 4 (3), only son of Joseph 3 (1), was born in Balli- 
naman, Ireland, Jan. 13, 1839; died there, unmarried. 



John Riddell 4 (3), eldest son of Robert 3 (2), was born in Ballinaman, 
Ireland, and lives on the farm with his father. 

William Riddell 4 (-1), second son of Robert 8 (2), was horn in Balli- 
naman, Ireland, and lives on the home farm. 

Sarah Riddell 4 (3), eldest daughter of Robert 3 (2), was born in Bal- 
linaman, Ireland, and was at home in 1873. 

Robert Riddell 4 (5), third son of Robert 3 (2), was born in Ballinaman. 
Ireland, and is in business in the city of Manchester, as an iron-monger, 
with his brother. 

Joseph Riddell 4 (2), fourth son of Robert 3 (2), was born in Balli- 
naman, Ireland, and is carrying on the business of an iron-monger, at 
Manchester, Eng. 

Alice Riddell 4 (1), second daughter of Robert 3 (2), was born in Bal- 
linaman, Ireland; married and keeps a provision-shop ; do not know where. 



RIDDELLS OF RAY, IRELAND. 

•John Riddell 1 (1), parents unknown, lived in the parish of Ray (or 
Rye), in the County of Donegal, Ireland, and is supposed to be a relative 
of the Riddles who emigrated from the same parish and settled in the 
County of York, Penn. (see Riddles of Chambersburgh, Penn.) He mar- 
ried Jane Rodgers, of the Moyle, and had issue, of whom hereafter. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

John Riddell' 2 (2), a son of John 1 (1), was born in the parish of Ray, 
County of Donegal, Ireland ; married Thompson, and had issue sev- 
eral children, of whom hereafter. He and his family were buried in All 
Saints' church-yard. 

George Riddell" (1), a son of John 1 (1), was born in the parish of 
Ray, County of Donegal, Ireland ; married and had issue, of whom here- 
after. He emigrated to the United States, and acquired considerable prop- 
erty ; deceased many years ago, leaving will, that in caseins two daughters, 
then unmarried, died without issue, his estate should go to his brother John 
and his nephew James, in Ireland. One daughter married, but died issue- 
less, and the other died single, and their property was sold, and 81,500 
was deposited for his brother John, but never secured by him. The names 
of the daughters and their residence do not appear. 



RIDDEL LS OF GLASSLOUGH, IRELAND. 165 

THIRD GENERATION. 

James Riddle 3 (1), eldest son of John 2 (2), was born in the parish of 
Ray, County of Donegal ; married Maria Moffit, and emigrated to New- 
ark, N. J. He had learned the watch-maker's trade, in Londonderry, 
Ireland, and carried on business some years at Strabane, in County Don- 
egal. He had issue two children, of whom hereafter. He died many years 
ago. 

John Riddle 3 (3), youngest son of John 2 (2), was born in the parish 
of Ray, County of Donegal, Ireland ; married Sarah Hamilton, sister of 
Dr. Hamilton ; died without issue, and was buried in All Saints' church- 
yard. He learned the watch-maker's trade of his brother James, and had 
a shop at Ramelton, Ireland. 

Susan Riddle 3 (1), eldest daughter of John 2 (2), was born in the parish 
of Ray, County Donegal, Ireland, in 1796; was married to John Williams, 
of Moygah, and is now (1880) living* 

Catherine Riddle 3 (2), second daughter of John 2 (2), was born in the 
parish of Ray, County of Donegal, Ireland ; was married to Joseph Wil- 
son, and resided in the city of Coleraine, Ireland ; both are dead. 

Mary Riddle 3 (1), youngest daughter of John 2 (2), was born in the 
parish of Ray, County of Donegal, Ireland, and died at home, presumably 
unmarried. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

George Riddle 4 (2), only son of James 3 (1), was born at Strabane, 
Ireland, and died in New York, unmarried. 

Jane Riddle 4 (1), only daughter of James 3 (1), was born at Strabane, 
Ireland, and died in New York, unmarried. 



RIDDELLS OF GLASSLOUGH, IRELAND. 

Walter Riddell 1 (1) was presumably descended from the family of 
Glen-Riddell, Dumfrieshire, Scotland, an offshoot of the baronial family 
of Roxburghshire, Scotland. He left his kinspeople and his native land in 
consequence of a quarrel concerning the Jacobite and Covenanting ques- 
tions, which were agitated in Scotland, contemporary with his settlement 
in Ireland, in the former part of the eighteenth century. He was, it is 
supposed, a son, — or possibly a brother, — of Robert Riddell, the second 
laird of Glen-Riddell, whose genealogy and history will be found in this 
work, under denomination of " Riddells of Glen-Riddell," which see. He 
was sometime of Glasslough, in the County of Monaghan ; it is not at 

* The only male representative of this family in Ireland (so far as known) is a 
grandson of Mrs. Susan (Riddell) Williams, of Newton-Cunningham, who is called 
John-James Riddle. The surname was spelled Riddell by the ancestors of this 
family. The family Bible containing the records has been lost, and the early parish 
records are not extant. A gentleman, named Marshall, whose grandmother was a 
Riddell, was in Ireland some twenty-seven years ago, to learn the history of his 
ancestry, and visited Mrs. Susan (Riddell) Williams, informing her of her brother's 
death in New Jersey. There was also an American named Colon Reid who visited 
Ray many years ago, and said a Dr. Riddle was about to visit the parish to look up 
his ancestry. Was this Rev. David H. Riddle, i>. d., of Martinsburgh, Va. ? 



166 BIDDELLS OF GLASSLOUGH, IRELAND. 

present known what influence attracted him to that place, or what was 
his exact condition there; it is probable, however, that he was induced to 
settle there by the influence of the Leslie family, who were, and are still, 
the principal landed proprietors of the district, and who were from Scot- 
land. Mr. Riddell is known to have enjoyed a good social position, as 
became his own origin, from the marriage-connections of himself and son, 
and from the fact that he was possessed of considerable land-estates, part 
of which were situated near Blackwatertown, on the borders of the County 
of Armagh,where afield is still pointed out and known as "Riddell'sMoor." 
He married a Miss Burgess, a member of a well-known county family, or 
of a branch thereof, now represented at Parkmaur, County of Tyrone, 
but formerly of Wood Park, County of Armagh. He is described as hav- 
ing been a very godly man, a member of the Church of Scotland, and 
strongly imbued with Calvinistic principles. He died 1775, having had 
issue one son, who appears to have been their only child. I append the 
following note, to show the grounds upon which the family base their claim 
to relationship with the baronial family of Scotland ; the matter in the 
note was furnished the author by the Rev. Walter Riddall, m. a., who 
compiled his family pedigree for this work.* 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Robert Riddell 2 (1), son of Walter 1 (1), was born, it is supposed, 
about 1745-50. He grew up a very different character from his father, 

* Rev. Walter Riddall says, " I am quite aware that it is stated aud assumed that 
the Glen-Riddell family failed iu the direct male line, and that it is supposed to be 
now represented by the descendants of John Riddell. a younger son of Walter, the 
first laird of Glen-Riddell. But this assumption is directly contradicted by the tra- 
dition of my branch family, and the facts of the case are such as both to confirm 
the tradition, aud at the same time to account for the contradictory assumption; so 
that the common statement concerning the failure of the direct male line of the 
Glen-Riddell family will require to be amended, or at least modified, even if I shall 
not succeed in giving absolute demonstrations of the truth of the tradition of my 
branch family, for I shall claim to be a or the direct representative of Glen-Riddell 
in the male line, unless and until the tradition of my family is proved to be false, 
which I am sure it never can. The facts on which I rest are the following, which 
I beg to commend to the careful consideration of the reader. (1.) The tradi- 
tion itself, which is constant and undoubted, and exists as clearly amongst the 
"Riddells of Richhill " (which see) as it does amongst my cousins: and I can bring 
many witnesses to vouch for it. Now, the tradition is a fact w T hich requires to be 
accounted for. I myself often heard it as a child from a sister of my father, a godly 
woman, who had no knowledge on the subject but what she had received from her 
father and mother, a pious pair, who cared nothing about the world's rank or honor. 
It is every way inconceivable and impossible that such a tradition could have sprung 
from imagination or invention; a hundred circumstances negative such an idea. 
How, then, is it to be accounted for? Simply and only by accounting it to be the 
truth. And the tradition has not had so very far to travel down the stream of time. 
The first person concerned in it died in 1775, and when I first heard it there were 
people still living who could have discredited it if recently invented. The tradition 
is that ' old Walter,' my first ancestor who came to Ireland, came from Glen-Riddell. 
in Scotland, having separated from his family, and dropped all connections with 
them, owing to a dispute about politics or religion (probably both). This is my 
first main fact. (2.) The leading Christian names in my family precisely agree 
with the tradition. The first Laird of Glen-Riddell was Walter, and the second was 
Robert; and in my family these two names have followed each other in the succes- 
sive generations without any deviation from strict regularity : so that there have 
been at the head of each generation, successively. Waller. Robert, Walter (2), Rob- 
ert (2), Walter (3), Robert (3) ; including my son as the last. Walter and Robert 
are emphatically the Glen-Riddell names. And it would seem from this that 'old 



BIDDELLS OF GLASSLOUGH, IBELAND. 167 

being dissolute and improvident, and was obliged to leave Glasslough 
after his marriage, owing to his profligate conduct, and eventually dissi- 
pated and lost all his father's property. He married, about 1768, Miss 
Sarah Ankittell, a daughter of Roger Ankitell, Esq., of Mount Ankitell, 
a grandson of the famous and gallant Matthew Ankitell, Esq., of Anki- 
tell' s Grove, County of Monaghan, who fell fighting in defence of the 
Protestant interest in 1688, at Drumbanagher, near Glasslough. These 
had issue one son (probably others), of whom hereafter. Soon after the 
birth of this son his mother died, leaving him in the care of his grand- 
father, his father having been obliged to quit the town. Robert married, 
secondly, his housekeeper, a Miss Eccles, by whom he had three sons, some 
of whose descendants have become well known in the United States. (See 
"Riddells of Richhill," in this work.) It is not unlikely that Robert may 
have had other sons besides the three mentioned. There are Riddells, or 
Riddles, now living in the vicinity of Glasslough, whose origin seems un- 
certain, but who may not improbably be considered as his descendants. 
Having lost all his property in gambling and dissipation, and having both 
talent and education, Robert turned his attention to the work of architect 
and builder, in which he was followed by his son, as will be hereinafter no- 
ticed. He became a converted, reformed character, under the preaching 
of the Methodists. The date of his death is unknown, but it probably 
occurred about 1800. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Walter Riddell 3 (2), eldest son of Robert' 2 (1), was born in or near 
Glasslough, County Monaghan, Ireland, 1770, and died Dec. 5, 1818. He 
was under the care of his grandfather, as before mentioned, until he was 
five years old, and received in early years seeds of religious instruction, 
which by God's grace he never lost. On his grandfather's death, he was 
kept for a time among his mother's relatives ; but was afterwards restored 
to 1 lis father, who gave him all possible advantages of education. He was 

Walter,' my ancestor, was very probably the eldest son of Robert, the second laird 
of Glen-Riddell. This is my second fact. (3.) The time at which 'old Walter' 
lived would agree with his having - been a son of Robert, the second of Glen-Riddell. 
He died in 1775, five years after the birth of his grandson, who was my grandfather. 
(4.) The time also agrees with that portion of the tradition which refers to the 
family feud about politics and religion. During the former half of the last century 
there were fierce disputes in Scotland, with Jacobites and Covenanters. I do not 
know what side my ancestor may have taken; but this much is certain, that he was 
a very godly man, a member of the Church of Scotland, and strongly imbued with 
Calvinistic principles. This last I have from a statement written by my grand- 
mother, giving a short account of her husband, after his death, but which, I fear, 
is lost. I have now stated the facts on which I rely, and I think it is easy to un- 
derstand how, under the circumstances, my ancestor, 'old Walter,' was ignored and 
lost sight of by his family, and how his stiff Scotch temper would prevent his at- 
tempting to reopen communication, and thus how it came to be assumed that Glen- 
Riddell had died out in the direct male line, though it had survived in Ireland all 
the time. I do not press the conclusion that my ancestor was necessarily the eldest 
son of Glen-Riddell; but that he was one of the sons (or a brother, possibly), I 
have no doubt I only ask that the claim which I have advanced, may be fairly 
and fully considered and fairly stated ; having no doubt but that further investiga- 
tions will confirm it hereafter." Mr. Riddall will continue to investigate the his- 
tory of his family and forward every new fact until the last moment before this 
goes to press. I should here state that Sir Walter-Buchanan Riddell, Bart., in a 
letter to Rev. Walter Riddall, says, "I am sure you are right to consider yourself 
one of the family of the Riddells'of Riddell." Sir Walter's testimony should have 
weight, as coming from the " Chief." 



168 RIDDELLS OF &LASSLOUGH, IRELAND. 

early brought under Methodist influences, and began at a very early age 
to exhort, and finally became one of their regular preachers. He married, 
about 1795, Miss Anne OTIanlon, daughter of James O'Hanlon, a mer- 
chant of Blackwatertown, County Armagh, who was a Roman Catholic, 
and a member of the great O'Hanlon clan, who at one time, before the 
plantation of Ulster, possessed about one-third of the land in the County 
of Armagh. His wife and daughter, however, were both pious Protestants. 
He had issue a numerous family, of whom hereafter. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Sarah Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of Walter 3 (2), was married to 
John Ralston, a farmer, a descendant of Richard Ralstone, one of the 
original patentees of the plantation of Ulster, and who held one thousand 
acres of land in Lemore, County Armagh. She and her husband are both 
dead ; they had three sons, two of them now living. 

Elizabeth Riddell 4 (1), second daughter of" Walter 3 (2), married 
Robert Ralston (or Roulstone, as the name was originally spelt), brother 
of her sister's husband before mentioned, and died without issue. 

Martha Riddell 4 (1), third daughter of Walter 3 (2), was married to 
G. Taylor, of Dangannore, and died leaving issue one son and three 
daughters. 

Margaret Riddell 4 (1), fourth daughter of Walter 3 (2), was married 
to Henry Riddell, her kinsman, of Richhill, and died in Australia, without 
children. 

Robert Riddall 4 (2), eldest son of Walter 3 (2), was born March 22, 
1810; died March 24, 1*73. He and his brother James adopted the spell- 
ing Iliddall, which is continued in this family at the present time. Robert 
early conceived the idea of recovering the fortune and position lost by his 
grandfather, and was at one time about taking steps to recover by law a 
portion of the property lost in gambling. From this, however, he desisted ; 
but by his energy and prudence, eventually became possessed of property 
in the same neighborhood, the townlands of Tyregarty and Ballytrodden, 
near Blackwatertown ; besides other property in the County Armagh and 
County Tyrone. He was appointed, when quite a youth, to the important 
office of seneschal of the manor of Inishowen, County Donegal, and also 
entered into business as a corn and flour miller, at Longyvallen, near Ar- 
magh, in which he was very successful. He also held the office of Deputy 
Registrar of the Diocese and Province of Armagh, under his relative, 
George Scott, Esq., whom he eventually succeeded as Principal Registrar; 
and also afterwards became District Registrar of Her Majesty's Court of 
Probate at Armagh. He was a Justice of the Peace and a grand juror 
for the County Armagh. He married, in 1846, Harriet, daughter of the 
late Samuel Gardner, Esq., Justice of the Peace, of Armagh, who sur- 
vived him and died in 1870. They had no issue. He generously took 
paternal charge of his brother James' family, on his early death in 1850, 
and they inherit the most of his estate and wealth. Mr. Riddall was a man 
of high character anrl sterling principle; and in his latter years actuated 
by genuine though unostentatious piety. There is a mural tablet erected 
to his memory in St. Mark's Church, at Armagh. The influence of his 
life is manifested amongst his kindred, who hold him in grateful memory. 

Rev. James Riddall 4 (1), second son of Walter 3 (2), was born Sept. 
21, 1816, and died Nov. 10, 1850, the perpetuator of his family line. He 
and his brother were educated and advanced in life by their mother's 



BIDDELLS OF GLASSLOUGH, IRELAND. 169 

cousin, George Scott, Esq., of Armagh, Registrar of the Diocese and Prov- 
ince of Armagh. He (James) commenced business for himself when 
scarcely twenty years of age, in the city of Armagh, as an iron-monger. 
He married, in 1839, Miss Jemima Parkinson, daughter of Edward 
Parkinson, an assistant master of the Royal School, Armagh, and sister 
of the late Rev. William Parkinson, a. m., of Ballysillan, Belfast. They 
had issue five children, of whom hereafter. They were both pious and 
attached members of the Primitive Methodist Society, and of the Estab- 
lished Church of England and Ireland. James Riddall was a mfted fa- 
vorite local preacher among the Methodists, and took the cold from which 
he died, while out on a preaching expedition. His wife survived him 
eighteen years, and died, much lamented by her family, Jan. 17, 1868. A 
memoir of Mr. Riddall was published by the Primitive Methodist Society, 
Great Georges Street, Dublin, in 1851. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

Rev. Walter Riddall 5 (3), eldest son of James 4 (1), was born June 
20, 1841; married, in 1867, Mary-Roe Coates, eldest daughter of Charles 
Coates, Esq., barrister-at-law, of Harcourt Street, Dublin, and of Jankersley, 
County Wicklow, by whom he has a numerous family, of whom hereafter. 
Educated at Armagh Royal School and Trinity College, Dublin, where he 
was a Royal Exhibitioner and First Honor Man, also Classical Scholar ; 
graduated A. B. and A. M. Ordained to the ministry of the Established 
Church of England and Ireland, and curate of Kilmore Cathedral, County 
Cavan, 1866; having previously been appointed Deputy Registrar of the 
Diocese and Province of Ulster, under his uncle, Robert Riddall, Esq. 
He was subsequently appointed Vicar Choral of Armagh Cathedral, by 
His Grace, the present Lord Archbishop of Armagh. This appointment, 
however, he resigned, and went as curate in sole charge to the parish of 
Newtown, County Meath, of which the late well-known Rev. F.F.French 
was then rector. Was next appointed vicar of Glencraig, County of 
Down ; which he resigned on account of health breaking down, and went 
as British Chaplain to Turin, north Italy. Returning to Ireland in 
December, 1870, became curate in sole charge at Killeany, County Armagh, 
of which the late Rev. A. Irwin, precentor of Armagh Cathedral, was 
then rector; and succeeded, on Rev. A. Irwin's death, as rector of Kil- 
leany (Mallaghan). Removed thence to the incumbency of St. John's, 
Malone, Belfast, his present appointment. He was author of one or two 
pamphlets, and is one of the first contributors to " Kottabos," a classical 
publication of T. C. D (Trinity College, Dublin) ; also contributes to the 
Irish Church Advocate. Mr. Riddall has manifested considerable in- 
terest in this work, and has, at great pains, collected the genealogy and 
history of his family as herein presented. He intends to continue his 
investigations concerning the ancestral connections of his family, antici- 
pating full substantiation of the family tradition. 

George-Scott Riddall 5 (1), second son of James 4 (1), was born May 
1, 1843, and succeeded his uncle, Robert 4 (2), as corn and floor miller, at 
Longyvallen, Armagh ; resides at Altavellen, Armagh. Married first, in 
1869, Ellen, daughter, of Thomas Scott, Esq. She died without issue 
September, 1876. He married secondly, in 1878, Ida, daughter of Charles 
Schule, of Newcastle-on-Tyne, Eng. ; who has issue one daughter, of 
whom hereafter. " Altavellen," the residence of Mr. Riddall, is a mag 



170 HIDDELLS OF BWITHTLL. IBELAND. 

nificent modern house, situated on a commanding site, surrounded by orna- 
mental shrubbery. 

Rev. Edward-P. Riddall 5 (2), third son of James 4 (1), was born 
Nov. 4, 1846; married, in 1877, Hen rietta-Se ward Bayley, daughter of the 
late Charles-Cheetham Bayley, Esq., Justice of the Peace, of the Poplars, 
Plymouth Grove, Manchester, Eng. ; educated at Royal School, Armagh, 
and Trinity College, Dublin, where he was Royal Exhibitioner, First 
Honor Man, and Classical Scholar ; graduated A. B. and A. M. He was 
ordained curate of St. James', Belfast, 1870 ; rector of Ballymore, County 
Westmeath, 1872, and soon after rector of Moate, in the same County. 
He removed thence to Cork Cathedral, and St. Finbar's, as curate to the 
late well-known and lamented Very Rev. Achilles Daunt, d. d., Dean of 
Cork; was appointed chaplain at Argostoli, Cephalonia, Ionian Islands, 
where he resided for a few months without resigning his curacy of Cork 
Cathedral. He was appointed, in 1879, rector of Vastina, County of 
Westmeath, which appointment he still holds. 

Anne-Eliza Riddall 5 (1), eldest daughter of James 4 (1), was born 
April 4, 1840 ; was married, in 1864, to Robert McCrum, Esq., Justice of 
the Peace, Milford, Armagh; died Jan. 8, 1869, having had issue a son 
and a daughter. 

Harriet Riddall 5 (1), youngest child of James 4 (1), was born in 1850; 
has never married. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

Robert-James Riddall 6 (3), eldest son of Walter 5 (3), was born Ana:. 
25, 187:*. 

Walter-George Riddall 6 (4), second son of Walter 5 (3), was born 
Feb. 8, 1S74. 

George-Spencer-Charles Riddall 6 (2), third son of Walter 5 (3), was 
born Jan. 15, 1875. 

James-Edward Riddall 6 (3), fourth son of Walter 5 (3), was born Dec. 
12, 1876. 

Charles-Coates Riddall 6 (1), fifth son of Walter 5 (3), was born March 
22 1878 

" Jane- Alice Riddall 6 (1). 
Mary-Roe Riddall 6 (1). Daughters of Walter 5 (3), all at home. 
Jemima Riddall 6 (1). 



RIDDELLS OF RICHHILL, IRELAND. 

Robert RiddelP (1), a son of Walter 1 (1), and his wife Burgess, mar- 
ried two wives; the first was Sarah Anskittell, by whom he became an- 
cestor of the "Riddells of Glasslough," which see, and the second was 
Miss Eccles (who had been his servant), by whom he became ancestor of 
the " Riddells of Richhill." It will be seen that both families unite in one 
common ancestor, namely, Walter Riddell. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Robert Riddell 2 (2), eldest son of Robert 1 (1). was born Aug. 30, 1780 ; 
married in May, 1799, to Ann, daughter of Robert and Sarah Douglas, of 



niDDELLS OF EICHIIILL, IBELAND. 171 

Annaghagh, near Grange Church, Armagh, and had issue, of whom here- 
after. Mr. Riddell was a farmer in Ballylaney, near Richhill, County 
Armagh, Ireland ; died September, 1842, and was buried at Kilmore, near 
Richhill. 

James Riddell 2 (1), second son of Robert 1 (1), was born in Armagh, 
Ireland ; married Jane Long, and had issue. He emigrated to America, 
and settled in Philadelphia, Penn., where he is supposed to have died. 
He had two sons, Robert and George, of whom hereafter. 

Thomas Riddell 2 (1), third son of Robert 1 (1), was born in County 
Armagh, Ireland; emigrated to America before the war of 1812, and was 
a commissioned officer in the United States service, and lost a leg in an 
engagement, in consequence of which he was a pensioner during the re- 
mainder of his days. He died many years ago. No account of a family. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Isabella Riddell 3 (1), eldest daughter of Robert- (2) and his wife, 
Ann Douglas, was born in Ballylaney, County Armagh, Ireland, May 16, 
1800; was married in June, 1822, to John Falloon, a farmer, and died 
Jan. 13, 1879. 

Robert Riddell 3 (3), eldest son of Robert 2 (2) and his wife, Ann 
Douglas, was born at Ballylaney, County Armagh, Ireland, April 10, 
1802, and never married. He was a farmer; died Jan. 14, 1867. 

James Riddell 3 (2), second son of Robert 2 (2) and Ann Douglas, his 
wife, was born in Ballylaney, County Armagh, Ireland, June 24, 1804 ; 
married in August, 1829, to Alice Hayes, and died in New Zealand. He 
is supposed to have had a family. 

John Riddell 3 (2), third son of Robert 2 (2), was born in Ballylaney, 
County Armagh, Ireland, Dec. 24, 1806; married in October, 1840, to Sa- 
rah Hardy, and has issue seven children, of whom hereafter. He is a 
farmer at Richhill, County Armagh. 

Walter Riddell 3 (2), fourth son of Robert 2 (2), was born in Bally- 
laney, County Armagh, Ireland, Sept. 14, 1808 ; married Nov. 15, 1888, 
to Mary Rush, of Marlacoo, near Markethill, and has issue seven children, 
of whom hereafter. He is a farmer at Richhill, County Armagh, — a man 
of sound mind and great force of will : a characteristic type of this family. 

Thomas Riddell 3 (2), fifth son of Robert 2 (2), was born in County 
Armagh, Ireland, Aug. 12, 1810; married in September, 1836, to Mary- 
Jane O'Berry, of Portadown, and had issue three children, of whom here- 
after. Mr. Riddell emigrated to America and died there. 

Henry Riddell 3 (1), sixth son of Robert 2 (2) and Ann Douglas, his 
wife, was born at Ballylaney, County Armagh, Ireland, May 16, 1812 ; 
married Margaret Riddell, his cousin, of Glasslough, County Monaghan, 
Ireland, and emigrated to New Zealand, where he now lives. 

Sarah Riddell 3 (1), second daughter of Robert 2 (2) and Ann Doug- 
las, was born in Ballylaney, County Armagh, Ireland, May 28, 1814; 
was married Aug. 16, 1849, to David Foster, of Richhill, and died April 
30, 1850. 

William Riddell 3 (1), seventh son of Robert 2 (2), was born in Bally- 
laney, County Armagh, Ireland, Oct. 17, 1816, and died unmarried, in 
August, 1848. 

Saninel Riddell 3 (1), eighth son of Robert 2 (2), was born in Bally- 
laney, County Armagh, Ireland, Sept. 8, 1818, and died in August, 1819. 

Mary Riddell 3 (1), third daughter of Robert 2 (2), was born in Bally- 



• 



17- UIDDELLS OF RICHHILL, TEELAND. 

laney, County Armagh, Ireland, in March, 1820 ; was married in April, 
1845, to Robert Chapman, and resides at Dobbin, near Portadown, Ireland. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Susannah Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of John 8 (2) and Sarah Hardy, 
his wife, was born at Richhill, County Armagh, Ireland, June 12, 1851, 
and was married to Charles Hardy (probably a cousin), of Richhill. 

William Riddell 4 (2), eldest son of John 8 (2) and Sarah Hardy, was 
born at Richhill, County Armagh, Ireland, May 9, 1853, and died in New 
York, in September, 1876. 

Allllie Riddell 4 (1), second daughter of John 3 (2) and Sarah Hardy, 
was born at Richhill, County Armagh, Ireland, Jan. 13, 1855, and was 
married in Ohio. 

Robert-Henry Riddell 4 (4), second son of John 3 (2) and Ids wife, 
Sarah Hardy, was born at Richhill, County Armagh, Ireland, March 10, 
1857 ; resides at Richhill. 

Sarah Riddell 4 (2), third daughter of John 3 (2) and his Avife, Sarah 
Hardy, was born at Richhill, County of Armagh, Ireland, Oct. 4, 1858; 
resides at home. 

Thomas-James Riddell 4 (3), third son of John 3 (2) and his wife, 
Sarah Hardy, was born at Richhill, County Armagh, Ireland, Jan. 28, 
1860 : resides at home. 



Annie-Eliza Riddell 4 (2), eldest daughter of Walter 3 (2), died young. 

John-Robert Riddell 4 (3), eldest son of Walter 3 (2) and his wife, 
Mary Rush, was born at Richhill, County Armagh, Ireland, June 15, 1850; 
died" at home, Nov. 3, 1872. 

Hugh Riddell 4 (1), second son of Walter 3 (2) and Mary Rush, was 
born at Richhill, County Armagh, Ireland, Sept. 18, 1853, and resides at 
Richhill. 

William Riddell 4 (3), third son of Walter 3 (2) and Mary Rush, was 
born at Richhill, County Armagh, Ireland, Nov. 9, 1855, and resides at 
Richhill. 

Annie-Eliza Riddell 4 (3), second daughter of Walter 3 (2) and Mary 
Rush, was born at Richhill, Nov. 6, 1857 ; was married to R. Magowan, 
of Derry-Hale. 

Walter Riddell 4 (4), fourth son of Walter 3 (2) and Mary Rush, was 
born at Richhill, County Armagh, Ireland, Jan. 28, 1859, and resides at 
Richhill. 

Thomas-Henry Riddell 4 (4), fifth son of Walter 8 (2) and Mary Rush, 
was born at Richhill, County Armagh, Ireland, Nov. 30, 1864; resides at 
Belfast, Ireland. 



John Riddell 4 (4). ) 

James Riddell 4 (4). n , -, i f T 8 /m 

Martha Riddell 4 (1). f Chlldren of James (*)' 



Letitia Riddell 4 (1). 

Ann Riddell 4 (1). 
Jane Riddell 4 (1). 
Sarah Riddell 4 (3). 



Ann Riddell 4 (1). 

Jane Riddell 4 (1). V Children of Thomas 3 (2). 



SID DELLS OF STRABANE, IRELAND. 173 



RIDDELLS OF STRABANE, IRELAND. 

[Pennsylvania Branch.] 

John Riddell 1 (1), whose parents are unknown, was born in Stra- 
bane,* County of Tyrone (Judge Riddell says County Donegal), in the 
north of Ireland, and, with his brothers, emigrated to Westmoreland Coun- 
ty, Penn., about six months before the breaking out of the war of the Rev- 
olution. He made a "Tomahawk Improvement " on the waters of Turtle 
Creek, but when the war broke out entered the American army for six 
months as a volunteer, and at the expiration of that time he enlisted dur- 
ing the war. At the close of the war he returned to Turtle Creek, and 
continued the improvement of his land, making that his permanent home. 
He married Isabella Gaut, and had issue three children, of whom here- 
after. He died in his prime, and was buried in the old " Riddle grave- 
yard," near New Salem, and his monument, erected there by his father, 
has nothing but his name inscribed on it. 

Robert Riddell 1 (1), a brother to the preceding, was born in Stra- 
bane, County of Tyrone, in the north of Ireland, and with his brothers, 
came to Westmoreland County, Penn., about six months previous to the 
war of the Revolution. He enlisted in the Colonial army for six months ; 
subsequently, at the end of his first term of service, enlisted during the 
war, and died in camp. 

William Riddell 1 (1), a half-brother of the preceding, was born in 
Strabane, County Tyrone, in the north of Ireland, and came to West- 
moreland County, Penn., previous to the war of the Revolution. He 
owned a farm near New Salem, where he lived and died. He married 
twice; the first wife was Nancy , and the second wife Peggy 



by each of these he had issue three children, of whom hereafter. I do 
not know when he died. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Robert Riddle 2 (2), eldest son of John 1 (1), was born in the County 
of Westmoreland, Penn., in 1796, and his guardian bound him out to a 
distant relative, — he being about seven years old at his father's death, — 
and at the age of seventeen he was apprenticed to a blacksmith, and 
learned that trade. He was married at the age of twenty-one, to Miss 
Mary Williamson, and had issue four children, of whom hereafter. He 
died in 1863, aged 67 years. 

Jollll Riddle 2 (2), second son of John 1 (1), was born in the County 
of Westmoreland, Penn., about 1798 ; married to Elizabeth Williamson 
(probably a sister of Mary as above), and had issue six children, of whom 
hereafter. He is now (1874) living near Centreville, Butler County, Penn. 

Riddle 2 (1), only daughter of John 1 (1), was born in Westmore- 
land County, Penn. ; was married to John McMasters, who died, leaving 
her a widow with one son and four daughters. She married, secondly, 
John Gordon, and had a son and a daughter ; she lived on Mill Creek, Ver- 
rango County. Her eldest son is a clergyman ; the second a doctor. 



* Strabane is a market-town iu the County of Tyrone, Ireland, on the River 
MouHpie, one hundred and thirty miles north-north-west from Dublin, with which 
it is connected by railway. It communicates with Londonderry, and thus with the 
sea by canal and river. The chief industry is the linen trade. Four churches, — one 
Episcopal, two Presbyterian, and one Catholic, — besides two Methodist meeting- 
houses. Population in 1871 was 4615. I cannot find the name Strabane, Straw- 
bane, nor Strawdown, on the map of County Donegal. 



174 RIDDELLS OF STBASANE, IRELAND. 

Robert Riddle' 2 (3), eldest son of William 1 (1), was born in the 
County of Westmoreland, Penn., in 1769; married Ann McClellan, of 
Scotch-Irish descent, and settled in Clinton township, Butler County, 
about 1798-9. He had issue six children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddle 
died Jan. 25, 1853, in his 84th year; his wife died Aug. 25, 1851, in her 
93d year. She was thirteen years old when she came across the oceau. 

Hugh Riddle' 2 (1), second son of William 1 (1), was born in the County 
of Westmoreland, Penn., March 5, 1771 ; married to Mary Gordon (she 
was born April 14, 1775), a woman of Scotch descent, and had issue 
eleven children, of whom hereafter. He settled in Clinton township, But- 
ler County, at' a place now called " Riddle's Cross-Roads," as a farmer, 
and died there Auer. 21, 1851. A wealthy man. 

William Riddle 2 (2), a son of William 1 (1), was born in the County 
of Westmoreland, Penn., and settled on his father's homestead farm, near 
Salem. He married, but I have failed to procure the family records. 

Naiicy Riddle' 2 (1), second daughter of William 1 (1), was born near 
Salem, Westmoreland County, Penn. ; was married and had issue. She 
lived somewhere in her native State. 

Betsey Riddle 2 (1), third daughter of William 1 (1), was born near. 
Salem, Westmoreland County, Penn., and was married to John McClelland- 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Nancy Riddle 8 (2), eldest daughter of Robert- (2), was born in West- 
moreland County, Penn., Sept. 11, 1807, and died Oct. 15, 1808. 

Isabella Riddle 3 (1), second daughter of Robert' 2 (2), was born in 
Westmoreland County, Penn., June 1, 1809, and died Nov. 14, 1809. 

Susan Riddle 3 (1), third daughter of Robert 2 (2), was born in West- 
moreland County, Penn., Jan. 11, 1811, and died Nov. 26, 1815. 

Hon. John-W. Riddle 3 (3), only son of Robert' 2 (2), was born in 
Westmoreland County, Penn., in 1813 ; married Margaret-Jack McMa- 
hon, July 5, 1837 (her mother was of the same family of Wilson that 
lived in Strabane at the time Mr. Riddle's grandfather emigrated), and 
settled in his native County as a farmer. He commenced life poor and is 
now in good circumstances. He represented his County in the State Leg- 
islature in 1863-4, and is now Associate Judge of Westmoreland County. 
Residence at Delmont. Educated in the common schools. Is widely 
known and highly respected ; a man of strong, practical mind and excel- 
lent ability. He had issue three children, of whom hereafter.* 



John-W. Riddle 3 (4), a son of John' 2 (2), was born near Centerville, 
Butler County, Penn., and is now dead. 

Robert Riddle 3 (4), a son of John 2 (2), was born near Centerville, 
Butler County, Penn., and has deceased. 

Samuel Riddle 3 (1), a son of John' 2 (2), was born in Butler County, 
Penn., and has deceased. 

James Riddle 3 (1), a son of John 2 (2), was born in Butler County, 
Penn. ; supposed to be dead. 

Isabella Riddle 3 (2), a daughter of^John 2 (2), was born in Butler 
County, Penn., and died in infancy. 

* This family of Riddles is connected with the " Riddles of Waseon, Ohio, " 
"Riddles of Lycoming, Pennsylvania," " Riddles of Belfont, Pennsylvania," and 
"Riddles of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania," which see. 



BIDDELLS OF STBABANE, 1BELAND. 175 

William Riddle 3 (3), eldest son of Robert 2 (3), was born in Butler 
County, Perm., 1798-9 ; married Mary Cunningham for his first wife, and 
by her had issue seven children, of whom hereafter. He married, sec- 
ondly, to Margaret, daughter of William Riddle 2 (2), who was a half- 
brother of Robert Riddle 2 (3), and by her had issue two children, of whom 
hereafter. He lived in Clinton, Butler County, Penn. Farmer ; died in 
1841. 

Susan Riddle 3 (2)', a daughter of Robert 2 (3), was born in Butler 
County, Penn.; was married to John McCall, and removed to the West. 

Esther Riddle 3 (1), a daughter of Robert 2 (3), was born in Butler 
County, Penn.; was married to William Culbreath, and settled in her 
native State. 

Nancy Riddle 3 (3), a daughter of Robert 2 (3), was born in Butler 
County, Penn.; was married to William McQueary, and removed to the 
West. 

Betsey Riddle 3 (1), a daughter of Robert 2 (3), was born in Butler 
County, Penn.; was married to John Duff, and lived at iEtna, Fillmore 
County, Minn. 

Jane Riddle 3 (1), a daughter of Robert' 2 (3), was born in Butler 
County, Penn.; married John Thompson, and lived in her native State. 

Jane Riddle 3 (2), eldest daughter of Hugh 2 (1), was born in Butler 
County, Penn., Nov. 9, 1796; was married to Robert Duff, and died Aug. 
27, 1874. 

Matthew Riddle 3 (1), eldest son of Hugh 2 (1), was born in Butler 
County, Penn., Sept. 20, 1798 ; married, and had children. He died March 
21, 1860. 

Elizabeth Riddle 3 (1), second daughter of Hugh' 2 (1), was born in 
Butler County, Penn.; was married to James Elliott, and resided at Sar- 
versville, Butler County, Penn. 

William Riddle 3 (4), second son of Hugh' 2 (1), was born in Butler 
County, Penn., Nov. 9, 1802; married to Margaret McClelland. 

Reheckah Riddle 3 (1), third daughter of Hugh 2 (1), was born in But- 
ler County, Penn., June 27, 1804; died Aug. 2, 1858. 

Robert Riddle 3 (5), third son of Hugh 2 (1), was born in Butler Coun- 
ty, Penn., Aug. 27, 1806. 

John Riddle 3 (5), fourth son of Hugh 2 (1), was born in Butler Coun- 
ty, Penn., Dec. 16, 1808, and died Aug/9, 1851. 

Mary Riddle 3 (1), fourth daughter of Hugh 2 (1), was born in Butler 
County, Penn., Feb. 8, 1811. 

Margaret Riddle 3 (2), fifth daughter of Hugh 2 (1), was born in Butler 
County, Penn., July 16, 1813; died June 10, 1873. 

Nancy Riddle 3 (4), sixth daughter of Hugh 2 (1), was born in Butler 
County, Penn., Nov. 14, 1816, and died Jan. 18, 1875. 

Isabella Riddle 3 (3), seventh daughter of Hugh 2 (1), was born in 
Butler County, Penn., Dec. 31, 1819, and died Sept. 23, 1836. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Samnel-McMahon Riddle 4 (2), eldest son of John 3 (3), was born at 
Delmont, Westmoreland County, Penn., March 8, 1840, and lives on his 
father's homestead ; unmarried in 1873. 

Dr. John-Robert Riddle 4 (6), second son of John 3 (3), was born at 
Delmont, Westmoreland County, Penn., May 30, 1843. He was educated 



176 ItlDDELLS OF STBABANE, TBELAND. 

at Elder's Ridge Academy, and studied under the supervision of Rev. 
Alexander Donaldson. He read medicine under Dr. Jno. McNeil, and 
after attending two full courses of lectures at Jefferson Medical College, 
Philadelphia, he graduated in the class of 1868-9. He commenced the 
practice of medicine in his native County, and continued there with ex- 
cellent success till 1870. He removed to Somersville, Cal., in 1871, and 
continued the active practice of his profession there until his death, which 
occurred suddenly Dec. 31, 1876. Dr. Riddle won an extensive patron- 
age, and was doing a lucrative business. He had ordered his portrait for 
this book, but died before it was finished. He manifested a deep and 
abiding interest in this work. 

Elizabeth-Mary Riddle 4 (2), only daughter of John 3 (3), was born in 
Westmoreland County, Penn., April 2, 1847, and was living at home with 
her parents in 1873, un married. 

Robert Riddle 4 (6), eldest son of William 3 (3), was born in Butler 
County, Penn., Jan. 4, 1820 ; married Jane Esler (she was born Dec. 16, 
1821), and had issue six children, of whom hereafter. He settled as a 
farmer at Riddle's Cross-Roads, Butler County, in his native State. 

Hugh Riddle 4 (2), second son of William 3 (3), was born at Riddle's 
Cross-Roads, Butler County, Penn., and died when a child. 

Nancy- Riddle 4 (5), eldest daughter of William 3 (3), was born at Rid- 
dle's Cross-Roads, Butler County, Penn., in 1823; was married to John 
Esler, and died June 14, 1852, aged 29 years. 

Johll-C. Riddle 4 (7), third son of William 3 (3), was born at Riddle's 
Cross-Roads, Butler County, Penn., May 12, 1825 ; married Elizabeth, 
daughter of John and Mary Anderson (she was born in same County. 
May 16, 1823), and settled near his birth-place ; now (1874) living at 
Sharpsburg, Allegheny County. He has issue eiyht children, of whom 
hereafter. 

William Riddle 4 (5), fourth son of William 3 (3), was born at Riddle's 
Cross-Roads, Butler County, Penn. (date not known), and died when a 
child. 

JameS-M. Riddle 4 (2), fifth son of William 8 (3), was born at Riddle's 

Cro>s-Roads, Butler County, Penn.; married Ann , and died Feb. 27, 

1863. His widow is living at Pittsburgh, and has four children living; 
two have deceased. 

Mary-Ann Riddle 4 (2), second daughter of William 3 (3), was born at 
Riddle's Cross-Roads, Penn.; was married, but had no children. She 
died Aug. 11, 1852, in her thirtieth year. 

Eliza-Jane Riddle 4 (1), third daughter of William 3 (3), was horn at 
Riddle's Cross-Roads, Penn., and is now dead ; she was presumably mar- 
ried, but had no children. 

Rebecca-Ellen Riddle 4 (3), fourth daughter of William 3 (3) (she and 
P^liza were by a second wife, Margaret Riddle), was born in Butler County, 

Penn., and was married to McLaughlan, and is now living. No 

children. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

William-Cunningham Riddell 5 (6), eldest son of Robert 4 (6), was 
born at Riddle's Cross-Roads, Butler County, Penn., Dec. 27, 1849, and is 
a carpenter by trade. Has kindly furnished the genealogy of this branch 
family. A line penman. 

James Riddle 5 (3), second son of Robert 4 (6), was born at Riddle's 



RIDDELLS OF NEWTON-STEWART, IRELAND. 177 

Crass-Roads, Butler County, Penn., Sept. 18, 1851; married Maggie, 
daughter of Stephen and Jane Brewer, and lives at the Cross-Roads. No 
issue. 

Robert-Esler Riddle 5 (7), third son of Robert 4 (6), was born at Rid- 
dle's Cross-Roads, Butler County, Penn., June 6, 1853; married Maggie, 
daughter of Frank and Maria Anderson, of the same County. He resides 
at Apollo, Armstrong' County, Penn. Painter by trade. 

Johll-Watt Riddle 5 (8), fourth son of Robert 4 (6), was born at Rid- 
dle's Cross-Roads, Butler County, Penn., April 18, 1855, and lives at home. 
Unmarried in 1879. 

David-McClelland Riddle 5 (1), fifth son of Robert 4 (6), was born at 
Riddle's Cross-Roads, Butler County, Penn., Oct. 31, 1856; married Alice, 
daughter of James M. and Ann Riddle, — his cousin, — and lives at 
Markle, Westmoreland County, Penn. 

Rebecca- Aim Riddle 5 (4), only daughter of Robert 4 (6), was born at 
Riddle's Cross-Roads, Butler County, Penn., Aug. 28, 1862, and was at 
home, unmarried, in 1879. 



Mary-A. Riddle 5 (3), eldest daughter of John 4 (7), was born at Rid- 
dle's Cross-Roads, Butler County, Penn., Aug. 23, 1849; was married 
March 14, 1867, to Newton Harvey. 

Margaret-A. Riddle 5 (3), second daughter of John 4 (7), was born at 
Riddle's Cross-Roads, Butler County, Penn., March 22, 1851; was married 
March 2, 1871, to Niblock Harvey, brother of Newton, husband of Mary. 

Sarah-E. Riddle 5 (2), third daughter of John 4 (7), was born at Rid- 
dle's Cross-Roads, Butler County, Penn., March 21, 1853 ; was married 
April 30, 1874, to Samuel Hemphill. 

Robert-A. Riddle 5 (8), eldest son of John 4 (7), was born at Riddle's 
Cross-Roads, Butler County, Penn., March 16, 1855. Unmarried in 1879. 

Jeilllie Riddle 5 (1), fourth daughter of John 4 (7), was born at Riddle's 
Cross-Roads, Butler County, Penn., June 28, 1857. Unmarried in 1879. 

Elmer-E. Riddle 5 (1), fifth daughter of John 4 (7), was born at Rid- 
dle's Cross-Roads, Butler Countv, Penn., Sept. 25, 1860. Unmarried in 
1879. 

Rebecca-M. Riddle 5 (5), fifth daughter of John 4 (7), was born at Rid- 
dle's Cross-Roads, Butler County, Penn., Jan. 22, 1862, and died Sept. 28, 
1877. 

Jollll-Gu Riddle 5 (9), third son of John 4 (7), was born at Riddle's Cross- 
Roads, Butler County, Penn., March 6, 1865. 

Elizabeth-A. Riddle 5 (3), sixth daughter of John 4 (7), was born at 
Riddle's Cross-Roads, Butler County, Penn., Aug. 1, 1867, and died March 
16, 1878. 



RIDDELLS OF NEWTON-STEWART, IRELAND. 

[Pennsylvania Branch.] 

Christopher Riddell 1 (1), descended from Scottish ancestors, was 
born at Newton-Stewart,* County of Tyrone, north of Ireland, in the 

* A town on the River Mourne, in the County Tyrone, not very far from Stra- 
bane, where other branches of the family lived. 
12 



178 EIDDELLS OF WEWTON-STEWART, IRELAND. 

year 1740; came to the United States in 1800, and settled in New York. 
He married in Ireland, and had issue several children (all born in the old 
country), of whom hereafter. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Elizabeth Riddell 2 (1), eldest daughter of Christopher 1 (1), was born 
at Newton-Stewart, Ireland, in 1767; came to America in 1772, and died 
unmarried in 1870, aged 103, probably in Philadelphia, Penn. 

Jane Riddell" (1), second daughter of Christopher 1 (1), was born at 
Newton-Stewart, Ireland, in 1769; came to America with her sister, in 
1772, and died in 1871. at the age of 100 years, probably in Philadelphia. 

Samuel Riddell' (1), a son of Christopher 1 (1), was born at Newton- 
Stewart, Ireland, in the year 1770 (?), came to the United States in 1772. 
and held a commission in the American army during the war of 1812 ; he 
was wounded at the battle of New Orleans, and received a pension. He 
married, and had issue eight children, of whom hereafter. Died in 1852. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Johll Riddle 3 (1), a son of Samuel 2 (1), was born in 1804; married 
Ann B. Eardman, and settled in Philadelphia, Penn.. where he deceased 
in 1852, leaving a widow (who died Nov. 26, 1857) and eight children. 

Margaret Riddle 3 (1), a daughter of Samuel 2 (1), was born in Phila- 
delphia, Penn., in 17S4 ; was married there and had a family. 

Christopher Riddle 3 (2), a son of Samuel 2 (1), was born in Philadel- 
phia, Penn., and died young, unmarried. 

Robert Riddle 3 (1), a son of Samuel 2 (1), was born in Philadelphia, 
Penn. ; married Miss Margaret Phipps (or Phillips), and had issue tico 
children (possibly others), now living (1873). Mr. Riddle resides in 
Philadelphia, and is wealthy. 

Eliza Riddle 3 (1), a daughter of Samuel 2 (1), was born in Philadel- 
phia, Penn., and died young, unmarried. 

William Riddle 3 (1), a son of Samuel 2 (1), was born in Philadelphia, 

Penn., in ; married Dec. 14, 1859, to Miss Caroline Earle, and by 

her had issue jive children. He married secondly, Mis. Mary Darnell, by 
whom he had tico children, of whom (with those by first wife) hereafter. 
Residence in Philadelphia. 

Mary Riddle 3 (1), youngest daughter of Samuel 2 (1), was born in 
Philadelphia, and died young, unmarried. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Henry Riddle 4 (1), eldest son of John 8 (1). was born in Philadelphia, 
Penn., Feb. 28, 1839, and died Sept. 28, 1867, presumably unmarried. 

Eliza Riddle 4 (2), eldest daughter of John 3 (1), was born in Phila- 
delphia, Penn., Oct. 6, 1840, and was married to S. Desher. 

Margaret Riddle 4 (2), second daughter of John 3 (1), was born in 
Philadelphia, Penn., Nov. 1, 1842, and died Jan. 4, 1867. 

Mary Riddle 4 (2), third daughter of John 3 (1), was born in Philadel- 
phia, Penn., Jan. 15, 1845, and was married to Samuel Yonker. 

Julia Riddle 4 (1), fourth daughter of John 3 (1), was born March 14, 
1847; unmarried in 1873. 

William Riddle 4 (2), second son of John 3 (1), wasjborn in Philadel- 
phia, Penn., March '2'2, 1849; unmarried in 1873. 

Auuie Riddle 4 (1), fifth daughter of John 3 (1), was born in Philadel- 
phia, Penn., March 10, 1851 ; unmarried. 



BIDDELLS OF NEWTON-STEWART, IRELAND. 179 

Caroline Riddle 4 (1), youngest daughter of John 3 (1), was born in 
Philadelphia, Penn., Sept. 10, 1852. 



Margaret Riddle 4 (3), a daughter of Robert 3 (1), was born in Phila- 
delphia, Penn. ; was married to Mr. Fries. 

Emma Riddle 4 (1), second daughter of Robert 3 (1), was born in 
Philadelphia, Penn., and was married to a Mr. E. Burns. 



S.-Earl Riddle 4 (1), eldest son of William 3 (1), was born in Philadel- 
phia, Penn., Feb. 22, 1852 ; married Oct. 13, 1875, to Miss M. Ella Brown, 
and resides in his native city. Mr. Riddle is traveling as agent for 
Edward K. Try on & Co., of Philadelphia, manufacturers of arms. He 
has manifested a deep interest in this genealogy, and has rendered valu- 
able assistance in securing data and subscriptions. 

Mary Riddle 4 (3), eldest daughter of William 3 (1), and twin to Earl, 
was born in Philadelphia, Feb. 22, 1852. 

Robert Riddle 4 (2), second son of William 3 (1), was born in Phila- 
delphia, Penn., Feb. 3, 1854. 

Darnel Riddle 4 (1), third son of William 3 (1), was born in Philadel- 
phia, Penn., in 1858; unmarried. 

Caroline Riddle 4 (2), second daughter of William 3 (1), was born in 
Philadelphia, Penn., in 1859 ; unmarried. 

William Riddle 4 (3), fourth son of William 3 (1), was born in Phila- 
delphia, Penn., and is now connected with a local telegraph company 
in his native city. He has provided data for this book. 



ANOTHER FAMILY. 



William Riddle' 2 (4), was a native of Newton-Stewart, in County Ty- 
rone, Ireland, and a connection of the preceding family; but the degree 
of kinship is not known. He was born about 1790 ; married Jane Wiley, 
came to New York in 1834, and settled in Philadelphia in 1835. He re- 
moved to Sudbury ville, Chester County, Penn., in 1836. His wife "a 
woman of faithfulness." Shoemaker by trade. Had issue eight children, 
all born in Ireland, of whom hereafter. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

James Riddle 3 (1), eldest son of William 2 (4), was born at Newton- 
Stewart, Ireland, in 1810 ; came to America in 1838, educated himself for 
a teacher, and became assistant principal of a high school. He died in 
1843. Was twice married; second wife died of yellow fever at Galves- 
ton, Tex., in T854. Household property destroyed by fire in 1855. Had 
issue six children, two of whom were living in 1873. 

Robert Riddle 3 (3), a son of William' 2 (4), was born at Newton-Stew- 
art, Ireland, about the year 1826 ; came to the United States in 1834, and 
became one of the greatest and most wealthy flour merchants in Philadel- 
phia. He removed to Lambertville, N. J., and died there in 1873, only a 
few months after leaving Philadelphia. His place of business, for many 



180 BIDDELLS OF CASTLEFINX. IRELAND. 



years, was at the corner of Vine and Broad Streets. I have no account 
of a family. 

Christopher Riddle 3 (3), a son of William' 2 (4), was born at Newton- 
Stewart, Ireland, in ls2s, and came to the United States with his parents 
when a child. He was apprenticed to learn the common painter's trade, 
but not being satisfied with that business, learned the art of graining in 
imitation of fancy woods and marble, and has been a success. He has 
also applied himself to the study of oratory, and sometimes receives the 
meed of praise for speaking in public. He has been twice married, and 
has a family of five children. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Jonathan Riddle 4 (1), a son of James 3 (1), is a merchant in Galves- 
ton, Tex., about 35 years of age. , 



RIDDELLS OF CASTLEFINN, IRELAND. 

[Pennsylvania Branch.] 

Thomas Riddell 1 (1), was a relative of the ancestors of the "Riddells 
of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania,''' and of the "Riddells of Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania." He was engaged in business at Mar, Castlefinn, 
County Donegal, Ireland, but was not successful, and having failed, soon 
died, leaving a widow and four children in destitute circumstances; these, 
at the solicitation of relatives, came to America in 1772, and for a time 
made their abode in Baltimore, Md. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

John Riddell" (1), eldest son of Thomas 1 (1), was born at Mar, Castle- 
finn, County Donegal, Ireland, in 1756; came to Baltimore, Md., with his 
mother and brother in 1772, and lived for some years in Baltimore. He 
subsequently engaged in business at Philadelphia, Penu., and continued 
there till his death. He became financially independent. Had issue four 
children, of whom hereafter, and died about 1850. Mr. Riddell was well 
known in business circles as an honest man, and substantial, respectable 
citizen. 

Eleanor Riddell' 2 (1), a daughter of Thomas 1 (1), was born at Mar, 
Castlefinn, County Donegal, Ireland, in 1760 ; came to Baltimore, Md., in 
1772; was married to a Mr. Alcern, and reared a family. Residence un- 
known. 

Elizabeth Riddell' 2 (1), second daughter of Thomas 1 (1), was born at 
Mar, Castlefinn, County Donegal, Ireland, in 1765; came to Baltimore 
with her mother in 1772, and is said by some to have died single, by others 
to have had a family. 

Hon. James Riddell' 2 (1), a son of Thomas 1 (1), was' born at Mar, 
Castlefinn, County Donegal, Ireland, Nov. 15, 1770; came to the United 
States in 1772, and lived with his mother and brother at Baltimore for 
several years ; he subsequently removed to Pittsburgh, Penn., engaged in 
merchandizing, and made that city his permanent residence. He was a 
shoemaker by trade. Was successful in business and acquired a fortune. 
Received the appointment of Associate Judge of the Court of Common 



BIDDELLS OF (JASTLEFINN, IEELAND. 181 

Pleas, and served in other positions of responsibility. He married a lady 
in Baltimore, also from Ireland, named Jane Adams, and had issue nine 
children, of whom hereafter. He died in 1854, aged 84 years. Mr. Rid- 
dell became acquainted with another branch of the same stock in Pitts- 
burgh, and at their solicitation changed his surname from "Riddell" to 
" Riddle," a change which very much displeased his mother, but her impor- 
tunities were not of sufficient force to cause him to return to his original 
name, he having acquired property as James Riddle. He was a man of 
sound mind and active, progressive habits, of large business capabilities, 
and great force of character. He was highly respected. Mr. Riddle 
probably had two wives, as the mother of Capt. Thomas Riddle, — his son, 
— was called "Elizabeth-Sin Riddle" in the records. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Capt. Thomas Riddle 3 (2), eldest son of James 2 (1) and Elizabeth- 
Sin Riddle, was born in Shippingsburgh, Penn. (Cumberland County), 

Oct. 17, 1795; married Charlotta, daughter of and Elizabeth Guth- 

ridge (she was born in Newport, Isle of Wight, Eng., July 23, 1806, 
where she lived until her marriage), April 16, 1826, and had issue ten 
children, of whom hereafter. At the age of seventeen he went to sea as 
a common sailor before the mast, and by his energy and strict attention 
to his business, worked himself to the position of commander. He was 
master of several merchant-vessels sailing between Philadelphia, Europe, 
and China. The last vessel he commanded in the China trade, was the 
"North America," making the last trip on the year of his marriage, when 
he quit the sea, going to Pittsburgh, Penn., where he took command of the 
steamboat " Neptune," plying between that city and New Orleans, it tak- 
ing three months at that time to make the round trip. He located his 
family at Covington, Ky., and after three years' service on the "Neptune," 
removed to Cincinnati, 0., and engaged in merchandizing for a year ; 
thence he removed to New Albany, Ind., where he permanently located 
with his family in 1832, and again went on the river, taking command of 
a steamboat in the Louisville and New Orleans trade. He afterwards 
commanded the United States snag-boat "Hercules," in which he con- 
tinued until the war with Mexico, when he took command of the U. S. 
transport, iron steamer, "Maria Burt," carrying troops from New Orleans 
to Vera Cruz. After the close of the war he built the steamboat " Ann 
Livington," and run her in the Louisville and southern coast trade for 
several years, when she was burned and became a total wreck. Captain 
Riddle died of cholera July 13, 1855, aged 57 years. He was a man of 
firm intellect and high social standing, and a very successful commander. 
He was six feet and three inches high, with an average weight of one 
hundred and ninety pounds, standing very erect ; his complexion was dark. 

John Riddle 3 (2), second son of James 2 (1), was born in Pittsburgh, 
Penn., Nov. 21, 1799; married, and had issue two sons, of whom here- 
after. He resided in Philadelphia; died April 9, 1855. Was a wealthy 
man. 

Elizabeth Riddle 3 (2), eldest daughter of James 2 (1), was born in 
Pittsburgh, Penn., Feb. 20, 1798; was married to Mr. M. Mason, an Eng- 
lishman, dry goods merchant ; secondly, to Dr. Joseph Gazzain. 

James-S. Riddle 3 (2), third son of James 2 (1), was born in Pitts- 
burgh, Penn., March 29, 1804; married , and had issue four children, 

of whom hereafter. He lived at or near Pittsburgh. 



182 BIDDELLS OF CASTLEFINN, IRELAND. 

Mary-Ann Riddle 3 (1), second daughter of James 2 (1), was born in 
Pittsburgh, Penn., in 1800, and died young. 

Mary-Anil Riddle 3 (2), third daughter of James 2 (1), was born in 
Pittsburgh, Penn., March 13, 1806; was married to Judge Charles Shaler, 
of Pittsburgh, and left issue. 

Eleanor Riddle 3 (2), fourth daughter of James 2 (1). was born in 
Pittsburgh, Penn., Sept. 24, 1808; was married to Henry Forsyth, and 
died Jan. 20, 1853, leaving issue. 

William Riddle 3 (1), fourth son of James 2 (1), was born in Pitts- 
burgh, Penn., Oct. 8, 1810; married in 1835, to Mary Lawrence, of Louis- 
ville, Ky., and had issue nine children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddle 
was a merchant, in the city of Louisville, and acquired wealth. Know- 
ing that his father had changed his name from "Riddell" to "Riddle," he 
instructed his own children to spell their names Riddell. He died Dec. 13, 
1855. He was a man of excellent ability, and highly esteemed by a large 
circle of friends. 

Robert-Moore Riddle 3 (1), fifth son of James 2 (1), was born in Pitts- 
burgh, Penn., Aug. 17, 1812; married a Miss Piers, of Pittsburgh, and 
had issue t /?ye children, of whom hereafter. He died Dec. 18, 1858, aged 
46 years. Mr. Riddle was one of the most experienced editors in the 
city. In 1837 he became proprietor and editor of the old Presbyterian 
Advocate, but during the administration of General Harrison, he relin- 
quished the publication of that journal to become postmaster, to which 
position he was appointed by the President. About the close of Mr. Ty- 
ler's term of office, he purchased of J. Heron Foster, the Spirit of the 
Age, and soon after merged it into the Press, now known as the Com- 
mercial Journal. To this paper he Avas constantly attached, as proprie- 
tor and active manager, until a short time before his death, when owing 
to failing health, his connection with that paper was discontinued. In 
1853, he was elected by the Whig party as mayor of the city of Pitts- 
burgh, which post he filled one term, with credit to himself and with ben- 
efit to the city, at the same time fulfilling his onerous duties as conductor 
of the aforesaid journal. As an editor he was accomplished and success- 
ful; although not ranking as a very profound reasoner, he was a most bril- 
liant and instructive writer, and the emanations from his pen have been 
generally admired In person he was tall, slender, and of dignified pres- 
ence ; and in manner affable, courteous, and sociable, — interesting in con- 
versation and a pleasant companion. 

Charles Riddle 3 (1), youngest son of James 2 (1) was born in Pitts- 
burgh, Penn., March 10, 1815, and died at New Orleans, La., Feb. 12, 
1853, unmarried. He was a clerk. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Elizabeth-Sin Riddle 4 (3), eldest daughter of Thomas'' (2), was born 
in Allegheny County, Penn., Feb. 25, L827 ; died April 16, 1828. 

George-William Riddle 4 (1), eldest son of Thomas 3 (2), was born in 
Covington, Ky., July 11, 1828, and died Aug. 2, 1830. 

Samuel Riddle 4 (1), second son of Thomas'' (2), was born in Coving- 
ton, Ky., Dec. 11, 1829, and died at New Albany, Ind., May 17, 1854. 

Ann-Livingtoil Riddle 4 (1 ). second daughter of Thomas 1 ' (2), was born 
in Cincinnati, O., Jan. 29, 1832, and died at Hartland, Mich., April 5, 1862. 
She was married May 29, 1855, to Reuben C. Chambers, who with two 
children survives her. 



BIDDELLS OF GAUTLEFINN, IRELAND. 183 

Thomas-Fraiiklyn Riddle 4 (3), third son of Thomas 3 (2), was born 
in New Albany, Ind., Oct. 23, 1834, and died in Mobile, Ala., July 12, 
1863. He was married to Lizzie Beckler, in Mobile, Ala., Sept. 3, 1860. 
His wife and one child died a few months after him. 

Charlotta Riddle 4 (1), third daughter of Thomas 3 (2), was born in 
New Albany, Ind., April 14, 1838; was married to William-Woodruff 
Tuley, July 24, 1856, and has but one child. 

Jane Riddle 4 (1), fourth daughter of Thomas 3 (2), was born in New 
Albany, Ind., April 24, 1839, and died July 1, 1841. 

Charles- Van-Dnsen Riddle 4 (2), fourth son of Thomas 8 (2), was born 
in New Albany, Ind., July 24, 1841 ; married Emma A. Williams, in 
New Orleans, La., April 15, 1862, and died of yellow fever at Synder's 
Bluff, on Yazo River, twelve miles above Vicksburg, Miss., during the 
epidemic of 1878. His wife and three children are living in New Orleans; 
the two others died of yellow fever within a few days of their father. 

William- Wray Riddle 4 (2), fifth son of Thomas 3 (2), was born in New 
Albany, Ind., May 19, 1843; married Miss Minnie Ferris, of Paoli, Ind., 
and had issue two children. His wife died in 1881, and he married to Miss 
Sue Bollman, of Pittsburgh, Penn., by whom he has one son, of whom 
hereafter. 

Mary Riddle 4 (2), fifth daughter of Thomas 3 (2), was born in New 
Albany, Ind., May 14, 1846 ; was married to Henry T. Kerlin, Dec. 4, 1883, 
and is now living in Louisville, Ky. 



Johll-S. Riddle 4 (3), eldest son of John 3 (2), was born at Philadel- 
phia, Penn. ; married Miss McClure, of Pittsburgh, and died leaving one 
son, of whom hereafter. 

James Riddle 4 (2), second son of John 3 (2), died unmarried. 



Robert-Moore Riddle 4 (2), eldest son of William 3 (1), was born in 
Louisville, Ky., March 30, 1837, and died June 27, 1838. 

Benjamin-Lawrence Riddle 4 (1), second son of William 3 (1), was 
born in Louisville, Ky., May 23, 1839, and died August 2, 1840. 

Leaven-Lawrence Riddle 4 (1), third son of William 3 (1), was born 
in Louisville, Ky., April 23, 1841; died Aug. 24, 1842. 

William Riddle 4 (3), fourth son of William 3 (1), was born in Louis- 
ville, Ky., Dec. 29, 1842; died Jan. 30. 1843. 

Mary-Lawrence Riddle 4 (4), eldest daughter of William 3 (1), was 
born in Louisville, Ky., April 17, 1845; was married to Clarence Joyes, 
Aug. 11, 1868, and died Oct. 25, 1876. 

William Riddle 4 (4), fifth son of William 3 (1), was born in Louisville, 
Ky., Aug. 2, 1848 ; married Mollie Claxton, Oct. 8, 1874, and has issue 
two children, of whom hereafter. Farmer in Owen County, Ky. 

Elias-Dorsey Riddle 4 (1), sixth son of William 3 (1), was born in 
Louisville, Ky., Jan. 31, 1851, and in 1873 was a clerk for Peter Wright 
and Sons, Philadelphia, Penn. 

Charles-Lawrence Riddle 4 (3), seventh son of William 3 (1), was born 
in Louisville, Ky., April 22, 1853. Farmer in Owen County, Ky. Mar- 
ried Laura S. Ross, of Jefferson County, Ky., and has issue three children, 
of whom hereafter. 

Benjamin-Howard Riddle 4 (2), eight son of William 3 (1), was born 
n Louisville, Ky., July 16, 1855 ; died^Nov. 11, 1855. 



184 BID DELLS OF CASTLE FINN, IRELAND. 

Col. William Kiddle 4 (5), eldest son of Robert 3 (1), was on the staff 
of General Mead during the Rebellion, and was shot in a political alter- 
cation in a saloon in Philadelphia, about 1868. 

John-SilllS Riddle 4 (4), a son of Robert 3 (1), was born in Pittsburgh, 
Penn., married Mary, daughter of John-Bradford Wallace and Mary Bin- 
ney, his wife, and sister of Hon. John-William Wallace, President of the 
Pennsylvania Historical Society. He resided at Erie. Had issue three 
children, of whom hereafter. Buried in St. Peter's church-yard, Philadel- 
phia, April 14, 1855, a<jed 54 years ; his wife was born Dec. 10, 1810, and 
died May 13, 1852. 

Robert Riddle 4 (3), a son of Robert 3 (1), was born in Pittsburgh, Penn., 

Anilie-D. Riddle 4 (1), a daughter of Robert 3 (1), was born in Pitts- 
burgh, Penn.; was married to Col. Thomas A. Scott, President of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad, and resides in Philadelphia.* 

Bessie Riddle 4 (1), youngest daughter of Robert 3 (1), was born in 
Pittsburgh, Penn. and was married to John-Harmon Fisher, of Philadel- 
phia. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

Ann-Livington Riddle 5 (2). 
Mary Riddle 5 (5). 

Emma Riddle 5 (1). i- Children of Charles 4 (2). 

Lotta Riddle 5 (1). 

Thomas Riddle 5 (4). . I 



Wray-T. Riddle 5 (1), eldest son of William 4 (2). 
Irene Riddle 5 (1), eldest daughter of William 4 (2). 
William Riddle 5 (6), second son of William 4 (2). 



Elias-Lawrence Riddle 5 (1), eldest son of William 4 (4), was born in 
Owen County, Ky., July 2, 1878. 

Nellie-H. Riddle 5 (1), eldest daughter of William 4 (4), was born in 
Owen County, Ky., Aug. 22, 1881. 

Mary-L. Riddle 5 (6), eldest daughter of Charles 4 (3), was born in 
1873, somewhere in Kentuckv. 

Charles Riddle 5 (4), eldest son of Charles 4 (3), was born in 1877, 
somewhere in Kentucky. 

ROSS Riddle 5 (1), second son of Charles 4 (3), was born in 1881, some- 
where in Kentuckv. 



John- Wallace Riddle 5 (5), eldest son of John 4 (4), and his wife, Mary 
Wallace, was born Nov. 3, 1838, and died in the city of Philadelphia, Nov. 
26, 1863, a promising and educated young man. 

James Riddle 5 (3), second son of John 4 (4), was born Dec. 18, 1840, 
and died in Philadelphia, May, 30, 1861. 

Susan-Bradford-Wallace Riddle 5 (3), a daughter of John 4 (4), was 
born, Sept. 20, 1844, and died May 3, 1852. 

* Col. Scott was a very distinguished and wealthy man. and was sometimes called 
the great Pennsylvania "Railroad King." Deceased. Mrs. Scott is a lady of ami- 
able qualities, possessing a cultivated mind and great kindness of heart. She has 
traveled extensively in Europe. 



RIDDELLS OF BALLYBLACK, IRELAND. 185 

RIDDELLS OF BALLYBLACK, IRELAND. 

[Pennsylvania Branch.] 

John Riddell 1 (1), descended from a Scottisli stock, lived at Bally- 
black, County of Down, province of Ulster, Ireland. He was born about 
1740; married Margaret Moore, of Scottish descent, and had issue seven 
children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddell 1 s ancestors came from Scot- 
land to Ireland previous to 1620. An effort was made to trace the an- 
cestry of this family, but as the parish registers of Ballyblack have been 
destroyed, connections cannot be made. They spelled the name Riddell. 
Mr. Riddell died in 1806, and his widow Feb. 1, 1816; they were buried 
at Ballyblack. 

Matthew Riddell 1 (1), brother of the preceding, was born at Bally- 
black, County of Down, province of Ulster, Ireland, in 1743; came to the 
County of Westmoreland, Penn. ; thence in 1796 to Venango County, 
where he settled permanently. He married Elizabeth Gilkey, a native of 
Ireland (she was born in 1753, and died Nov. 26, 1817), and had issue 
four children, of whom hereafter. He died Nov. 26, 1830. 

Ann Riddell 1 (1), sister of the preceding (parents' names unknown), 
was born at Ballyblack, County of Down, Ireland, and is supposed to have 
died there. Her name, with that of a sister, was found in a letter written 
from Ireland by her brother's wife. 

Mary Riddell 1 (1), sister of the preceding, was born at Ballyblack, Ire- 
land, and is supposed to have lived and died there; probably her descend- 
ants may be living there. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Matthew Riddle' 2 (2), a son of John 1 (1), was born at Ballyblack, 
County of Down, Ireland; married Sarah Findlay,* and had issue nine 
children, of whom hereafter, — all born in Ireland. After the decease of 
his wife he followed his kindred to the United States (1824), and settled 
at Howard, Centre County, Penn., where he died in 1850. 

William Riddle' 2 (1), son of John 1 (1), was born in Ballyblack, Coun- 
ty of Down, Ireland ; married Sarah Brittan, and had issue seven children, 
of whom hereafter. He came to America, and settled at Bellefonte, Cen- 
tre County, Penn., previous to the Irish Rebellion (1796-8). He was a 
stone-mason by trade. 

Hugh Riddle' 2 (1), a son of John 1 (1), was born at Ballyblack, Coun- 
ty of Down, Ireland, Aug. 1, 1779; married Sept. 1, 1814, to Miss Re- 
becca Lee, and had issue nine children, of whom hereafter. He came to 
the United States about the time of the Irish Rebellion (1796-8), and 
lived awhile with his brother, before mentioned, at Bellefont ; while there 
he went to Wilmington, Del., after his baggage, and their being no public 
conveyances, nor bridges across the streams at that time, he started for 
the Susquehanna on horseback, and reached Clark's Ferry where the river 
was a mile wide. Having recently crossed the ocean, the distance over 
the Susquehanna seemed insignificant, and urging his horse forward he 
entered the stream; the current was strong, and horse and rider were 
swept down river, till, fortunately, the horse rested upon a large rock 

* Her brother, William Findlay, lived in the County of Down, and his daughter 
was wife of Rev. William Mitchell, the Presbyterian minister of Ballyblack 
church, in 1878. 



186 JIIDDELLS OF BALLYBLACK, IRELAND. 

that was l>ut a few feet below the surface. After resting awhile he pushed 
forward again, and by a desperate struggle succeeded in reaching the 
shore, where he found several persons who had been watching him in his 
perilous adventure, expecting to see him drowned. He was carried down 
the river more than a mile. An account of this undertaking was pub- 
lished in the newspapers at the time, and it has ever since been regarded 
as a feat accomplished by no other man. He removed from Bellefonte to 
Scrubgrass, in Venango County, where he remained nine years ; thence 
returned to Centre County, where he was employed for many years as 
superintendent of the iron-works of Roland Curtin, father of Governor 
Curt in. He purchased land and followed farming in Centre County until 
1 v -!4, when he removed to Clearfield County, where he died March '2'2, 
1856. He was an exemplary citizen, and for many years a devoted mem- 
ber of the Methodist church, highly respected for his sincere piety. 

John Riddle' 2 (2), a son of John 1 (1), was born at Ballyblack, County 
Down, Ireland, and died there when young. 

James Riddle' 2 (1), a son of John 1 (1), was born at Ballyblack, Ire- 
land, and died there. Supposed to have been poisoned by a young woman. 

Elizabeth Riddle' 2 (1), a daughter of John 1 (1), was born at Bally- 
black, Ireland : was married to Samuel Ewart ; had eight children, and 
died in her native country.* 

Margaret Riddle' 2 (1), a daughter of John 1 (1), was born in Bally- 
black, County of Down, Ireland ; was married to James Conn, and lived 
in Scotland, where her descendants reside. 

Agnes Riddle' 2 (1), a daughter of John 1 (1), was born in Ballyblack, 
County of Down, Ireland; was married to Thomas Kenney, and her de- 
scendants are living in Scotland and Ireland. 



Ann Riddle' 2 (1), eldest daughter of Matthew 1 (1), was born in West- 
moreland County, Penn., March 6, 1783 ; was married Jan. 23, 1810, to 
James Pollock, a man of Scottish descent, and had issue six sons and one 
daughter. She died Feb. 1, 1864, aged 79 years. 

John Riddle' 2 (3), eldest' son of Matthew 1 (1), was born in Westmore- 
land County, Perm., March 10, 1786; married July 20, 1813, to Esther 
Crawford (she was born April 24, 1790, and died March 10, 1877), and 
had issue six children, of whom hereafter. Farmer; died Feb. 9, 1826. 

Elizabeth Riddle' 2 (2), second daughter of Matthew 1 (1), was born in 
Westmoreland County, Penn., June 26, 1784, and died July 30, 1873, aged 
89 years. Never married. 

Robert Riddle' 2 (1), second son of Matthew 1 (1), was born in West- 
moreland County, Penn., Feb. 21, 1788; married Feb. 4, 1*17, to Cathe- 
rine Phipps, and had issue ten children, of whom hereafter. Farmer; 
died Sept. 18, 1856, aged 68 years, leaving a widow who is still living. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

William Riddle 3 (2), eldest son of Matthew' 2 (2), was born at Bally- 

* Her children were John, Samuel, Alexander, William, Margaret, Elizabeth, 
Mary, and Susanna. John Ewart is still (1880) living in Ballyblack, Ireland, with- 
out issue. Samuel died without issue. Susanna was married to Charles Robinson, 
and left surviving children, Charles and Eliza-Jane (my correspondent i, who was 
married to Mr. Mc Williams. Elizabeth was married to John McColloch, and is still 
living, with issue. Margaret was married to John Montgomery, who after her 
decease, went to America with his family. William (sometime dead) left issue 
three sons and one daughter, still alive. 



RIDDELLS OF BALLYBLACK, IRELAND. 187 



black, County of Down, Ireland, March 6, 1797; married in 1829, to 
Isabella T. Pemberton, of Pennsylvania, and had issue several children, 
of whom hereafter. He died in June, 1861, aged 64 years ; his widow 
died in 1865, aged 64 years, in the State of Pennsylvania. 

J oil ii Riddle 3 (4), second son of Matthew' 2 (2), was born in Ballyblack, 
County of Down, Ireland, about 1800 ; came to Pennsylvania with his 
father in 1824, thence went to Texas with his brother Wilson, where, in 
1842, he was taken prisoner and confined in Castle Perote, where he re- 
mained ten months, but was finally released as a subject of Great Britain, 
through Her Majesty's Minister, Peckenham. In 1846 he crossed into 
Mexico on a trading expedition and was again made a prisoner, but 
effected his escape two months subsequently. He suffered great depriva- 
tion during his imprisonment, which seriously impaired his health ; he 
died in June, 1858. Never married. 

James Riddle 3 (2), a son of Matthew 2 (2), was born at Ballyblack, 
County of Down, Ireland ; came to America in 1824, and died unmarried 
when a young man. 

Wilson Riddle 3 (1), a son of Matthew 2 (2), was born at Ballyblack, 
County of Down, Ireland, in 1808 ; married in 1841, to Miss E. M. 
Menesce, and had issue two children, of whom hereafter. He resided for 
several years at Howard, Centre County, Penn., and from there removed 
to Tennessee, and engaged in mercantile pursuits in the city of Nashville. 
In 1839 he removed to, and established a mercantile house in San Antonia 
de Bexas. As a merchant he was successful until the year 1842, when he 
was robbed of his entire personal property by an invading force from the 
Republic of Mexico, under command of General Vasquez. On the 11th 
day of September, 1842, he was taken prisoner by the Mexican General 
Wall, in the city of San Antonia, carried to Mexico, and confined (as also 
his brother John) in Castle Perote, where he remained ten months, and 
through the influence of the British Minister he was released as a subject 
of Great Britain. His confinement, deprivations, and sufferings, endured 
in prison, impaired his health, and terminated his life Sept. 12^ 1847. 

Margaret Riddle 3 (4), daughter of Matthew 2 (2), was born at Bally- 
black, Ireland ; was married to Thomas Beck, and after his death came 
with her family to Pennsylvania, in 1844. 

Anna Riddle 3 (1), second daughter of Matthew 2 (2), was born in 
Ballyblack, Ireland ; married, and was living near Bellefonte, Penn., in 
1879. 

Mary Riddle 3 (3), third daughter of Matthew 2 (2), was born at Bally- 
black, Ireland ; came to America in 1824 ; was married to Thomas Moore, 
and lives in Centre County, Penn. 

Sarah Riddle 3 (1), fourth daughter of Matthew 2 (2), was born at 
Ballyblack, Ireland; came to America in 1824; was married to J. H. 
McClure, and lived in Centre County, Penn. 

Eliza Riddle 3 (1) fifth daughter of Matthew 2 (2), was born at Bally- 
black, Ireland; came to America in 1824; was married to a Mr. Tipton, 
and deceased previous to 1879. 

Betsey Riddle 3 (1), a daughter of William 2 (1), was born at Bellefonte, 
Centre County, Penn. ; was married to John Robinson. 

Margaret Riddle 3 (2), a daughter of William 2 (1), was born at Belle- 
fonte, Centre County, Penn. ; was married to Perry, and lives at Prai- 
rie Home, 111. 



188 BIDDELLS OF BALLYBLACK, IBELAND. 



Hllgh-M. Riddle 3 (2), eldest son of William 2 (1), was born at Belle- 
fonte, Centre County, Penn., and died young in 1831. 

William Riddle' 3 (3), second son of William- (1), was born at Belle- 
fonte, Centre County, Penn., Aug. 9, 1806 ; married Margaret Sweeny; 
secondly, Agnes P. Taylor, and had issue three children, of whom here- 
after. Resided in his native town. Farmer ; died Oct. 8, 1879. 

Nancy Riddle 3 (1), a daughter of William- (1), was born at Bellefonte, 
Centre County, Penn.; was married to John Neil ; both dead. 

Johll-S. Riddle 3 (5), third son of William 2 (1), was born on the old 
Riddle farm, at the foot of the Nittany mountains, in Centre County, 
Penn., March 6, 1810, where he lived until three years after his marriage in 
1836, to Jane Moony (she was born at Boulsburg, Centre County, Nov. 29, 
1818), when he settled in Armstrong County, where he has lived ever 
since ; the town is now called Strattonville. He is a farmer. Had issue 
eight children, of whom hereafter. 

Matthew Riddle 3 (3), second son of William 2 (1), was born at Belle- 
fonte, Centre County, Penn., in 1813 ; married Eliza A. Baird,and had issue 

children, of whom hereafter. He had removed to Illinois. Farmer ; 

killed (accidentally) in Kansas, April 11, 1878; family living near Hutch 
inson, Kansas. 

Johll-M. Riddle 3 (6), eldest son of Hugh 2 (1), was born in Centre 
County, Penn., June 27, 1815; married May 24, 1842, to Charlotte E. 
Havens, and had issue nine children, of whom hereafter. He resides at 
New Washington, in his native State. Presumably a farmer ; has fur- 
nished materials for this book ; a man of sound mind and good business 
capacity. 

William Riddle 3 (4), second son of Hugh 2 (1), was born in Centre 
County, Penn., March 7, 1817; emigrated to Illinois in 1841, and died 
there of brain fever in 1844. Carpenter by trade; no issue. 

Mary-L. Riddle 3 (2), eldest daughter of Hugh 2 (1), was born in Cen- 
tre County, Penn., March 19, 1819; was married to John Rorabaugh, 
and died June 24, 1871. She was a devoted member of the Methodist 
church. 

James Riddle 3 (3), third son of Hugh 2 (1), was born in Centre 
County, Penn., July 11, 1821; married March 14, 1843, to Margaret Foul- 
ton, and had issue seven children, of whom hereafter. He resides on a 
farm at New Washington, Clearfield County, Penn. 

Margaret Riddle 3 (3), second daughter of Hugh 2 (1), was born in 
Centre County, Penn , in March, 1824, and died Jan. 8, 1831, of scarlet fever. 

Wilson Riddle 3 (2), fourth son of Huglr(l), was born in Clearfield 
County, Penn., in September, 1826, and died Jan. 5, 1831, of scarlet fever. 

Harriet Riddle 3 (1), third daughter of Hugh 2 (1), was born in Clear- 
field County, Penn., in June, 1828,' and died Jan. 9, 1831, of scarlet fever. 

Hugh Riddle 3 (3), fifth son of Hugh 2 (1), was born in Clearfield 
County, Penn., Jan. 20, 1830; married in December, 1855, to Sarah J. 
Filburv, and had issue two sons, of whom hereafter Carpenter; died 
Feb. 14, 1865. 

Elizabeth Riddle 3 (3), fourth daughter of Hugh 2 (1), was born in Clear- 
field County, Penn., Aug. 4, 1834, and died April 16, 1850; unmarried. 

Matthew Riddle 3 (4), eldest son of John 2 (3), was born in Venango 
County, Penn., May 14, 1814; married Mary Moore, Sept. 5,1839 (she 



BIDDELLS OF BALLYBLAGK, IBELAND. 189 

was born June 5, 1820, and died Aug. 20, 1883), and had issue six chil- 
dren, of whom hereafter. Farmer bv occupation ; resided at Clintonville, 
Penn.; died Dec. 11, 1881. 

Jollll-W. Riddle 3 (7), second son of John 2 (3), was born in Venango 
County, Penn., Dec. 17, 1817; married Dec. 26, 1843, to Jane McCay 
(she was born May 6, 1819, and died Oct. 18, 1870), and had issue five 
children, of whom hereafter. He resides at Clintonville, Venango County, 
Penn., and carries on a farm. 

William-Clark Riddle 3 (5), third son of John 2 (3), was born in Ven- 
ango county, Penn. ; married, and has issue children, of whom here- 
after. He resides in his native county. 

Elizabeth Riddle 3 (4), only daughter of John 2 (3), was born in Ven- 
ango County, Penn.; was married to Moore, and lives at Big Bend, 

in her native County. 

Jolin-P. Riddle 3 (8), eldest son of Robert 2 (1), was born in Venango 
County, Penn. 

James-P. Riddle 3 (4), second son of Robert 2 (1), was born in Venango 
County, Penn. 

Elizabeth Riddle 3 (5), only daughter of Robert 2 (1), was born in 
Venango County, Penn. ; was married to Calvert, and lives at Clin- 
tonville, Penn. 

Matthew Riddle 3 (5), third son of Robert 2 (1), was born in Venango 
County, Penn. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Rev. Findlay-B. Riddle 4 (1), eldest son of William 3 (2), was born 
in Centre County, Penn., Dec. 3, 1829 ; married Mary, daughter of Samuel 
J. Paker, of Sunbury, and has issue five children, of whom hereafter. 
He was educated at Dickinson College, where he laid the foundation of 
his scholastic training, and then was a student at the Concord Biblical 
Institute, where he received important advantages in his theological 
studies. Entering the Baltimore Conference, in 1857, and becoming a 
member of the Central Pennsylvania Conference at its organization in 
1869, he has filled some of the most important appointments; among 
them, at Shamokin, Berwick, Altoona, Danville and Huntingdon. He is 
a rapid speaker, with a logical cast of mind, uses plain, practical lan- 
guage, and few excel him in debate. These elements of character have 
given him prominence in his conference. Recognizing his scholarly ac- 
quirements, Dickinson College honored him with the degree of A. M. 
See portrait in this book. 

James-F. Riddle 4 (5), second son of William 3 (2), was born in Cen- 
tre County, Penn., July 30, 1834; married Angeline Hughes, and is a 
lawyer practising at Tyrone. 

Nelsoil-P. Riddle 4 (1), third son of William 3 (2), was born in Centre 
County, Penn., Nov. 15, 1836 ; married Angeline Hughes, and has one 
child, of whom hereafter. 

Francis-M. Riddle 4 (2), a daughter of William 3 (2), was born in Cen- 
tre County, Penn., Sept. 5, 1841 ; unmarried. 

Mary-E. Riddle 4 (6), eldest daughter of William 3 (2), was born in 
Centre County, Penn., Aug. 25, 1831 ; unmarried. 

Matthew-M. Riddle 4 (6), fourth son of William 3 (2), was born in Cen- 
tre County, Penn., May 26, 1844; married Sarah C, daughter of George 



190 EIDDELLS OF BALLYBLACK, IRELAND. 

Long, and has issue two children, of whom hereafter. He served in the 
Union army in the Rebellion. 



Sarah-Elizabeth Riddle 4 (3), only daughter of Wilson 3 (1), was born 
at San Antonia, Texas, Feb. 19, l x 4i!: was married Sept. 18, 1866, tu 
Robert Eagar, of Nova Scotia, and has (with other issue) twin daughters; 
resides at San Antonia. 

JameS-Wil80il Riddle 4 (6), only son of Wilson 3 (1), was born at San 
Antonia, Texas, April 21, l s 45, and was single in 1873. At the age of 
sixteen he volunteered as a soldier in the Confederate army during the 
Rebellion, and served through the war; now (1*73) a merchant at Eagle 
Pass, Texas. 

Frank Riddle 4 (1), a son of John 3 (5), was born at Strattonville, Cen- 
tre County. Penn. ; married, and has two children, of whom hereafter ; 
he is a farmer at Strattonville. 

Sallie-E. Riddle 4 (1), eldest daughter of John 3 (5), was born at Strat- 
tonville, Penn. ; was married to J. H. Martin, and lives at Limestone, Cen- 
tre County. 

Amanda Riddle 4 (1). second 'laughter of John 8 (.">). was born at 
Strattonville, Penn. ; was married to S. K. Davis, undertaker, and resides 
at Hubbard, O. 

Lauretta Riddle 4 (1), third daughter of John 3 (5), was born at Strat- 
tonville, Penn. ; was married to J. W. Mcllhattan, and lives in Edenburg, 
Centre County, Post-office, Knox. 

Asenath Riddle 4 (1), fourth daughter of John 8 (5), was born at Strat- 
tonville, Penn.; was married to Earl D. Spear, and lives in Colorado. 

Riddle 4 (?), second son of John 3 (5), was born at Strattonville, 

Penn., and died young. 

Mary-Jane Riddle 4 (4), fifth daughter of John 3 (5), was born at 
Strattonville, Penn., and died April 8, 1883 ; she was a devoted Christian. 



Martlia-Arminda Riddle 4 (1), eldest daughter of John 3 (6), was born 
in Clearfield County, Penn., Dec. 22, l x 43, and died April 11. 1864. 

Sarah-C. Riddle 4 (2), second daughter of John 3 (6), was born in 
Clearfield County, Penn., May 1, 1846 ; was married Feb. 14, 1*66, to 
John E. Rorabaugh, and has issue. 

Hush Riddle" (5), eldest son of John 3 (6), was born in Clearfield 
County. Penn., July 9, 1848 ; died Aug. 11, 1849. 

Fillmore-vV. Riddle 4 (1), second son of John 3 (6i. was born in Clear- 
field County, Penn., April 23, 1852, and in l v 73 was unmarried; farmer. 

Thurzah-R. Riddle 4 (1), third daughter of John 3 (6b was bom in 
Clearfield County, Penn.. Feb. 7, 1855, and was not married in 1873. 

James-G. Riddle 4 (?)• third son of John 3 (6), was born in Clearfield 
County, Penn., March 26, l v .> : -ingle in 187c]. 



William-Wilson Riddle 4 (6). eldest son of James 3 (3), was born in 
Clearfield County, Penn., Jan. 20, 1845 ; enlisted in the Hundred-and-fifth 
Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, in September, 1861, and served in 
the Union army during the Rebellion, until May 31, 1862, when he was 
killed at the battle of Fair Oaks, in Virginia. 

Mary-E. Riddle 4 (5), second daughter of James 3 (3), was born in 
Clearfield County, Penn., Dec. 29. 1^40. and was married Sept. 1, 1870, 
to Charles C. Weaver. 



RIDDELLS OF BALLYBLACK, IRELAND. 191 

Hugh Riddle 4 (6), second son of James 3 (3), was born in Clearfield 
County, Penn., April 18, 1849; single in 1873. 

Rebecca Riddle 4 (1), third daughter of James 3 (3), was born in Clear- 
field County, Penn., Feb. 10, 185*2 ; was married June 18, 1871, to David 
G. Piper. 

David-A. Riddle 4 (2), third son of James 3 (3), was born in Clearfield 
County, Penn., June 4, 1855; single in 1873. 

Two children died in infancy unnamed, born Jan. 1, 1844, and Dec. 20, 
1857, respectively. 

William Riddle 4 (7), eldest son of Hugh 3 (3), was born in Clearfield 
County, Penn., Dec. 4, 1857 ; living. 

Newton Riddle 4 (1), second son of Hugh 3 (3) was born in Clearfield 
County, Penn., May, 1860, and died in 1865. 



Jlllia-Anu Riddle 4 (2), eldest daughter of Matthew 3 (4), was born in 
Clintonville, Penn., Oct. 17, 1840 ; was married to John Donaldson (car- 
penter), and has floe children. 

Josiah-Randolph Riddle 4 (1), eldest son of Matthew 3 (4), born in 
Clintonville, Penn., April 1, 1844; unmarried in 1880 ; artist, Topeka, Kan. 

Livili Riddle 4 (1), second daughter of Matthew 3 (4), was born in 
Clintonville, Penn., Feb. 10, 1846; was married to Joshua Huffman, and 
has four children. 

John-KllOX Riddle 4 (9), second son of Matthew 3 (4), was born in 
Clintonville, Penn., Jan. 29, 1848 ; single in 1880. 

Rev. Clinton Riddle 4 (1), third son of Matthew 3 (4), was born in Clin- 
tonville, Penn., Sept. 29, 1851 ; unmarried. He resided with his parents, 
working on the farm and attending the common school, until 'the spring 
of 1866. In the fall and winter of 1866 and 1867, he attended a select 
school in Clintonville, walking, — sometimes riding, — about three miles, 
aud returning home at noon to spend his afternoons in study and doing 
chores. In September, 1868, he went to Westminster College, located in 
Xew AVilmington, Lawrence County, Penn., and entering the second 
preparatory class, remained in that institution until he graduated in June, 
1873. During the summer of 1873, he was at home in charge of the 
farm ; in the autumn, taught for some time in the Andes Collegiate In- 
stitution, at Andes, Deleware County, N. Y. He entered the Theological 
Seminary at Newburgh, N. Y., Jan. 15, 1874; in 1875 was licensed to 
preach by the first United Presbyterian Presbytery of New York. He 
preached during his vacations until 1876, when he left the seminary, and 
after a period in Pennsylvania, went, in March, to Kansas, and spent two 
years as missionary in Kansas, Nebraska, and Missouri. On May 11, 1878, 
an unaminous call was given him at Walton, Kan., which he accepted, 
and received ordination the following September. Installed pastor of 
the United Presbyterian Church at Walton in April, 1879, and has been 
very successful, his congregation increasing rapidly. 

Mary-Esther Riddle 4 (7), eldest daughter of John 3 (7), was born at 
Clintonville, Penn., Oct. 18, 1844; was married Jan. 21, 1869, to Levi Wil- 
liams, and died Oct. 11, 1872, leaving issue. 

Charles-Milton Riddle 4 (1), eldest son of John 3 (7), was born at 
Clintonville, Penn., Feb. 14, 1846; married Feb. 28, 1872, to Emma- 
Florence Cross, and has issue two children, of whom hereafter; shoemaker 
by occupation ; lives at Clintonville. 



192 RIDDELLS OF DENMAMORA, IRELAND. 

William-McCay Riddle 4 (8), second son of John 3 (7), was born at 
Clintonville, Penn., May 15, 1849; married Jan. 20, 1874, to Jane-Adaline 
Rosenburgh, and has hco children ; farmer. 

Elizii-Allll Riddle 4 (2), second daughter of John 8 (7), was born in 
Clintonville, Penn , July 13, 1851 ; unmarried in 1880. 

Isabella-Jane Riddle 4 (1), third daughter of John 3 (7), was born in 
Clintonville, Penn., July 31, 1854; was married July 31, 1879, to Robert 
S. Thompson. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

Jeilllie-P. Riddle 5 (1), eldest daughter of Findlay 3 (1), was born Sept. 
1, 1862. 

Mary-P. Riddle 5 (8), second daughter of Findlay 3 (1), was born Mav 
27, 1865. 

William-E. Riddle 5 (9), eldest son of Findlay 3 (1), was born Feb. 13, 
1867. 

Rachel-B. Riddle 5 (2), third daughter of Findlav 3 (1), was born July 
3, 1869. 

Julia-D. Riddle 5 (3), fourth daughter of Findlav 3 (1), was born Sept. 
26, 1871. 

Mary-Belle Riddle 5 (9), a daughter of Nelson 3 (1), was born Aug. 

8. 1875. 



Susail-I. Riddle 5 (3), a daughter of Matthew 4 (6), was born Feb. 4, 

1872. 

Mary-E. Riddle 5 (10), second daughter of Matthew 4 (6), was born 
June 25, 1'875. 

Lotta Riddle 5 (1), a daughter of Charles 4 (1). { At Clinton- 

Bertha- Alice Riddle 5 (1), a daughter of Charles 4 (1). j ville, Penn. 



Eva-Jane Riddle 5 (1), a daughter of William 4 (8). } At Clintonville, 
Oliver-Herbert Riddle 5 (1), a son of William 4 (8). J Penn. 



RIDDELLS OF DENMAMORA, IRELAND. 

[United States Branch]. 

John Riddell 1 (1), parents unknown, emigrated from the County of 
Denmamora, Ireland, in the year 1832 ; his wife, Mary Simpson, and some 
of his children came with him. He was left without parents in Ireland, 
when a small boy, and entrusted to the care of his grandmother named Ban. 
He was the youngest son ; a paper-maker by trade ; had a brother Robert 
who was a surgeon in the army, and who died at New Orleans. Two 
brothers came to America, and were supposed to have lived in New York 
under assumed names.* 

* There were also two maiden-sisters in Philadelphia, whose names have not 
reached me. 



HIDDELLS OF BALLAYMEATH, IRELAND. 19 



o 



SECOND GENERATION. 

Rev. Walter Riddle' 2 (1), sometimes spelt Riddell, son of John 1 (1), 
was born in the County of Denmamora, Ireland ; came to the United 
States with his father in 1832. His birth was in 1822. He married in 
1844, to Jane Cadmus. He was a cabinet-maker by trade, but owing to 
poor health he gave attention to mercantile pursuits, which were success- 
fully carried forward to the time of his death, which occurred on Dec. 31, 
1859. Mr. Riddle was for many years earnestly devoted to the cause of 
Christ, laboring faithfully as an elder and local preacher in the Methodist 
Episcopal church ; he refrained from joining the ministers' conference on 
account of ill health. He was also an ardent supporter of the cause of 
temperance, and early connected himself with the Washingtonians ; he 
has delivered many very stirring addresses on the subject of temperance. 
All his spare hours were devoted to the advancement of the cause of 
Christ, the furtherance of the temperance movement, and the general good 
of his fellowmen. I copy some words from a letter written by his pastor 
soon after his death, which prove Jhe high estimation in which he was held 
by those who were intimately acquainted with him : — 

" His beautifully consistent Christian character and ardent piety, combined with 
a faith in the promises of God that never flagged, have, ever since I have known 
him, been a subject of my highest admiration. Such indeed was my feeling, that 
whenever I was with him I felt a stronger sense of security than anywhere else ; 
his presence was an impulse to my religious life. Oh, that I could have been with 
him when his last word was spoken, and have caught the last look from his sainted 
eyes !" 

Mr. Riddle passed away in the triumphs of the faith he had so long pos- 
sessed, leaving the blessed influence of life's pious example as a consolation 
to his family far more precious than gold that perishes. He left a widow 
and two children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddle is said to have had two 
sisters and one brother, but all are now dead. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Jennie Riddle 3 (1), a daughter of Walter' 2 (1), was born in the year 
1849, and married to Philip W. Hammond in 1875. 

Walter-W. Riddle 3 (2), eldest son of Walter 2 (1), was born in the 
year 1851, and is unmarried. He is connected with the Boonton Iron 
Works, in Boonton, N. J. He says in a letter to me, " As for myself and 
family (that is mother and sister) I am not ashamed to lay claim to a char- 
acter and reputation untarnished." His mother says of this son, " He is 
the soul of honor and truthfulness." 

Willie Riddle 3 (1), second son of Walter' 2 (1), was born in 1855, and 
some time ago passed away. 



RIDDELLS OF BALLAYMEATH, IRELAND. 

Hugh Riddel! 2 (2), a son of Hugh 1 (1) and Mary (Wilson) Riddell, 
was baptized in the parish of Ballaymeath, County Londonderry, Ireland, 
Oct. 16, 1631 ; married May 5, 1658, to Margery Campbell, and had issue 

* This family is closely connected with others whose history is given in this 
book, but the same Christian names occur so often that it is impossible to make 
connection in genealogy without more particulars than I have been able to find. 

13 



194 RIDDELLS OF BALLAYMEATH, IRELAND. 



seven children, five sons and two daughters, of whom hereafter. The 
parents are supposed to have come from Scotland, and were probably de- 
scended from the Riddells of Roxburghshire, as Walter Rid dell-Carre in- 
formed me of offshoots of that family who settled in Ireland at different 
times.* 

Robert Riddell 2 (1), second son of Hugh 1 (1) and Mary his wife, was 
baptized at Ballaymeath, Ireland, May 22, 1633; married Sept. 12, 1658, 
to Mary Henderson, and had issue eight children, of whom hereafter. 

Janet Riddell" (1), daughter of Hugh 1 (1) and Mary, his wife, was 
baptized at Ballaymeath, Ireland, April 4, 1635 ; and was married Aug. 
16, 1657, to James Wilson. 

James Riddell 2 (1), son of Hugh 1 (1) and Mary Wilson, was baptized 
May 10, 1637 ; married Dec. 4, 1658, to Elizabeth Maudit, and had issue 
five children (possibly others), four sons and a daughter, of whom here- 
"after. Mr. Riddell died Nov. 3, 1674. 

Andrew Riddell' 2 (1), son of Hugh 1 (1) and Mary Wilson, was bap- 
tized at Ballaymeath, Ireland, Aug. 2, 1639. 

John Riddell 2 (1), son of Hugh 1 (1) and Mary Wilson, was baptized 
at Ballaymeath, Ireland, Nov. 14, 1641 ; married June 4, 1670(?), to 
Janet Gordon, and had issue nine children, six sons and three daugh- 
ters, of whom hereafter. See " Riddells of Coleraine, Massachusetts," 
in this book. Mr. John Riddell died Jan. 3, 1737. I think Mr. Riddell 
must have married a second wife, as dates of births of children seem too 
late to be the issue of this union. Baptisms may not have been adminis- 
tered till children were some years of age. 

Mary Riddell 2 (1), daughter of Hugh 1 (1) and Mary Wilson, was bap- 
tized at Ballaymeath, Ireland, Jan. 24, 1642, and was married May 10, 
1659, to Alexander Wilson. 

Gavin Riddell 2 (1), son of Hugh 1 (1) and Mary Wilson, was baptized 
at Ballaymeath, Ireland, Sept. 20, 1644. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Hugh Riddell 3 (3), eldest son of Hugh- (2) and Margery Campbell, 
was baptized at Ballaymeath, Ireland, May 2, 1659 ; married June 3, 1681, 
to Janet Patten. 

Mary Riddell 3 (2), eldest daughter of Hugh- (2) and Margery Camp- 
bell, was baptized at Ballaymeath, Ireland, June 15, 1661, and was mar- 
ried May 15, 1677, to Alexander Wilson. 

Robert Riddell 3 (2), second son of Hugh' 2 (2) and Margery Campbell, 
was baptized at Ballaymeath, June 15, 1661, and died April 4, 1671. 

Ralph Riddell 3 (1), third son of Hugh- (2) and Margery Campbell, 
was baptized at Ballaymeath, Ireland, Aug. 1, 1663, and married Sept. 20, 
1678, to Elizabeth Howell. 

Janet Riddell 3 (2), second daughter of Hugh' 2 (2) and Margery Camp- 
bell, was baptized at Ballaymeath, Ireland, July 14, 1665, and was married 
Jan. 4, 1681, to James Gordon. 

John Riddell 3 (2), fourth son of Hugh 2 (2) and Margery Campbell, 



* Evidently this family furnished the ancestors of the Riddells and Riddles of 
Coleraine, Mass., and of Bedford, N. H., the history of whom see in this book. 
The names are identical, but dates do not agree with births and ages as recorded 
in the American family. There may have been mistakes in copying from original 
re con Is. 



BIDDELLS OF BALLAYMEATH, IB ELAND. 195 

was baptized at Ballayraeath, Ireland, Sept. 3, 1667, and married Dec. 15, 
1681, to Mary Cowan. 

Andrew Riddell 3 (2), fifth son of Hugh 2 (2) and Margery Campbell, 
was baptized at Ballaymeath, Ireland, May 20, 1669. 



Robert RiddelF (3), eldest son of Robert" 2 (2) and Mary Henderson, 
was baptized April 3, 1663; married Aug. 22, 1682, to Margaret Camp- 
bell. 

Hugh RiddelF (4), second son of Robert' 2 (1) and Mary, his wife, 
was baptized at Ballaymeath, Sept. 20, 1665, and married March 2, 1684, 
to Betsey Patten. 

John RiddelF (3), third son of Robert 2 (1) and Mary Henderson, 
was baptized at Ballaymeath, Nov. 4, 1667 ; married Aug. 2, 1702, Betsey 
Pate. 

Margaret RiddelF (1), fourth daughter of Robert 2 (1) and Mary 
Henderson, was baptized at Ballaymeath, June 23, 1669. 

James Riddell 3 (2), fourth son of Robert 2 (1) and Mary Henderson, 
was baptized at Ballaymeath, May 4, 1671. 

William Riddell 8 (1), fifth son of Robert 2 (1) and Mary Henderson, 
was baptized at Ballaymeath, Aug. 14, 1673, and married April 4, 1694, 
to Mary Campbell. 

Mary RiddelF (3), second daughter of Robert 2 (1) and Mary Hen- 
derson, was baptized at Ballaymeath, Sept. 4, 1675, and was married June 
10, 1691, to William Patterson. 

Alexander Riddell 3 (1), sixth son of Robert 2 (1) and Mary Hender- 
son, was baptized at Ballaymeath, Feb. 20, 1678 ; married May 16, 1696, 
to Katherine Henderson. 

Elizabeth RiddelF (1), third daughter of Robert 2 (1) and Mary Hen- 
derson, was baptized at Ballaymeath, April 4, 1680. 



Mary RiddelF (4), eldest daughter of James 2 (1) and Elizabeth Mau- 
dit, was baptized at Ballaymeath, Sept. 23, 1661 ; married Sept. 23, 1703, 
to Alexander Bell. 

James RiddelF (3), eldest son of James 2 (1) and Elizabeth Maudit, 
was baptized at Ballaymeath, Jan. 16, 1663. 

Robert RiddelF (5), second son of James 2 (1) and Elizabeth Maudit, 
was baptized at Ballaymeath, March 2, 1665. 

John RiddelF (4), third son of James 2 (1) and Elizabeth Maudit, was 
baptized at Ballaymeath, April 21, 1667. 

Elizabeth RiddelF (2), second daughter of James 2 (1) and Elizabeth 
Maudit, was baptized at Ballaymeath, Sept. 3, 1669. 

William RiddelF (2), fourth son of James 2 (1) and Elizabeth Maudit, 
was baptized at Ballaymeath, Dec. 16, 1672. 



John RiddelF (5), eldest son of John 2 (1) and Janet Gordon, was 
baptized at Ballaymeath, Oct. 18, 1686, and died Sept. 6, 1687. 

Gavill* Riddell 3 (2), second son of John 2 (1) and Janet Gordon, was 
baptized at Ballaymeath, May 16, 1688, and presumably emigrated to 
America, where he became the head of a numerous family. See " Rid- 
dells of Bedford, New Hampshire." 

* This name is common in Scotland and should be spelled Gavin ; it came to the 
Riddells from the Hamilton family. 



196 RIDDLES OF BALLTMONY, IRELAND. 

Mary Riddell 3 (5), eldest daughter of John- (1) and Janet Gordon, 
was baptized at Ballaymeath, Aug. 2, 1690. 

Hugh Riddell 3 (5), third son of John- (1) and Janet Gordon, was 
baptized at Ballaymeath, Sept. 20, 1692, and is supposed to have settled 
in Londonderry, X. H. See " Riddells of Coleraine, Massachusetts." 

James Riddell 3 (4), fourth son of John- (1) and Janet Gordon, was 
baptized at Ballaymeath, Dec. 3, 1695, and married Nov. 13, 1726, to Eliz- 
abeth Douglass. 

Robert Riddell 3 (6), fifth son of John- (1) and Janet Gordon, was 
baptized at Ballaymeath, March 14, 1698, and was probably one of the 
four brothers who settled in Xew England about the year 1718. See 
"Riddells of Coleraine, Massachusetts." 

John Riddell 3 (5), sixth son of John- (1) and Janet Gordon, was bap- 
tized at Ballaymeath, Jan. 2, 1701, and presumably came to Londonderry, 
X. E., with his brothers in 1718. See " Riddells "of Bedford, Xew Hamp- 
shire." 

Jauet Riddell 3 (3), second daughter of John- (1) and Janet Gordon, 
was baptized at Ballaymeath, Sept. 25, 1703, and was married April 6, 
17°1, to Thomas Hamilton. 

Margery Riddell 3 (2), third daughter of John- (1) and Janet Gordon, 
was baptized at Ballaymeath, Dec. 6, 1707, and married May 20, 1722, 
to John Clark. 

Samuel Riddell 3 (1), youngest son of John 2 (1) and Janet Gordon, 
was baptized at Ballaymeath, Oct. 4, 1710, and died Dec. 20, 1713.* 



RIDDLES OF BALLTMONY, IRELAND. 

[Pennsylvania Branch.] 

Robert Riddle 1 (1), allied to many other branches of the family of 
Scotch-Irish birth, lived on a farm in Ballymony, not far from the River 
Bann, County Antrim, Ireland ; came to Pennsylvania with his son in 
1835, and settled at Allegheny City, where he and wife died in 1840. He 
had issue several children, of whom hereafter. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

James Riddell" (1), a son of Robert 1 (1), was born in Ballymony, 
County Antrim, Ireland, and settled in Virginia many years ago. No 
particulars. 

Charles Riddell 2 (1), a son of Robert 1 (1), was born in Ballymony, 
County Antrim, Ireland ; married Elizabeth, 'laughter of John Dinsmore, 
in 1820, and had issue seven children, of whom hereafter. He bought a 
farm at Brady's Bend, about sixty miles above Pittsburgh, Penn., to 
which city he had emigrated in 1835, and died there in 1844. After Mr. 
Riddell' s death the family returned to Pittsburgh, where the mother 
probably died. 

♦There was a James Riddell, who married Katherine Scott, Jul}- 18, 1686; she 
died May 23. 1733. A Mrs. Mary, wife of James Riddell, son of Hugh and Mary 
Riddell, died Nov. 3, 1664. All recorded with the preceding, and without doubt of 
the same connection. 



RIDDLES OF BALLYMONY, IRELAND. 197 

John Riddell 2 (1), a son of Robert 1 (1), was born in the town of 
Ballymony, County Antrim, Ireland ; married and settled at Meath Park, 
County Londonderry, Ireland, where his eight children were born. He 
came to America between 1850 and 1855, and died at Pittsburgh, Perm., 
Aug. 25, 1854, in his sixty-fifth year. His wife predeceased him June 2, 
1842, in Ireland. He was a farmer. 

It is presumed there were other children of Robert 1 (1). 

THIRD GENERATION. 

William-Dilismore Riddell 3 (1), eldest son of Charles 2 (1), was born 
in Ballymony, Ireland, April 11, 1823 ; married Margaret, youngest daugh- 
ter of Rev. Robert Hutton, of Meadville, Penn., afterwards of the M. E. 
Church, Lebanon, Tenn., and had issue three daughters and one son. Soon 
after coming to America be engaged under Dr. J. L. Reed, then in charge 
of the Methodist Publishing-House, at Pittsburgh, Penn., and while there, 
in consequence of his letters falling into the hands of others of the same 
name, changed his surname from " Riddell " to " Riddle," and others of the 
family followed suit. In 1854, in company with the Wells brothers of 
Wellsville, Penn., he started a whip-factory at Pittsburgh, where he died 
in 1864. His family removed to Tennessee a few years after, and his wife 
died at Lebanon in 1880. 

Matilda Riddell 3 (1), eldest daughter of Charles' 2 (1), was born in 
Ballymony, Ireland, July 15, 1825; was married to James Small of Bloom- 
ington, hid., in 1852. 

Samuel Riddell 3 (1), second son of Charles 2 (1), was born in Bally- 
mony, Ireland, June 3, 1827 ; married Jennie, daughter of William Boyd,* 
a prominent merchant of Philadelphia, in the summer of 1854, and had 
issue five children, of whom hereafter. He early became a compositor on 
the Pittsburgh Daily Gazette, and rose by degrees to business manager, 
editor, and part owner of that paper. He was ten years postmaster of 
Allegheny City, having received his commission from President Lincoln. 
He was a member of the Presbyterian church, and when the war of the 
Rebellion broke out had a large class of young men in the Sabbath-school. 
When President Lincoln called for three-months' men, Mr. Riddell felt it 
his duty to respond, and immediately telegraphed to Washington to know 
if he might leave his assistant in the post-office, and go into the army, 
provided he could raise a company; the answer was, "Make ready and 
come." In less than a week he was on his way to the front, — his class 
among the first to follow him, — and went out with Knap's Battalion, 
captain of Company C. The sudden change from office duties to active 
held service brought on a disease that followed him ever after, hastening 
his death, which terminated several years of intense suffering, endured in 
the spirit of a true martyr, in 1877, in Charleston, S. C. During the 
period of his political career he was instrumental in the erection of the 
public building in Allegheny, and in the improvement of the park. Mr. 
Riddell was six feet in height, broad-shouldered, symmetrical of form ; had 
good complexion, brown hair and eyes, and full, well-dressed beard. Two 
months after the death of Mr. Riddell his widow moved to Hoddonsfield, 

* William Boyd was the youngest of a large family in Antrim, Ireland, related to 
the Riddells there. He was shipwrecked at the age of eighteen, when on his way 
to America, and washed ashore at Newfoundland. He settled in Philadelphia; 
possessed executive ability, firm religious principles, aud soon took his place among 
the successful merchants of Philadelphia. 



198 RIDDLES OF BALtYMONY, IRELAND. 

N. J., where she has built a pretty home. To her the promise, "I will 
establish the border of the widow," has beeu fully Aerified, and her chil- 
dren are ornaments in society. 

Mary Riddell 3 (1), second daughter of Charles- (1), was born Jan. 23, 

1829, and died at Pittsburgh, Penn., in June, 1872; unmarried. 

Jane Riddell 3 (1), third daughter of Charles- (1), was born Nov. 12, 

1830, and is now living in Allegheny City, Penn. 

Hugh Riddell 3 (1), third son of Charles 2 (1), was born in Ballymony, 
Ireland, May 1, 1832, and died at the age of seven, in Pennsylvania. 

Robert Riddle 3 (2), youngest son of Charles 2 (1), was born in Bally- 
mony, Ireland, Feb. 23, 1834; came to America with his parents in 1835, 
and has been twice married : first, to Hannah, daughter of Francis Mc- 
Kinley, of Bloomington, Ind. (she and three children died of consump- 
tion); secondly, Elizabeth, daughter of William K. McAlister, of Nash- 
ville, Tenn., in 1872, by whom tico children. He sold his interest in the 
firm of A. & D. H. Chambers & Co., glass manufacturers, Pittsburgh, Penn., 
in 1874, and removed to Tennessee, where, in the city of Nashville, he 
now carries on a sash, door, and blind factory. He is said to be six feet 
and two inches in height, and fine looking. 



Martha Riddell 3 (1), eldest daughter of John 2 (1), was born in Ire- 
land, Londonderry County, about 1809; was married to Hugh Cunning- 
ham, and has a son Charles, supposed to be in California. Martha and 
husband reside at Glengadd, Bendoorah, County Antrim, Ireland. 

Thomas Riddell 3 (1), eldest son of John 2 (1), was born in Ireland, 
about 1810-11, and died in New York city, in 1879. He was twice mar- 
ried, and had three children, all of whom died in infancy. His last wife 
(whose maiden-name was Sarah Boden) survives, and lives in the United 
Presbyterian Home, in New York city. 

Charles Riddell 3 (2), second son of John 2 (1), came to Philadelphia, 
and died there, aged eighteen ; was a marble-cutter. 

William-John Riddell 3 (2), third son of John 2 (1), was born at Meath 
Park, County Londonderry, Ireland; came to this country in 1848; mar- 
ried Agnes Fulton, in Allegheny City, Penn., April 2, 1850, and had seven 
children, of whom hereafter. He was employed as gardener in Pittsburgh, 
Penn., for five years, then removed to Ripley, Brown County, O., where 
he followed the same business; returned to Pittsburgh in 1806, where he 
now resides. 

Holland Riddle 3 (1), fourth son of John 2 (1), was born at Meath 
Park, Londonderry County, Ireland, Dec. 2, 1820 ; came to America in 
1848; married Nov. 11, 1850, in Lawrence ville, Allegheny County, Penn., 
Hester-Ann Reed; Rev. Nathaniel West, of the Presbyterian Church, per- 
forming the ceremony at her residence. He was first employed as clerk 
at Edward Healzelton's wholesale grocery in the "Diamond," Pittsburgh, 
Penn., where he remained one year; next, one year in the same capacity 
for Waterman & Clouse, on Liberty Street. He subsequently engaged in 
business for himself, and dealt in produce and game for five years, when 
the partnership of Riddle, Wilts & Co. was formed and continued two 
years. After the dissolution of this firm he purchased stock and buildings 
of John D. McGill & Son, and carried on the wholesale grocery and pro- 
dace business under his own name until 1871, when, having built a hand- 
some four-story stone-front on the site of the old buildings, he admitted 
his son, then a young man, who had been with him many years, under the 



RIDDLES OF BALLYMONY, IRELAND. 199 

style of H. Riddle, Son & Co. He died of consumption Oct. 20, 1872, 
leaving a widow and several children, of whom hereafter. He was for 
many years a member of the Lawrenceville Presbyterian Church of Pitts- 
burgh, Penn., and also treasurer of the society for a number of years, 
being such at the time of his decease. Place of residence was Lawrence- 
ville, on the Greensburg Pike, which is now the 15th ward, and Pennsyl- 
vania Avenue, Pittsburgh, Penn. 

Margaret-Jane Riddell 3 (1), second daughter of John 2 (1), was born 
in Ireland, and came to America when about twenty years of age. She 
was married to William Johnston, at Pittsburgh, Penn., Oct. 3, 1859, and 
has two daughters, one of whom is married. Mr. Johnston is connected 
with the O'Hara Glass Works at Pittsburgh. 

Robert Riddell 3 (3), fifth son of John- (1), was born in County Lon- 
donderry, Ireland, and came to America in company with Margaret, and 
died from the effects of injuries received by a boiler-explosion in Wal- 
lace's Marble Works, Pittsburgh, Penn., Oct. 2, 1860. He was a marble- 
worker by occupation. 

Mary-Anu Riddell 3 (2), third daughter of John 2 (1), was born in 
County Londonderry, Ireland, and came to America in company with 
Robert and Margaret. She became the wife of William J. Hammond, of 
Pittsburgh, Penn., in 1860, and has four sons. Residence, Bellevue Bor- 
ough, on the P., Ft. W. & C. Railway, where they have lived since 1870. 
Mr. Hammond is an iron-dealer at Pittsburgh. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Mary Riddle 4 (3), a daughter of William 3 (1), was born in Pennsyl- 
vania, and became the wife of Mr. Jacobs, now employed in the United 
States Patent Office. 

Maggie Riddle 4 (2), a daughter of William 3 (1), became the wife of 
Robert Chester, lawyer, of Jackson, Tenn., grandson of Col. Robert 
Chester, of Jonesboro', now of Jackson, Tenn. 

Bertie Riddle 4 (1), a daughter of William 3 (1), was born in Pennsyl- 
vania (probably at Pittsburgh), and is single. 

William Riddle 4 (3), only son of William 3 (1), born in Pennsylvania, 
now supposed to be in Tennessee ; single. 



Elizabeth-Dinsmore Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of Samuel 3 (1), 
was born at Allegheny, Penn., in February, 1857. 

Frances-Boyd Riddell 4 (1), second daughter of Samuel 3 (1), was 
born at Allegheny, Penn., in April, 1861. 

Charles Riddell 4 (3), eldest son of Samuel 3 (1), was born at Alle- 
gheny, Penn., in July, 1864. 

All£UStllS-H. Riddell 4 (1), second son of Samuel 3 (1), was born at 
Allegheny, Penn., in June, 1870. 

Samuel-H. Riddell 4 (2), youngest son of Samuel 3 (1), was born at 
Allegheny, Penn., in January, 1872, and with his brothers and sisters lives 
at Haddonsfield, N. J. 

Robert Riddle 4 (4), eldest son of Robert 3 (2), was born at Pittsburgh, 
Penn., and died young, of consumption. 

Francis Riddle 4 (1), second son of Robert 8 (2), was born at Pitts- 
burgh, Penn., and died young, of consumption. 



200 RIDDLES OF BALLYMONY, IRELAND. 



Hannah Riddle 4 (1), eldest daughter of Robert 3 (2), was born at Pitts- 
burgh, Penn., and died young, of consumption. 

William-King Riddle 4 (4), a son of Robert 8 (2) and his second wife, 
is now living at Nashville, Tenn. 

Elizabeth Riddle 4 (2), youngest daughter of Robert 3 (2), is now liv- 
ing at Nashville, Tenn. 

Mary -Jane Riddle 4 (4), eldest daughter of William 3 (2), was born at 
Pittsburgh, Penn., Nov. 25, 1852; single. 

Thomas-Holland Riddle 4 (2), eldest son of William 3 (2), was born 
at Pittsburgh, Penn., March 2, 1855; now employed in the iron-yard of 
W. J. Hammond, Esq. ; single. 

William-Lewis Riddle 4 (5), second son of William 3 (2), was born at 
Ripley, O., July 29, 1860 ; engraver on glass. 

Samuel Riddle 4 (3), third son of William 3 (2), was born at Ripley, 
O., Sept. 8, 1862. 

Charles Riddle 4 (4), fourth son of William 3 (2), was born at Ripley, 
O., Sept. 25, 1865; clerk A. V. R. R. freight-office, Pittsburgh, Penn. 

Lilly-May Riddle 4 (1), eldest daughter of William 3 (2), was born at 
Pittsburgh, "Penn., Dec. 6, 1867. 

Blanche Riddle 4 (1), second daughter of William 3 (2), was born at 
Pittsburgh, Penn., Oct. 4, 1870. 

Charles-Easton Riddle 4 (5), eldest son of Holland 3 (1), was born at 
Pittsburgh, Penn., Jan. 25, 1852; was in business with his father until the 
time of his death in 1872, and appointed administrator of the estate after 
his decease. He and his mother carried on the same business under same 
firm-name until 1875, when it was closed up; since that time has been 
clerk in various firms in one branch or other of iron-manufacturing busi- 
ness, being at present bookkeeper for the Iron City Tool Works (limited) ; 
unmarried. 

Lilly-May Riddle 4 (2), eldest daughter of Holland 3 (1), was born at 
Pittsburgh, Penn., May 2, 1855, and died of scarlet fever, May 28, 1864. 

William-Lewis Riddle 4 (6), second son of Holland 3 (1), was born at 
Pittsburgh, Penn., Oct. 4, 1857 ; died Feb. 22, 1858. 

Bertha Riddle 4 (2), second daughter of Holland 3 (1), was born at 
Pittsburgh, Penn., July 8, 1859; was married Sept. 3, 1877, to Lloyd G. 
Brown, of Cincinnati, O., now a physician practising in Huntington, W. 
Va. One child. 

Samuel Riddle 4 (4), third son of Holland 3 (1), was born at Pitts- 
burgh, Penn., March 20, 1862; died June 24, 1862. 

Holland-Reed Riddle 4 (2), fourth son of Holland 3 (1), was bom at 
Pittsburgh, Penn., Nov. 23, 1863 ; removed to Kansas and engaged in 
farming for his grandmother (on his mother's side) in September, 1880. 
Address, Paola, Miami County, Kan. 

Edgar- Adams Riddle 4 (1), fifth son of Holland 3 (1), was born at 
Pittsburgh, Penn., March 25, 1867 ; went West with his brother Holland, 
but returned to Pittsburgh the following year, and engaged at Union 
Iron Mills. Has since visited the West, but now (1884) in his native city. 

Dinsmore-Lea Riddle 4 (1), youngest son of Holland 3 (1), was born 
at Pittsburgh, Penn., Jan. 21, 1871, and died April 6, 1872. 



BID DELLS OF GLANISH, IB ELAND. 201 



RIDDELLS OF GLANISH, IRELAND. 

[American Branch]. 

Andrew Riddell 1 (1), descended from Scottish ancestors (parents' 
names not known), early settled in Ulster, in the north of Ireland, mar- 
ried in the County of Monaghan,* and reared a numerous family, several 
of whom came to the United States and Canada. He and his ancestors 
spelled their names Riddell. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

John Riddle 2 (1), a son of Andrew 1 (1), was horn in the County of 
Monaghan, town of Glanish, Ireland ; married Susan Henderson, daugh- 
ter of John Henderson, who was a titled land-owner in Ireland, of Scot- 
tish descent, and came to the United States in 1816, with several of his 
children, of whom there were thirteen. He died in Philadelphia, Penn., 
in 1827; his widow died in Allegheny City, in 1844. 

Hugh Riddle 2 (1), a son of Andrew 1 (1), was born in the town of 
Glanish, County of Monaghan, Ireland, and came to Canada, British 
North America, where it is presumed he lived and died. No particulars. 

Joseph Riddle 2 (1), a son of Andrew 1 (1), was born in the township 
of Glanish, County Monaghan, Ireland, and came to Canada, British 
North America, where he is supposed to have reared a family and died. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

William Riddle 3 (1), eldest son of John- (1), was born in Glanish, 
County Monaghan, Ireland ; came to the United States with his father's 
family in 1816, and died at Pittsburgh, Penn., unmarried, when young. 

James Riddle 3 (1), second son of John 2 (1), was born in the town of 
Glanish, County Monaghan, Ireland ; came to the United States with 
his parents in 1816, and died unmarried, when quite old. 

Andrew Riddle 3 (2), third son of John 2 (1), was born in Glanish, 
County Monaghan, Ireland; came to America with his parents in 1816, 
and was killed in the war of 1812, in the service of the United States. 

Elizabeth Riddle 3 (1), eldest daughter of John' 2 (1), was born in 
Glanish, County Monaghan, Ireland ; came to the United States with her 
parents, and died when a child. 

Ann Riddle 3 (1), second daughter of John 2 (1), was born in Glanish, 
County Monaghan, Ireland ; died in infancy. 

Maxwell Riddle 3 (1), fourth son of John 2 (1), was born in Glanish, 
County Monaghan, Ireland ; married to Ann Nesbit, daughter of George 
and Isabella Nesbit, of Scotch descent, of Sligo, Ireland, and by her had 
issue six children. He married secondly, to Jane Riddle (I think she was 
his cousin"), by whom he had issue t /bw children. He came to the United 
States in 1831, and settled near Byesville, Guernsey County, O., where he 
died Jan. 11, 1869 ;• his widow Nov. 20, 1873. 

* This branch of the Kiddell family is descended from Scottish, ancestors who 
received a grant of four townlands, named Cornasoo, Glanish, Annamacneal, and 
Mullacrank, County Monaghan, under Cromwell, and are all connected with other 
families named in this book that were from Monaghan. But few kept a register, 
and the degree of relationships is not made out ; possibly some venerable member 
may, from reading this book, replace the missing link in the family chain. This 
branch spell the surname Biddell in Ireland. Some have changed to Biddle in the 
United States. 



202 BIDDELLS OF GLANISH, IRELAND. 

Elizabeth Riddle 3 (2), third daughter of John 2 (1), was born in 
Glanish, County Monaghan, Ireland ; was married to James Gordon, of 
Philadelphia, and died of old age, at Pittsburgh, Penn., in July, 1873. 

Isaac Riddle 3 (1), fifth son of John- (1), was born in the town of 
Glanish (or Glenish), County Monaghan, Ireland, and died in- Pittsburgh, 
Penn., a young man. 

John Riddle 3 (2), sixth son of John- (1), was born in Glanish, County 
Monaghan, Ireland, and settled in Pittsburgh, Penn., where he married 
Margaret Bell. He had issue two children, of whom hereafter ; deceased. 

Mary Riddle 3 (1), fourth daughter of John' 2 (1), was born in Glanish, 
County Monaghan, Ireland; came to America with her parents in 1816, 
and was married to Henry Warner, of Pittsburgh, Penn.; died in 1876. 

Hugh Kiddle 3 (2), seventh son of John 2 (1), was born in Glanish, 
County Monaghan, Ireland ; came to America in 1816, and for a few years 
lived with his parents in New York city ; subsequently lived in Philadel- 
phia till his father's death in 1827, when he went with his mother and the 
other children to Pittsburgh ; there he married, Oct. 10, 1833, Miss Eliza 
Thomburgh, of Clinton, Penn., by whom he had six children, of whom 
hereafter. He died in 1863 ; his widow died in 1873. 

Allll Riddle 3 (2), fifth daughter of John 2 (1), was born in Glanish, 
County Monaghan, Ireland ; died in infancy. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 



James Riddle 4 (2), eldest son of Maxwell 3 (1), was born in County 
Monaghan, Ireland, and died there in infancy. 

John Riddle 4 (3), second son of Maxwell 3 (1), was born in County 
Monaghan, Ireland, and died at the age of 11 years, in Allegheny County, 
Penn. 

Hugh Riddle 4 (3), third son of Maxwell 3 (1), was born in County 
Monaghan, Ireland ; came to America in 1832, and died in Allegheny 
County, Penn. 

Isabella Riddle 4 (1), eldest daughter of Maxwell 3 (1), was born in 
County Monaghan, Ireland ; came to the United States with her father 
in 1832 ; was married to Hugh Riddle, son of Robert and Jane Riddle, 
and grandson of Hugh Riddle, who lived in Ireland, or Scotland. (See 
" Riddells of Robinson Run.") Mrs. Riddle is the oldest member of the 
family now living; she resides at Remington, Allegheny County, Penn., 
and has one daughter, of whom hereafter. Mrs. Riddle has provided much 
valuable information for this book. 

Susan Riddle 4 (1), second daughter of Maxwell 3 (1), was born in 
County Monaghan, Ireland ; came to the United States with her father 

in 1832; was married to Maxwell, and is now with her sister, Isabella, 

before mentioned. 

George-N. Riddle 4 (1), fourth son of Maxwell 8 (1), was born in County 
Monaghan, Ireland, in 1828 ; came to the United States in 1832; removed 
from Allegheny County, Penn., to Guernsey County, O., in 1855, and 
was married to Rachel Wilson, of said County, in 1857. He has had is- 
sue ten children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddle resides on a farm at 
Ryesville, O. 

John Riddle 4 (4), fifth son of Maxwell 3 (1), was born in Allegheny 
County, Penn., and died young. 

Maxwell Riddle 4 (2), sixth son of Maxwell 8 (1), was born in Alle- 
gheny County, Penn., and died in youth. 



BIDDELLS OF GLANISH, IBELAND. 203 

Sarah Riddle 4 (1), third daughter of Maxwell 3 (1), was born in Alle- 
gheny County, Penn.; was married to Martin Hickle, of Dyson, Point 
Pleasant, O., and died Aug.'ft, 1878, leaving children. 

Anne Riddle 4 (1), fourth daughter of Maxwell 3 (1), was born in Alle- 
gheny County, Penn. ; was married to John Bradshaw, of County Mon- 
aghan, Ireland, and has issue. 



Susan Riddle 4 (2). \ D h f j h 8 (g) 
Jane Riddle 4 (1). ) 5 v 



Mary-Allll Riddle 4 (2), eldest daughter of Hugh 3 (2), was born in 
Allegheny, Penn., Aug. 1, 1834 ; was married to Charles Merts, of Alle- 
gheny, Oct. 1, 1855, and is now (1879) living at Ravenna, O. ; she has issue. 

John-Henderson Riddle 4 (5), eldest son of Hugh 3 (2), was born in 
Allegheny, Penn., Aug. 29, 1836; married March 26, 1862, to Nancy Mat- 
tingly, and resides in Ravenna, O. ; he has issue five children, of whom 
hereafter ; his wife was from Covington, Ky. 

Henry-Warner Riddle 4 (1), second son of Hugh 8 (2), was born in 
Allegheny, Penn., Feb. 8, 1838 ; married Jan. 22, 1866, to Emily H. Rob- 
inson, of Ravenna, O., and is engaged extensively in manufacturing fine 
carriages of every description, at Ravenna, O. He has three children, of 
whom hereafter. 

Susanna Riddle 4 (1), second daughter of Hugh 3 (2), was born in Al- 
legheny, Penn., Sept. 25, 1841 ; was married Dec. 17, 1863, to Ewal Pit- 
man, and lives at Ravenna, O. She has issue. 

Janies-Thornbnrg Riddle 4 (3), third son of Hugh 3 (2), was born in 
Allegheny, Penn., March 14, 1843 ; married Nov. 24," 1864, to Emily Wel- 
ton, and resides at Ravenna, O. He has three children, of whom here- 
after. 

Thomas-J. Riddle 4 (1), fourth son of Hugh 3 (2), was born in Alle- 
gheny, Penn., June 5, 1845 ; married Nov. 29, 1877, to Helen Gowey, of 
Ravenna, O. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

Snsan-N. Riddle 5 (3), eldest daughter of George 4 (1), was born in 
Guernsey County, O., March 22, 1859; died Aug. 13, 1859. 

Thonias-A. Riddle 5 (2), twin son of George 4 (1), was born in Guern- 
sey County, O., July 27, 1860; died Oct. 4, 1860. 

Maxwell-A. Riddle 5 (3), twin to Thomas 5 (2), was born in Guernsey 
County, O., July 27, 1860; is living at home. 

Henry-H. Riddle 5 (2), third son of George 4 (1), was born in Guern- 
sey County, O., Sept. 7, 1861; died Sept. 30, 1861. 

LillCOln-0. Riddle 5 (1), fourth son of George 4 (1), was born in Guern- 
sey County, O., Oct. 18, 1862, and lives at home. 

George Riddle 5 (2), fifth son of George 4 (1), was born in Guernsey 
County, O., Aug. 21, 1864; died Sept. 6, 1864. 

Rachel Riddle 5 (1), second daughter of George 4 (1), was born in 
Guernsey County, O., Aug. 21, 1864; died Sept. 6, 1864. ' 

Ellsworth Riddle 5 (1), sixth son of George 4 (1), was born in Guern- 
sey County, O., Oct. 21, 1865 ; lives at home. 

Elizabeth-J. Riddle 5 (1), third daughter of George 4 (1), was born in 
Guernsey County, O., Nov. 10, 1866 ; lives at home. 

Tracy-C. Riddle 5 (1), youngest child of George 4 (1), was born in 
Guernsey County, O., April 12, 1868; died Oct. 13, 1878. 



204 RIDDELLS OF CORNASOO, IRELAND. 

Charles-R. Riddle 5 (1), eldest son of John 4 (5), was born in Coving- 
ton, Ivy., Nov. 18, 1864. 

Lida-B. Riddle 5 (1), eldest daughter of 'John 4 (5), was born in Cov- 
ington, Ky., June 22, 1868. 

Etta-J. Riddle 5 (1), second daughter of John 4 (5), was born in Cov- 
ington, Ky., Sept. 26, 1870. 

Mary-E. Riddle 5 (3), third daughter of John 4 (5), was born in Coving- 
ton, Ky., Nov. 21, 1872. 

Lizzie Riddle 5 (1), fourth daughter of John 4 (5), was born in Coving- 
ton, Ky., April 23, 1874. 



Bessie-Eleanor Riddle 5 (1), eldest daughter of Henry 4 (1), was born 
in Ravenna, O., April 3, 1867. 

Maxwell-Freeman Riddle 5 (4), eldest son of Henry 4 (1), was born 
in Ravenna, O., Nov. 8, 1870. 

Amy-Howard Riddle 5 (1), second daughter of Henry 4 (1), was born 
in Ravenna, O., Dec. 12, 1875. 



Mary-Thornbnrg Riddle 5 (4), eldest daughter of James 4 (3), was 
born in Ravenna, O., March 8, 1868; died in infancy. 

Charles-Welton Riddle 5 (2), eldest son of James 4 (3), was born in 
Ravenna, O., July 26, 1871. 

Harry-H. Riddle 5 (1), second son of James 4 (3), was born in Raven- 
na, O., Feb. 8, 1874. 



RIDDELLS OF CORNASOO, IRELAND. 

[Pennsylvania Branch.] 

John Riddell 1 (1), descended from Scottish ancestors who settled in 
Ireland under Cromwell, resided at Cornasoo, or Mullacrank, County Mon- 
aghan, Ireland; was land-owner ; had several sons and daughters; wife's 
name unknown. He was closely related to Andrew, whose name stands 
at the head of the preceding pedigree, but in what degree is not known. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Hugh Riddell" (1), son of John 1 (1), was born in Glanish, County 
Monaghan, Ireland; married to Jane C. Rodgers, and had issue six or 
seven children, of whom hereafter. 

Andrew Riddell' 2 (1), a son of John 1 (1), was born in Glanish, Coun- 
ty Monaghan, Ireland, and had issue several children, of whom hereafter ;* 
he lived in Glanish. 

Robert Riddell 2 (1), a son of John 1 (1), was born in Glanish, County 
Monaghan, Ireland, and had issue two sons, and perhaps daughters, of 
whom hereafter; he lived at Glanish. 

* Andrew Riddell, uncle of Rev. John Riddell, d. d.. of Robinson's Run, Penn., 
had a daughter who became the wife of a Mr. Bridge, whose daughter was married 
to John Riddell, of Annamacneal. 



RIDDELLS OF CORNASOO, IRELAND. 205 



THIRD GENERATION. 

Robert Riddell 8 (2), a son of Hugh- (1), was born in Glanish, County 
Monaghan, Ireland ; married Miss Jane Graham ; emigrated to the United 
States, and settled in Allegheny County, Penn. ; had issue nine children, 
of whom hereafter. He and his wife died in the family of his son Hugh, 
whose wife was Isabella Riddle ; see preceding pedigree. 

Rev. John Riddell 3 (2), d. d., a son of Hugh- (1), was born in Cor- 
nasoo, County Monaghan, Ireland, in the year 1758 ; married for his first 
wife Miss Margaret Arnold, a native of Ireland, by whom he had issue 
five children. His first wife died about eleven years after their arrival in 
the United States. His second wife was a Mrs. Gabby, originally a Miss 
Mitchell, of Washington County, Penn., by whom he had issue five chil- 
dren, of whom (with the first family) hereafter. It is not certainly known 
in what year Mr. Riddell commenced his college-course; his diploma, 
however, shows that he graduated at the University of Glasgow, on the 
10th of April, 1782; and from a comparison of dates it would seem that 
as soon as he had finished his college-course he commenced and prosecu- 
ted to a successful issue the study of theology. This he did under the 
supervision and instruction of the celebrated John Brown, of Hadding- 
ton. He was licensed to preach on the 14th of June, 1788 ; and on the 
18th of November of the same year he was installed pastor of the con- 
gregation in Donaghloney, County Down. In this connection he re- 
mained till the spring of 1794', when he demitted his charge and came to 
the United States. In August of the same year he was installed at Rob- 
inson's Run, as pastor of the united congregations of Robinson's Run 
and Union, in the vicinity of Pittsburgh, Penn. As these congregations 
rapidly increased under his ministry, he was, in a few years, released from 
the charge at Union and settled, agreeably to his own preference, and to 
the entire satisfaction of the people, for the whole of his time at Robin- 
son's Run. The whole period of his ministry in this congregation was 
thirty-five years. His ministerial career extended through a period 
of forty-one years. When he came to the United States he connected 
himself with the Associate Reformed Church. He was a close student, 
and prepared for the pulpit with great care ; he was an excellent pastor 
and instructive teacher. That he was not and is not more extensively 
known to the Christian world may be owing to the fact that none of the 
productions of his pen were ever published. The last public business to 
which he attended was the performance of the marriage ceremony. He 
died Sept. 4, 1829, in the seventy-second year of his age. His remains 
on the day after his decease were followed to the grave by a very large 
number of people, many of whom felt that they had sustained a loss that 
could not easily be made up, and amongst whom the general impression 
was, that a star of no mean lustre had disappeared from the firmament of 
the moral and ecclesiastical world. 

Dr. Riddell was a man of medium size ; his visage was rather long and 
sharp ; his eyes were dark and piercing ; his lips thin and slightly com- 
pressed. He became naturalized soon after coming to the United States, 
and ever after manifested a sober but steady interest in the welfare of his 
adopted country. 

Thomas Riddell 3 (1), youngest son of Hugh' 2 (1), was born in Glan- 
ish, County Monaghan, Ireland ; married Sloan, and settled on land 

in Mullacrank, Ballabay, which came to him through the Rodgers family, 



206 BIDDELLS OF COBNASOO, IRELAND. 

of whom his mother was a member. He had five daughters and four sons, 
of whom hereafter. 

Sarah Riddell 3 (1), a daughter of Hugh- (1), was born in Monaghan, 
Ireland, and was married to Joseph Donaldson. 

Jaiie Riddell 3 (1), a daughter of Hugh- (1), was born in Monaghan, 
Ireland, and was married to Joseph Donaldson (?). 

Eliza Riddell 3 (1), a daughter of Hugh' 2 (1), was born in Monaghan, 
Ireland, and was married to a Mr. Armstrong. 



Joseph Riddell 3 (1), a son of Andrew- (1), was born in Monaghan, 
Ireland ; no other information. 

Margaret Riddell 3 (1), a daughter of Andrew- (1), was born in Mon- 
aghan, Ireland : was married to William Gipson. 

Sarah Riddell 3 (2), a daughter of Andrew- (1), was born in Mona- 
ghan, Ireland, and was married to a Mr. Craigh. 



James Riddell 3 (1), a son of Robert- (1), was born in the County 
Monaghan, Ireland, and died in America, issueless. 

Dr. John Riddell 3 (3), a son of Robert- (1), was born in the County 
Monaghan, Ireland, and died in America, issueless. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Hugh Riddell 4 (2), eldest son of Robert 3 (2), was born in the County 
Monaghan ; emigrated to the United States with his father's family ; mar- 
ried Isabella Riddell (or Riddle), daughter of Maxwell Riddle (see " Rid- 
dells of Glanish, Ireland"), and had issue, of whom hereafter. He resided 
in the town of Remington, Allegheny County, Penn., and cared for his 
parents in old age ; farmer. 

Margaret Riddell 4 (2), eldest daughter of Robert 3 (2), was born (pre- 
sumably) in County Monaghan, Ireland, and died in Pennsylvania. 

Sarah Riddell 4 (3), second daughter of Robert 3 (2), was born in Ire- 
land (?); came to Pennsylvania with her parents in 1831 ; was married to 
John Logan, and died at Greencastle, la., leaving issue there. 

Jane Riddle 4 (2), third daughter of Robert 3 (2), born in the County 
Monaghan, Ireland, was married to Maxwell Riddle, of Byesville, O., and 
had issue; died Nov. 30, 1873; see "Riddells of Glanish, Ireland." 

Esther Riddle 4 (1), fifth daughter of Robert 3 (2). 

Eliza Riddle 4 (1), sixth daughter of Robert 3 (2), was married to Wil- 
liam McClelland, and died in Allegheny County, Penn. 

Rachel Riddle 4 (1), seventh daughter of Robert 3 (2). 

John Riddle 4 (4), a son of Robert 3 (2). 

Robert Riddle 4 (3), a son of Robert 8 (2). 



Hugh Riddell 4 (3), eldest son of Rev. John 8 (2), was born in Pitts- 
burgh, or Robinson's Run, Allegheny County, Penn. 

John Riddell 4 (5), a son of Rev. John 3 (2), was born in Washington 
or Allegheny County, Penn., about the year 1797 ; was educated at Jef- 
ferson College ; studied law with Mr. Foster, of Greenburg, Westmore- 
land County, Penn., and was admitted to the bar. He married, about 

* The ancestors of this family are said to have come to Ireland with Cromwell, 
and received grants of four townlaixK namely, Cornasoo, Glanish, Annamacneal, 
and Mullacrank. One was William. All were farmers and linen manufacturers. 



BIDDELLS OF COBNASOO, IBELAND. 207 

1826, Miss Elizabeth Speer, second daughter of Rev. William Speer, d. d.; 
settled at Meadville, Penn., but removed about 1828 to Erie in the same 
State. He was a successful and distinguished lawyer ; was in the State 
Legislature ; noted for eloquence and power as an advocate ; espoused ar- 
dently the anti-masonic side in the bitter controversies of the period from 
1830 to 1836; died of pulmonary disease, in Canonsburg, Washington 
County, Penn., July 4, 1837, having had issue four sons and one daughter, 
born between 1829 and 1836, of whom hereafter. 

Nancy Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of Rev. John 3 (2). 

Jane Riddell 4 (3), second daughter of Rev. John 3 (2), was born in 
Allegheny County, Penn.; was married to Sturgeon, and has issue. 

Margaret-Ann Riddell 4 (3), third daughter of Rev. John 3 (2), was 
born in Pennsylvania; was married to John M. Allen, in 1837 ; had issue, 
and died Feb. "28, 1856. 

Dr. George Riddell 4 (1), third son of Rev. John 3 (2), was born in 
Pennsylvania; married, and has a family of children;* is now a prac- 
tising physician at Indianapolis, Ind.; considered a skilful practitioner, 
and has a large patronage. 

Robert Riddell 4 (4), fourth son of Rev. John 3 (2), was born in Penn- 
sylvania, and is now living at Knoxville, Jefferson County, O. ; he does 
not reply to my letters of inquiry. 

Joseph Riddell 4 (2), fifth son of Rev. John 3 (2), was born in Penn- 
sylvania; no other information. 

Eliza Riddell 4 (2), fourth daughter of Rev. John 3 (2), was born in 
Pennsylvania; no record of marriage. 

Mary Riddell 4 (1), fifth daughter of Rev. John 3 (2), was born in Penn- 
sylvania, and was married to Berry ; resides in Steuben ville, O. 

James Riddell 4 (1), a son of Thomas 3 (1), was born in Glanish, County 

Monaghan, Ireland ; married Riddell, a daughter of John, and has 

seven children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddell lives on a large farm in 
the township of Mullacrank, called a "freehold," which has come down 
from his remote ancestors. 

William Riddell 4 (1), a son of Thomas 3 (1), was born in the County 
Monaghan, and is now in Victoria, Australia. 

Riddell 4 (0), eldest daughter of Thomas 3 (1), was born in County 

Monaghan, Ireland ; married to P. H. McPherson, and now resides in 
Mendota, 111. 

Elizabeth Riddell 4 (1), second daughter of Thomas 3 (1), was born in 
County Monaghan, Ireland ; was married to a Mr. Killgour, and is now 
living in wealth at Greymouth, New Zealand, Australia. 

Mary- Ami Riddell 4 (2), third daughter of Thomas 3 (1), was born in 

County Monaghan, Ireland ; married Wooland, and is now living at 

Gipsland, Victoria, Australia. 

Jane Riddell 4 (4), fourth daughter of Thomas 3 (1), born in County 
Monaghan, Ireland, was married to a Mr. White, and is now in Australia. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

Anilie-Nesbit Riddell 5 (1), only daughter of Hugh 4 (2) and his wife, 

* Dr. J. C. Riddell, a son of Dr. Geo. W. Riddell, of Indianapolis, Ind., and 
grandson of Rev. John Riddell, d. d., formerly of Robinson's Run, Penn., has an 
" Opium Curative Institute " at Kansas City, Mo. I cannot prevail upon this fam- 
ily to provide their history or record. 



208 1UDDELLS OF ANXAMACXEAL, IRELAKD. 

Isabella, who was a daughter of Maxwell Riddle, is a school-teacher, and 
lives with her parents at Allegheny County, Penn. ; she was born June 
26, 1854. " 

Jollll-W. RiddelP (6), eldest son of John 4 (5), was born at Erie, Penn., 
about 1829. He took a partial course at Jefferson College, Penn. ; was ap- 
pointed midshipman in the U. S. navy, about 1847, and served several years, 
when he resigned. Studied law at Pittsburgh, Penn., with H. S. Magran, 
Esq., and was there admitted to the bar, about 1854. Was several years 
Assistant District Attorney of Allegheny County, Penn. Resided several 
years in Pittsburgh, but a few years ago, 1878, went to Gilroy, Cal., where, 
having retired from the practice of his profession, he now (1884) resides. 
Wife's name not known ; has one daughter. 

Speer Riddell 5 (1), second son of John 4 (5), was born at Erie, Penn., 
about 1830; received partial classical education at private academies ; was 
a bank-clerk with General Larimer (?), of Pittsburgh, Penn., from 1848 to 
1853 ; in the latter year he moved to California, and has been bank-teller 
in San Francisco more than twenty-five years ; has recently resigned his 
position, and is now the president of the San Bernardino Borax Mining- 
Company. Has never married. Lives in San Francisco. 

James Riddell 5 (2), third son of John 4 (5), was born at Erie, Penn., 
and is a druggist by profession, well acquainted with his business ; he was 
at one time member of the large drug-importing firm of Crane & Brig- 
ham, of San Francisco. He is a man of energetic character and popular 
traits. Has retired in competent circumstances, and is living in the coun- 
try near Gilroy, Cal., which State has been his place of residence since 
1857 ; unmarried. 

DeWitt-C. RiddelP (1), fourth son of John 4 (5), removed at an early 
age from Erie, Penn., and resided for a few years with the family of his 
uncle, Rev. O. A. Patterson, in New Lisbon, O. ; afterwards removed to 
Pittsburgh, Penn., and entered the service of Alexander James, tea-mer- 
chant. In 1855, he went to California, and has been in the employ of 
banking and express companies till 1881, when he engaged in fruit-culture 
near Gilroy, on a beautiful farm he has named " Glen-Riddell," for a fam- 
ily seat in Scotland; see "Riddells of Glen-Riddell," in this book. Mr. 
Riddell has a taste for farm life and sports of the field ; enjoys camping- 
out and hunting adventures, and has roamed over mountain and plain. 
He spent many years in the mining regions of California and Nevada, 
when connected with Wells & Fargo's Express Company. Is married, 
and has two children, of whom hereafter. 

Harriet-E. RiddelP (1), only daughter of John 4 (5), was born in 
Erie, Penn. ; was married to Col. Samuel C. Magill, formerly of Clinton, 
la., but now of Fargo, Dak., and has Jive living children, of whom two 
are married. 



RIDDELLS OF ANNAMACNEAL, IRELAND. 

Gordon Riddell 1 (1), descended from Scottish ancestors, said to have 
settled in Ireland under Cromwell, lived and died in the parish of Tully- 
corbit, County of Monaghan ; he had issue. 



BID DELLS OF ANNAMACNEAL, IRELAND. 209 

Hugh Riddell 1 (1), brother of the preceding, lived in one of the town- 
ships granted his ancestors in County Monaghan ; married and had issue. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

John Riddell 2 (1), a son of Gordon 1 (1), was born in County Mona- 
ghan, township of Annamacneal ; married and had issue. 

John Riddell" (2), a son of Hugh 1 (1), was born in County Mona- 
ghan, Ireland; married Elizabeth Bridge, a wealthy farmer's daughter, 
and had issue three sons and eight daughters, of whom hereafter; Mr. 
Riddell was a farmer. 

Hugh Riddell' 2 (2), a son of Hugh 1 (1), died unmarried. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Hugh Riddell 3 (3), a son of John' 2 (1), resides on a part of one of 
four townships granted his ancestors, called Annamacneal in the parish 
of Tullycorbit, County Monaghan, — the place where he was born, — con- 
sisting of about ten acres freeland. 



Robert Riddell 3 (1), grandson of Gordon 1 (1), resides at Annamac- 
neal, Ballybay, County Monaghan, Ireland, on twelve acres of freeland. 

Gordon Riddell 3 (2), grandson of Gordon 1 (1), resides on a freeland 
at Ballybay* that came to him from his remote ancestors, consisting of 
twelve acres ; I do not know the name of the father. 

Rev. Hugh Riddell 3 (4), son of John 2 (2) and his wife, Elizabeth 
Bridge, was born in County Monaghan, Ireland, and is now a Presbyte- 
rian minister in Glasgow, Scotland. 

William Riddell 3 (1), a son of John- (2), is now living in County 
Fermanaugh, Ireland; farmer ; has a family. 

John Riddell 3 (3), a son of John- (2), was born in County Monaghan, 
and came to Canada when a lad. He married for his first wife, Matilda 
Dane (or Done), who died June 8, 1879, — "an amiable Christian woman." 
He married secondly, Ellen B. Tate, of English extraction ; she was born 
at Brewster, Mass., Jan. 20, 1848. Mr. Riddell moved to Michigan about 
1868, and settled on a large farm at Georgetown, Ottawa County, where 
he now lives and has "all that heart can wish." He has issue two 
children, of whom hereafter. 

Mary-Ann Riddell 3 (1), a daughter of John- (2) ; dead. 

Jane Riddell 3 (1), a daughter of John- (2) ; dead. 

Margaret Riddell 3 (1), a daughter of John 2 (2), was married to 

MacKelvie, and lives at Ballybay, County Monaghan, Ireland. 

Eliza Riddell 3 (1), a daughter of John 2 (2) ; deceased. 

Esther Riddell 3 (1), a daughter of John 2 (2), is living, 1883. 

Sarah Riddell 3 (1), a daughter of John 2 (2) ; deceased. 

Matilda Riddell 3 (1), a daughter of John 2 (2) ; deceased. 

Lettie Riddell 3 (1), a daughter of John 2 (2), living in 1883. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

William Riddell 4 (2), son of John 3 (3) by first wife. 
Freddie-T. Riddell 4 (1), son of John 3 (3) by second wife. 

* Archibald Riddell lives in Glanish, Dunraymond ; George Riddell in Creeragh, 
Ballybay ; and Gordon Riddell in Edenatirkin, Ballybay, — all in County Monaghan, 
— and are supposed to be connected with the families before mentioned. All occupy 
land, and are probably small farmers. 

14 



210 RIDDLES OF YOBK COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA. 



RIDDLES OF YORK COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA. 

[Donegal Branch.] 

John Riddell 1 (1), a resident of Donegal County, in the province of 
Ulster, Ireland, was descended from one of several brothers who were in 
the array of William III, and who, for their services, were rewarded with 
confiscated lands in Ulster. These ancestors were Presbyterians from 
Scotland. (See "Riddells of Ray, Ireland.") 

SECOND GENERATION. 

James Riddle" (1), a son of John 1 (1), supposed to have been born in 
Ireland; married in the year 16 — , to Janette, daughter of Tristram Jones, 
of Donegal County, Ireland, and had issue six children, of whom here- 
after. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Mary Riddle 3 (1), a daughter of James- (1), was born in Donegal, 
Ireland; was married to Walter McFarland, and had issue six children, 
four sons and two daughters. 

John Riddle 3 (2), eldest son of James' 2 (1), was born in the County 
Donegal, Ireland ; married Sarah Ewing, and died without issue. 

Tristram-Jones Riddle 3 (1), second son of James- (1), was born in 
Donegal, Ireland, and died unmarried. 

Catherine Riddle'' (1), second daughter of James 2 (1), was born in 
Donegal, Ireland ; was married to William Young, and had issue eight 
children, five sons and three daughters. 

James Riddle 3 (2), third son of James' 2 (1), w r as born in Donegal, 
Ireland; emigrated to America, and settled in York County, Penn., as a 
farmer. His wife's name has not reached me; they had issue nine chil- 
dren, of whom hereafter. There may have been daughters. 

Jane Riddle 3 (1), third daughter of James' 2 (1), was born in Donegal, 
Ireland ; was married and had issue seven children, five sons and two 
daughters. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

John Riddle 4 (3), eldest son of James 3 (2), was bom in York County, 
Penn. (probably), Jan. 24, 1752; married April 16, 1778, to Ann McKee 
(aged 18 years), and by her had issue several children, of whom hereafter. 
He was a nail-manufacturer in early life, working on the old hand-ma- 
chines at Hagerstown, Md.; afterwards principal of an academy at 
Chambersburgl), and then at Pittsburgh, Penn., where he died in 1818. 
Mr. Riddle seems to have been a prominent man in his day, and filled 
many positions of trust, one being that of magistrate. He was lame 
from white swelling, and on that account received a better education than 
it was usual for farmers' sons to have in those days. He had a commis- 
sion from Governor Mifflin, dated 16th of February, 1792, appointing 
him notary public for Franklin County, Penn. ; also a commission dated 
July 5, 1792, from the same governor, appointing him Justice of the 
Peace for the said County. 

Robert Riddle 4 (1), second son of James 8 (2), was born June 14, 1753; 
probably died young and unmarried, as no other mention is found con- 
cerning him. 

Judge James Riddle 4 (3), third son of James 8 (2), was born in Adams 
County, Penn., Jan. 20, 1755; married Elizabeth, daughter of Robert and 



RIDDLES OP YORK COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA. 211 

Agnes McPherson, of Gettysburgh, and had issue seven children, of whom 
hereafter. He graduated with great distinction at Princeton College, and 
subsequently read law at York. He was for many years tutor of lan- 
guages in Princeton College; was admitted to the Chambersburgh bar in 
1784. His legal abilities were very respectable, though he was not con- 
sidered a great lawyer; he was well read in science, literature, and laws; 
was a good advocate, and very influential with the jury. He was ap- 
pointed president judge in 1794, by Governor Mifflin, and continued in 
this position till 1804, when he resigned in consequence of the strong 
partisan feeling existing against him, — he being a great Federalist, — 
and returned to the practice of law. He was again successful and amassed 
a large fortune, which was impaired by payments of endorsements made 
for his friends. He was a soldier of the Revolution. Judge Riddle mar- 
ried for a second wife, Arianna, daughter of Dr. Stewart, of Blagdens- 
burgh, and by her had/?ue children. He was a gentleman of great dignity 
and suavity of manners ; a fine specimen of old-school politeness. He 
died in the year 1837. 

David Riddle 4 (1), fourth son of James 3 (2), was born March 29, 1757, 
probably in York County, Penn. ; married Sarah McCune (she was prob- 
ably of Harrisburg, Penn.), and settled as farmer in Amberson's valley, 
in eastern Pennsylvania, and died at Harrisburg. His brother George 
lived with him. Their old farm is now owned by Jacob B. Stewart. 

William Riddle 4 (1), fifth son of James 3 (2), was born Aug. 20, 1759 ; 
married Susanna Nounce, of English parentage, and settled in Martins- 
burgh, Va. He was a teacher and elder of the Presbyterian Church, 
" with as warm and true a Scotch-Irish heart, creed, and preferences as 
any in his day" ; these words were spoken by his son, the Rev. David H. 
Riddle, d. d., in an historical address. He died about the year 1812, 
having had issue eleven children, ten sons and one daughter, of whom 
hereafter. 

Joseph Riddle 4 (1), sixth son of James 3 (2), was born in York Coun- 
ty, Penn., April 5, 1763 ; married Sarah-Morrow Kearsley, second daugh- 
ter of John and Nancy Kearsley, of Shepherdstown, Va., on Saturday, 
Sept. 12, 1789, and had issue nine children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Rid- 
dle was a merchant in Alexandria and Richmond, Va., many years; sub- 
sequently removed to Woodville, Miss., where he was postmaster, and 
where he died in 1844. His wife died in Alexandria, April 24, 1810. Mr. 
Riddle was quite tall and well formed, had dark gray or blue eyes, and 
brown hair which he wore in a cue. He was of gentlemanly and refined 
appearance, — very good-looking. 

Joshua Riddle 4 (1), seventh son of James 3 (2), was born Aug. 15, 
1766 ; married a Miss Harper, and was a merchant in Alexandria, Va. 

Samuel Riddle 4 (1), eighth son of James 3 (2), was born Feb. 1, 1771 ; 
married a Miss Stewart, settled in Huntingdon County, Penn., and be- 
came an eminent lawyer. He studied law with his brother James, and 
was admitted to the bar in 1790. After his admission he removed to 
Huntingdon, and subsequently to Bedford, where he remained until the 
spring of 1794, when he went to Chambersburgh, and occupied his 
brother's office, succeeding to a great share of the practice held by 
him before he was appointed judge. He was very industrious and pains- 
taking, and having been introduced to the people by so distinguished 
a lawyer as his brother, he was successful in business and acquired a for- 
tune. He was a man of very speculative turn of mind, and wasted his 



212 RIDDLES OF YORK COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA. 

large fortune by injudicious investments and improvements. When liv- 
ing at Bedford, lie built a very large brick house, much too large for the 
wants of any family. He also, at a subsequent period, planted a peach- 
orchard, on the top of " Parnel's Knob," a high peak of the Kittanning 
mountain, about ten miles west of Chambersburgh, and built a still-house 
for the manufacture of peach-brandy at the same elevated locality. He 
also erected a chopping-mill and saw-mill at the same place, and thus gave 
it the name of "Riddle's Folly." Mr. Riddle was an ardent Federalist, 
and upon the establishment of a Democratic paper at Chambersburgh, in 
1790, he took umbrage at some item published in its columns, and made 
an attempt to cowhide the editors in their sanctum, but got the worst of 
the battle ; hence there was one Democratic victory in Franklin County 
that year. In person, Mr. Riddle was tall and spare, and had a very 
prominent arched nose. He was social and engaging in his manners, and 
a general favorite among those who were acquainted with him. He died 
in 1820, leaving a large family of children, of whom hereafter. 

George Riddle 4 (1), ninth son of James 8 (2), was born in Adams 
County, Penn., Dec. 1, 1772; settled in the eastern part of his native 
State as a farmer, and lived with his brother David, before mentioned, till 
a great age. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

Margaret Riddle 5 (1), eldest daughter of John 4 (3). was born May 
20, 1779, and died May 7, 1781. 

Rebecca Riddle 5 (1), second daughter of John 4 (3), was born Feb. 16, 
1781 ; was married to Willoughby Lane, of Charleston, Va., and had issue 
several children. 

James-McKee Riddle 5 (4), eldest son of John 4 (3), was born July 24, 
1785 ; married Elizabeth Weaver, of Adams County, Penn., Nov. 21, 
1811 ; studied law with his uncle, Samuel Riddle, at Huntingdon, Penn., 
settled at Somerset and practised his profession there for several years. 
He removed to the city of Pittsburgh, about 1814. He had a commission 
from Governor Findlay, dated Aug. 1, 1814, as colonel of a Pennsylvania 
militia regiment; one from the same Governor, dated March 3, 1818, as 
clerk of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania ; one from Governor Wolf, 
dated Dec. 8, 1830, as Justice of the Peace for the town (now city) of 
Allegheny, to which place he removed in 1829, and where he died March 
20, 1832. His widow died at same place, March 27, 1857; they had 
issue, of whom hereafter. 

Joseph Riddle 5 (2), a son of John 4 (3), died unmarried. 



James Riddle 5 (5), eldest son of James 4 (3), was born in Franklin 
County, Penn., about the year 1784, and died young. 

Eliza Riddle 5 (1), eldest daughter of James 4 (3), was born in Frank- 
lin County, Penn., (say) 1784, and died unmarried. She was one of the 
most pious and intellectual of young women ; cultured, refined, and of 
delicate modesty. 

Jollll-Stewart Riddle 5 (4), second son of James 4 (3), was born in 1803; 

married to Miss Bemis, of Meadville, Penn., and had issue several 

children, of whom hereafter. He died in 1851. Mr. Riddle was a gradu- 
ate of Union College, New York; studied law and removed to Meadville, 
where he was one of the most prominent men at the bar. He was a 
gentleman of prejiossessing personal appearance; courteous and genial- 



MIDDLES OF YOUK C0UN1Y, PENNSYLVANIA. 213 

hearted, and highly respected by all who came within the circle of his 
acquaintance ; his death was deeply lamented. 

Margaret Riddle 5 (2), second daughter of James 4 (3), was born Dec. 
21, 1805 ; was married June 30, 1836, to the Rev. B. S. Schneck, pastor 
of the German Reformed Church, at Chambersburgh, Penn., and for 
many years editor of the Messenger, the organ of the German Reformed 
Church. He died in 1874, in his 69th year. 

William Riddle 5 (2), third son of James 4 (3), was born in 1805 ; 
married Miss Margaret McDowell, of Franklin County, Penn. He died 
at Chambersburgh in 1838, while preparing himself for the gospel minis- 
try ; a young man of remarkable natural gifts, an excellent scholar, and 
of charming personal address. 

Horace-Ross Riddle 5 (1), fourth son of James 4 (3), was born in 1810; 
married Miss Sallie Hunter, of Virginia, and had issue three daughters. 
Mr. Riddle is now a merchant in Baltimore, Md. ; is said to be " a very 
eccentric old gentleman "; has never replied to my inquiries. 

Dr. Edward Riddle 5 (1), fifth son of James 4 (3), was born in 1813; 
studied medicine ; went to California to practise his profession, and died 
in San Francisco in 1848, unmarried. 



James-N. Riddle 5 (6), eldest son of William 4 (1), was born at Mar- 
tinsburgh, Va., Jan. 25, 1796 ; married and had issue six children ; he 
died May 10, 1863. 

William-N. Riddle 5 (3), second son of William 4 (1), was born in 
Martinsburgh, Va., April 10, 1800; married , and is now (1884) liv- 
ing in Martinsburgh, a widower, aged 84 ; no children. 

John Riddle 5 (5), third son of William 4 (1), was born at Martins- 
burgh, Va,, Jan. 25, 1803 ; married to Susan Tabb, March 6, 1828 ; moved 
from Martinsburgh to Ely, Ralls County, Mo., in the year 1836, as a 
farmer. When he entered upon his new land "the wild grass was grow- 
ing rank and tall upon the broad prairie, and the red deer fed unscared 
by the presence of man." He was an ordained elder of the church at 
West Ely ; assisted in the building of the house of worship there, and 
his name rests under the corner-stone. He died April 14, 1845, leaving a 
widow and eight children, of whom hereafter. 

Rev. David-H. Riddle 5 (2), d. d., ll. d., fourth son of William 4 (1), 
was born in Martinsburgh, Va. (now Western Virginia), April 14, 1805; 
married November, 1828, Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Matthew Brown, 
d. c, who was president of Jefferson College from 1823 to 1845, and by her 
(who died Dec. 3, 1858) had issue nine children, of whom hereafter. 
Mr. Riddle entered Jefferson College, Pennsylvania, in 1821 ; was grad- 
uated in 1823, valedictorian of a class numbering thirty-three, eighteen 
of whom became ministers. Pie studied theology at Princeton Seminary 
from 1825 to 1828 ; was licensed to preach in 1827 ; ordained and installed 
as pastor of the Presbyterian Church in Winchester, Va., Dec. 28, 1828. 
He removed to Pittsburgh, Penn., to become pastor of the Third Presby- 
terian Church there in the fall of 1833, and remained until the spring of 
1857, when he became pastor of the First Reformed Dutch Church, of Jer- 
sey City, N. J., where he continued until the close of the year 1862, at 
which time he was elected president of Jefferson College. At the union 
of Washington and Jefferson Colleges, in 1865, he became professor of 
moral science. In 1868 he removed to Martinsburgh, to take the pastoral 
care of the Presbyterian church there, where he still is (1884). He was 



214 RIDDLES OF YORK COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA. 

moderator of the Presbyterian General Assembly in 1852. Dr. Riddle is 
a man of great learning and elevated character ; has been a writer 
of marked ability, and has delivered many able lectures. Few men have 
been more highly honored in their profession, or won the esteem of so 
wide a circle of friends. 

Catherine Riddle 5 (2), the only daughter of William 4 (1), was mar- 
ried to William Stone, a planter, of McLennan County, Tex., and died in 
1868, without issue. 

Nancy Riddle 5 (1), eldest daughter of Joseph 4 (1), was born in Mar- 
tinsburgh, Va., Dec. 26, 1791 ; was married to Dr. George Watson, of 
Richmond, Va., May 16, , and died Jan. 15, 1882. 

Maria Riddle 5 (1), second daughter of Joseph 4 (1), was born in Shep- 
herdstown, Va., Sept. 3, 1793 ; died Jan. 6, 1794, in Alexandria. 

James-Dahl Riddle 5 (7), eldest son of Joseph 4 (1), was born in 
Alexandria, Va., Jan. 17, 1796, and died in Charlestown, Va., in 1825. 

Eliza-Mitchell Riddle 5 (2), third daughter of Joseph 4 (1), was born 
in Alexandria, Va., Jan. 2, 1799, and died at Ionia (the country residence 
of Dr. George Watson), Louisa County, July 22, 1879. Never married. 

John-Adams Riddle 5 (6), second son of Joseph 4 (1), was born in 
Alexandria, Va., July 3, 1800 ; married to Miss Susan Tabb, of Matthews 
County, July 8, 1823, and resided at Gloucester City, Va. He died July 
29, 1823, twenty-one days after his marriage. 

Jnlia-Maria Riddle 5 (1), fourth daughter of Joseph 4 (1), was born in 
Alexandria, Va., July 27, 1802; was married to Dr. Thomas Nelson, of 
Richmond, and died May 16, 1870, in Baltimore, Md. 

Joseph Riddle 5 (3), third son of Joseph 4 (1), was born in Alexandria, 
Va., Jan. 24, 1804, and died Feb. 11, 1808. 

Jane Riddle 5 (2), fourth daughter of Joseph 4 (1), was born in Alex- 
andria, Va., Aug. 8, 1805 ; was married to William Ried ; secondly to 
Payne, and is living at Luna Landing, Ark. She has issue. 

Robert Riddle 5 (2), fourth son of Joseph 4 (1), was born in Alexan- 
dria, Va., Nov. 1, 1806; lived in Vicksburg, Miss.; married a lady of 
that place, and had one son, of whom hereafter. Died April 14, 1841. 

Sarah-Arianna Riddle 5 (1), fifth daughter of Joseph 4 (1), was born 
in Alexandria, Va., July 27, 1808 ; was married to Dr. William A. Sel- 
don, of Charles City County, May 16, 18 — , and had issue. 

Joseph Riddle 5 (4), fifth son of Joseph 4 (1), was born in Alexandria, 
Va., April 8, 1810, and was killed in Mississippi by falling from his horse. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

George-Ross Riddle 6 (2), eldest son of James 5 (4), was born at Som- 
erset, Penn., Sept. 12, 1812; was married to Mary-Ann Williams, May 
19, 1836, and has issue eight children, of whom hereafter. Mrs. Riddle's 
parents, Henry and Elizabeth (Jones) Williams, were natives of Wales. 
Mr. Riddle moved to Pittsburgh, Penn., with his father in 1814, and in 
1819 to Allegheny, in which city and neighborhood he has resided ever 
since. He was commissioned town-clerk of Allegheny City in 1834, and 
held the position till 1839; was principal deputy (acting sheriff) under 
three sheriffs, for Allegheny County : was elected chief clerk of the civil 
courts of the same County from 1843 to 1846; had a commission (having 
been elected) from Governor Bigler, dated Feb. 4, 1854, as alderman of 
the city of Allegheny; also, another commission (having been elected) 



MIDDLES OF YORK COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA. 215 

from Governor Hartranft, dated April 25, 1876, as Justice of the Peace 
for Spring Dale Township, which he resigned when he returned to Alle- 
gheny City. He was for twenty-five years the senior partner of a firm 
largely engaged in shipping coal, which business was discontinued in 
1877. Mr. Riddle had learned the business of a conveyancer, and since 
his return from his residence at Spring Dale to Allegheny City, he has 
opened an office on Ohio Street for the transaction of that business. He 
is an excellent penman. Has kindly furnished much information for this 
book that could not have been otherwise obtained. 

Mary-Allll-Lane Kiddle 6 (2), eldest daughter of James 5 (4), was born 
at Somerset, Penn., Aug. 6, 1814; was married to Robert H. Stewart, of 
Lincoln Station, Spring Dale post-office. No issue. 

Ariaillia-Rebecea Riddle 6 (1), second daughter of James 5 (4), was 
born at Pittsburgh, Penn., Jan. 28, 1816; was married to Dr. Robert B. 
Mowrey, of Allegheny City, and has issue several children, one of whom 
is the Rev. Philip H. Mowrey, of Chester, Penn. 

John-Weaver Riddle 6 (7), second son of James 5 (4), was born at 
Pittsburgh, Penn., Jan. 15, 1818; married to Eliza Adams, of Milford, 
Eng., Sept. 24, 1841, and had issue eleven children, of whom hereafter. 
Mr. Riddle is a banker; was cashier of the Allegheny Savings Bank, but 
since its suspension he moved to Quincy, 111., where he now (1879) resides. 

Joseph-Ken Riddle 6 (5), third son of James 5 (4), was born at Pitts- 
burgh, Penn., May 18, 1825; went to California, and died at New Wil- 
mington, British Columbia; unmarried. 

William Riddle 6 (4), third son of James 5 (4), was born in Pittsburgh, 
Penn. (presumably), and died in infancy. 

Albert Riddle 6 (1), fourth son of James 5 (4), was born in Pittsburgh, 
Perfn. (presumably), and died in infancy. 



Arianna-S. Riddle 6 (2), a daughter of John 5 (5), was born (presum- 
ably) at Meadville, Penn. (where her father was in law-practice), and was 
married to Thomas B. Kennedy, Esq., a lawyer of prominence, and pres- 
ident of the Cumberland Valley and other railroad companies. They re- 
side at Chambersburgh, Penn. 

Slisan-Nonne Riddle 6 (1), eldest daughter of James 5 (6), was born in 
Martinsburgh, Va., in 1834 (?). 

Elizabeth Riddle 6 (1), second daughter of James 5 (6), was born in 
Martinsburgh, Va., in 1836; was married to Cornelius K. Stribling, and 
has four children ; now a widow in Martinsburgh. 

Charles-Stuart Riddle 6 (1), son of James 5 (6), was born in Martins- 
burgh, Va., in 1839, and died in Jefferson College, Nov. 16, 1857. 

Mary-Brown Riddle 6 (3), third daughter of James 5 (6), was born in 
Martinsburgh, Va. ; was married ; deceased. 

Jane Riddle 6 (3), fourth daughter of James 5 (6), was born in Martins- 
burgh, Va.; was married to Armstrong, and is now (1884) a widow 

living in her native city. 

Riddle 6 (0), youngest son of James 5 (6), was born in Martins- 
burgh, Va. ; served with distinction in the Confederate army, and was 
killed in September, 1864. 

Martha-Susan Riddle 6 (1), eldest daughter of John 5 (5), was born in 
Martinsburgh, Va., Dec. 15, 1828; was married to Samuel M. Elliott, 
April 8, 1854. 



216 RIDDLES OF YOUR COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA. 

Williain-Tabb Riddle 6 (5), eldest son of John 5 (5), was born in Mar- 
tinsburgh, Va., Dec. 20, 1830; married, Feb. 8, 1853, to Sarah E. Wilkin- 
son, and lias issue (1873) seven children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Kiddle 
resides at Rensselaer, Ralls County, Mo. 

Catherine-]?. Riddle"' (3), second daughter of John 5 (5), was born in 
Martinsburgh, Va., Dec. 9, 1832. 

Josenll-N. Riddle 6 (6), second son of John 5 (5), was born in Martins- 
burgh, Va., Nov. 23, 1834. 

Mary-M. Riddle 6 (4), third daughter of John 5 (5), was born near 
West Ely, Mo., April 3, 1837. 

Elizabetli-F. Riddle 6 (2), fourth daughter of John 5 (5), was born in 
Ralls County, Mo., March 18, 1839. 

Lovillia-Anderson Riddle 6 (1), fifth daughter of John 5 (5), was born 
in Ralls County, Mo., Feb. 19, 1841 ; she has been a teacher in the public 
schools; was living with her mother in 1873, unmarried. In a communi- 
cation forwarded to me in 1873, Miss Riddle says: "I am the only one in 
our family inclined to a profession. I have taught for many years ; have 
found much pleasure in my avocation, but like all earthly things rind it an 
empty bubble. I am stopping at home with my mother now, and have a 
very good opportunity to study botany, geology, etc., besides the delight- 
ful pleasure of green fields to rest my eyes upon. 1 love every voice of 
nature, even to the chirp of the little cricket that my mother searches for 
with so much energy to demolish from her carpets and woolens." Her 
composition is elegant. 

David-Hoge Riddle 6 (3), third son of John 5 (5), was born in Ralls 
County, Mo., Dec. 18, 1843 ; dead. 



Mary-Brown Riddle 6 (5), eldest daughter of David 5 (2), was born in 
Winchester, Va. (now West Virginia) ; died in infancy. 

YYilliani-N. Riddle 6 (6), eldest son of David 5 (2), was born at Win- 
chester, Va., and died in the year 1836, in childhood. 

SllSau-N. Riddle 6 (2), second daughter of David 5 (2), was born at 
Winchester, Va., Nov. 1, 1834; now (1884) living in Martinsburgh, West 
Va. ; unmarried. 

Rev. Matthew-Brown Riddle 6 (1), o. d., second son of David 5 (2), 

was born (presumably) in Pittsburgh, Penn., Oct. 17, 1836; entered Jef- 
ferson College in 1850; was graduated in 1852, salutatorian ; studied the- 
ology at Western Theological Seminary, Allegheny, Penn., 1853-6; assist- 
ant professor of Greek in Jefferson College, 1857-8; at New Brunswick 
Theological Seminary, 1858-60 ; in Europe in 1860-1. He was licensed 
to preach May 26, 1859; was chaplain of the three-months troops in 1861 ; 
ordained and installed pastor of the Reformed Dutch Church at Hoboken, 
N. J., April 15, 1862; removed to Newark, N. J., as pastor of Second 
Reformed Dutch Church, March 2, 1865; dismissed from the Church in 
1869; in Germany until September, 1871; has been professor of New 
Testament Exegesis, at Hartford Theological Seminary (Conn.) since 
1871, where he is now stationed. Dr. Riddle is regarded as an excellent 
scholar, and an author of great weight ; lie has accomplished a remark- 
able amount of literary work within the past few years. He was one of 
the Committee on the Revision of the Bible. 

Catherine-Burton Riddle' (4). third daughter of David 5 (2), was 
born in Pittsburgh, Penn., Feb. 26, 1839; was married to G. Bogert 
Vroom, and is now (1884) a widow. 



MIDDLES OF YORK COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA. 217 

Alexander-Brown Riddle 6 (1), third son of David 5 (2), was born in 
Pittsburgh, Penn., and died in infancy. 
Elizabeth-Herran Riddle 6 (4), fourth daughter of David 5 (2), was 

born (presumably) at Pittsburgh, Penn., Sept. 8, 1843, and was married 
to Rev. Meade C. Williams, of Sandusky, 0. ; now (1884) living at 
Princeton, 111. ; has five children. 

Rev. David-H. Riddle 6 (4), fourth son of David 5 (2), was born (pre- 
sumably) at Pittsburgh, Penn.. Jan. 28, 1845; was graduated at Jefferson 
College in 1865 ; studied theology two years at Allegheny, Penn., and one 
at Princeton; was licensed to preach in 1869, and ordained and installed 
pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Falls Church,* in Fairfax County, 
Va., in 1871. 

Henry-A. Riddle 6 (1), fifth son of David 5 (2), was born at Pitts- 
burgh, Penn., June 8, 1848 ; married Martha Hunter, and is now a mer- 
chant at Martinsburgh, W. Va. Has/bwr children, of whom hereafter. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Elizabeth Riddle 7 (6), eldest daughter of George 6 (2), was born in 
Allegheny, Penn., March 27, 1837 ; was married to Rev. William Wallace, 
May 29, 1862, and has issue six children. Mr. Wallace is pastor of the 
United Presbyterian Church, at Newville, Cumberland County, Penn. 

James-Henry Riddle 7 (8), eldest son of George (2), was born at Al- 
legheny, Penn., Feb. 24, 1839; married Rosanna Carson, of Franklin 
County, Penn., Feb. 25, 1868, and has issue four children, of whom here- 
after. Mr. Riddle resides at Spring Dale, Penn., and is a professional 
accountant and clerk. 

George-Denhnrst Riddle 7 (3), second son of George 6 (2), was born 
at Allegheny, Penn., March 13, 1841; married Elizabeth, daughter of 
Matthew and Nancy Day, Sept. 1, 1863, and has issue six children, of 
whom hereafter. Mr. Riddle was formerly in the grocery trade, in Alle- 
gheny City, but now holds the position of secretary of the Ben Franklin 
Insurance Company. 

Arianua-Rebecca Riddle 7 (3), second daughter of George 6 (2), was 
born at Allegheny, Penn., July 2, 1843 ; was married to Thomas F. Mar- 
shall (civil engineer), Nov. 17, 1871, and has issue. 

Edward-Dallas Riddle 7 (2), third son of George 6 (2), was born at 
Pittsburgh, Penn., Dec. 6, 1845 ; he is now serving as clerk, and lives at 
home ; single. 

Robert-Stewart Riddle 7 (3), fourth son of George 6 (2), was born at 
Allegheny, Penn., Feb. 6, 1848 ; he is living at home, single ; farmer. 

Joseph-Madison Riddle 7 (7), fifth son of George 6 (2), was born at 
Allegheny, Penn., Feb. 4, 1850; lives at home, a single man ; farmer. 

Mary-Ann Riddle 7 (6), third daughter of George 6 (2), was born at 
Allegheny, Penn., Jidy 6, 1852 ; unmarried. 



Williani-H. Riddle 7 (7), eldest son of John 6 (7), was born in Pitts- 
burgh, Penn., Aug. 3, 1842; married Florence Fell, of Marietta, O., May 
20, 1875 ; no issue. Mr. Riddle is a prominent banker in Pittsburgh ; 

* The author visited Falls Church during the late war and found the ancient 
structure where, tradition said, George Washington was married, in a dilapidated 
condition, and used as a stable for cavalry-horses. The old church was some dis- 
tance back from the turnpike, and in the midst of a burial-ground, after the English 
style. 



218 RIDDLES OF YOBE COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA. 

was initiated in the Allegheny Savings Bank ; thence removed to the 
Tradesman's National Bank; and is now teller in the People's National 
Hank. He is regarded as -a competent and trustworthy business-man, 
highly respected and influential. 

Albert-Findley Riddle 7 (2), second son of John 6 (6), was born in 
Pittsburgh, Perm., April 23, 1*44 ; married to Martha Ogle, of Quincy, 111., 
Jan. 24, 1864, and has three children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddle is 
superintendent of Oil Works, Butler Street, near Sharpsburgh Bridge, 
lie is an enterprising and competent man. 

Charles-Elliott Kiddle 7 (2), third son of John'' (6), was born at Pitts- 
burgh, Penn., Nov. 19, 1845; married Elizabeth Varnum, of Parker City, 
Penn., Nov. 14, 1872; she died at Parker City, July 9, 1875; no issue. 
Mr. Kiddle is an oil-merchant at Allegheny City, Penn. 

James-MeKee Riddle 7 (9), fourth son of John 6 (6), was born at 
Pittsburgh, Penn., Jan. 24, 1848 ; unmarried. He is in the brokerage 
business in Allegheny City, Penn. 

Emma- Adams Riddle 7 (1), eldest daughter of John 6 (6), was born at 
Pittsburgh, Penn., Feb. 25, 1850; was married to Lewis-Patterson Irwin, 
of Allegheny, Penn., Sept. 27, 1870, and resides in the latter city. 

Frailk-Costen Riddle 7 (1), fifth son of John 6 (6), was born at Pitts- 
burgh, Penn., May '24, 1852; traveling agent. 

John-Weaver Riddle 7 (8), sixth son of John 6 (6), was born in Pitts- 
burgh, Penn., Feb. 6, 1855; was formerly a lawyer at Allegheny City, but 
now living at Quincy, HI., whither his father's family have removed within 
a few years. Unmarried in 18=79. 

Ida Riddle 7 (1), second daughter of John 6 (6), was born at Pittsburgh, 
Penn., Nov. 3, 1856; unmarried 1879. 

Rohert-Mowrey Riddle 7 (4), eighth son of John 6 (6), was born at 
Pittsburgh, Penn., Nov. 19, 1858; he is now (1879) agent for an insurance 
company. 

Lewis-Hamnet Riddle 7 (1), ninth son of John 6 (6), was born at Pitts- 
burgh, Penn., Nov. 10, 1860; at home. 

Harry-Freemoiit Riddle 7 (1), tenth son of John 6 (6), was born at 
Pittsburgh, Penn., Nov. 15, 1861; at home. 



Alice-Holmes Riddle 7 (1), eldest daughter of William 6 (5), was born 
at Rensselaer, Mo., Dec. 5, 1853. 

Mary-V. Riddle 7 (7), second daughter of William 6 (5), was born at 
Rensselaer, Mo., Oct. 7, 1856. 

Mason- Wilkesoil Riddle 7 (1), eldest son of William 6 (5), was born 
at Rensselaer, Mo.. Aug. 15, 1859. 

Susan-Amelia Riddle 7 (4), third daughter of William 6 (5), was born 
at Rensselaer, Mo., June 25, 1864. 

Martha-Elliott Riddle 7 (2), fourth daughter of William 6 (5), was 
born at Rensselaer, Mo., May 20, 1866. 

Annie Riddle 7 (1), fifth daughter of William 6 (5), was born at Rens- 
selaer, Mo., Oct. 12, 1868. 

John-Travis Riddle 7 (9), second son of William 6 (5), was born at 
Rensselaer, Mo., July 18, 1871. 

EIGHTH GENERATION. 

Harry •('. Riddle 18 (2), eldest son of James' (8), was born at Spring 
Dale, Penn., Feb. 4, 1869. 



BID DELLS OF BED FOB D, NEW HAMFSHIBE, NO. 1. 219 

Mary Riddle 8 (8), eldest daughter of James 7 (8), was born at Spring 
Dale, Penn., Feb. 4, 1872. 

George- Ross Riddle 8 (4), second son of James 7 (8), was born at Spring 
Dale, Penn., Nov. 6, 1874. 

Rebecca-M. Riddle 8 (2), second daughter of James 7 (8), was born at 
Spring Dale, Penn., March 17, 1876. 

Walter-D. Riddle 8 (1), eldest son of George 7 (3), was born at Pitts- 
burgh, Penn., July 27, 1864. 

Evalyn Riddle 8 (1), eldest son of George 7 (3), was born in Pittsburgh, 
Penn., Nov. 17, 1866. 

Bessie Riddle 8 (1), second daughter of George 7 (3), was born at Pitts- 
burgh, Penn., Feb. 3, 1869. 

Ariaillia Riddle 8 (4), third daughter of George 7 (3), was born at Pitts- 
burgh, Penn., June 30, 1873. 

Grace Riddle 8 (1), fourth daughter of George 7 (3), was born at Pitts- 
burgh, Penn., Jan 12, 1871; died Oct. 8, 1877. 

Clarence Riddle 8 (1), second son of George 7 (3), was born at Pitts- 
burgh, Penn., Jan. 13, 1876; died Dec. 29, 1877. 



Joseph Riddle 8 (8). 

Albert Riddle 8 (3). !■ Children of Albert 7 (2), of Pittsburgh, Penn. 
Clara Riddle 8 (1). 



RIDDELLS OF BEDFORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE, NO. 1. 

[Gawk Branch.] 

Gawn Riddell 1 (1), supposed to have been born at Ballymeath, County 
Londonderry, Ireland, May 16, 1688; came to America in 1718. He 
married Mary Bell, a lady of Scottish descent (she was born in 1804), 
and had issue six children, of whom hereafter. He was a brother of 
Hugh, Robert, and John, who came over from Ireland at the same time. 
See "Riddells of Coleraine, Massachusetts," and of "Ballymeath, Ire- 
land." His name appears on a petition to the Governor of New Hamp- 
shire, for a charter for the town of Bedford, May 10, 1750; also tything- 
man in Bedford the same year. In 1750, a road was laid out from 
William Kennedy's land to the brook near "Ghan Riddell's house." In 
1751 "Gan" was constable; also took " invoice same year for 40 shillings 
old tenor." In 1753 "Gan" was surveyor of highways; in 1754, tything- 
man; in 1756, selectman and clerk of the market; in 1757, constable; in 
1759, committee to build a meeting-house; 1761, surveyor of highways; 
1770, collector of taxes; 1773, committee to examine town-accounts; 
1775, subscribed the vote about Rev. John Houston, — in all these years 
he was a taxpayer in Bedford. He lived in a house east of "Riddell's 
Mill," — which mill was owned by him in 1754, — upon the site of the 
present (1874) house of S. C. Damon, and had large tract of land, which 
he divided among his sons.* 

* During the autumn of 1876, the author of this book visited Bedford, N. H., 
and in company with John A. Riddle, Esq., a descendant in the fourth degree from 



220 BID DELLS OF BEDFOBD, NEW HAMPSHIRE, NO. 1. 

"Rev. Mr. Houston's and Gawn Riddle's farms joined each other. 
One Saturday they met and had some sharp and unneighborly talk to- 
gether about their fences and cattle. Some townsmen were present and 
heard their altercation. On the next day (Sabbath) Mr. Riddle was 
punctually at meeting. Some of his neighbors, who had heard the con- 
test on the day before, looked astonished, and said, 'Mr. Riddle, we 
thought you would not be at meeting to-day, to hear your neighbor 
Houston preach, after having such a quarrel with him.' Said Mr. Riddle, 
'I'd have ye to know, if I did quarrel with my neighbor Houston yes- 
terday, I did not quarrel with the gospel.'" — History of Bedford. He 
died Dec. 29, 1779, and his head-stone stands in the cemetery at Bedford 
Centre. The following is a facsimile of his autograjm: — 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Lieut. John Riddle 2 (1), eldest son of Gawn 1 (1), was born in Bed- 
ford, N. H., March 26, 1754; married Mary McAffee, and secondly, 
Sarah Hartshorn, and had by them eleven children, of whom hereafter. 
He built and resided in mill house, now (1884) occupied by Mr. Isaac C. 
Cutler. In 1780 he was surveyor of highways; 1781, ensign; 1784, com- 
mittee to do what shall be needful to be done on "Scataquog bridge"; 
1785, surveyor of highways and committee on county bridge ; same 
year, pew No. 4 in meeting-house sold to him for $36; 1786, tyth- 
ingman, juryman, committee to build a pound, and "lieutenant." He 
was a volunteer in the Revolution, and signed the "Association Test," 
which read as follows: "We the subscribers do hereby solemnly engage 
and promise, that we will, to the utmost of our power, at the risk of our 
lives and fortunes, with arms, oppose the hostile proceedings of the 
British Fleets and Armies against the United American Colonies." Mr. 
Riddle fulfilled his promise by entering the active service. He was a 
millwright by trade, and built nearly all the mills that were in operation 
in this section of the country at that time. He was a very industrious, 
hard-working man. He died Nov. 18, 1812. 



Gawn, visited the place where the early Ricldells settled; we climbed "Riddle's 
Hill," a beautiful elevation overlooking Bedford village, and there we could see the 
farms given by Gawn to his sons; beautiful lands now under a high state of culti- 
vation, stretching away over hills and through valleys nearly as far as the eye 
could reach. We visited the cemetery where the Riddle fathers rest, and there saw 
the elegant granite tomb, erected and owned by the family. Mr. Riddle pointed 
out to me the lands owned by the ancestors of the family, and the homes of those 
families who were intermarried with the early generations; we visited the old Rid- 
dle mansion, where several generations of this family were born, and viewed many 
relics and antique articles of furniture that had long been in the family. The por- 
traits in oil of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Riddle were seen, and a curious cane brought 
from Russia, with which Mr. Riddle walked in his latter years. This ancient 
residence is situated upon an elevated and commanding position; is large and im- 
posing, and embosomed in a beautiful grove of maples. A large green lawn sur- 
rounds the house, guarded by a circular wall of stone. The farm connected with 
this house is large and valuable, now owned and occupied by the three brothers, 
Isaac N., John A., and Silas A. Riddle; all unmarried. (See view of the Riddle 
mansion.) 







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RIDDELLS OF BEDFORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE, NO. 1. 221 

David Riddle' 2 (1), second son of Gawn 1 (1), was born in Bedford, N. 
H., in 1756; married Mary Dunlap in 1798, and had issue Jive children, 
of whom hereafter. He settled near the place of his birth, in a house he 
erected on the hill where John D. Riddle lived in 1852, north of the mill. 
He was a soldier of the Revolution, and drew a pension. In 1774-5, he 
was pound-keeper; 1786, town voted to allow him four shillings for an en- 
dorsement on a corn note. He died Dec. 18, 1889, and was buried at 
Bedford Centre. 

Susanna Riddle 2 (1), only daughter of Gawn 1 (1), was born in Bed- 
ford, N. H., 1759, and died in Bedford, Nov. 4, 1841, aged 82 years. She 
married Solomon Hutchinson ; they removed to Maine, and reared a large 
family. One child lived in Belfast. 

Hugh Riddle' 2 (1), third son of Gawn 1 (1), was born in Bedford, N. 
H., in 1761. He married Ann M. Houston, sister of Rev. John Houston, 
first minister of Bedford ; built and lived in a brick house about two miles 
south of the mill, known in 1884 as the Willard Parker house. He had 
issue seven children, and died Aug. 17, 1833. He was a soldier of the 
Revolution, entering the army when seventeen years old ; was with Gen- 
eral Stark at the battle of Bennington. 

Capt. Isaac Riddle' 2 (1), fourth son of Gawn 1 (1), was born in Bed- 
ford, N". PL, June 10, 1762 ; married, first, Ann Aiken, in 1788; secondly, 
Margaret McGaw, in 1806. He built and lived in a house near the meet- 
ing-house at Bedford, one-half mile east of what was known as " Riddle's 
Mill," now known as the "Riddle Homestead." (See plate in this book.) 
He was for many years an active, public-spirited citizen of his town ; and 
for a long time was extensively engaged in the lumber business, and one 
of the first proprietors of navigation by locks and canals on the Merri- 
mack River. He superintended the building of the canals and locks be- 
longing to the " Union Lock and Canal Company," and in company with 
Maj. Caleb Stark, he built and owned the first canal-boat that ever floated 
on the waters of the Merrimack. It was named the "Experiment "; was 
built at Bedford Centre, and drawn three miles on wheels by forty yokes 
of oxen, to "Basswood Landing," so called, at which place it was launched 
in the presence of the townspeople, who had gathered to witness the 
novelties of the day. This boat was loaded, and sailed to Boston, and 
the following notice relative to her arrival was taken from the Boston 
Centinel of 1812: "Arrived from Bedford, N. H, canal-boat 'Experi- 
ment,' Isaac Riddle, captain, via Merrimack River and Middlesex Canal." 
Upon her arrival at Boston, she was received amid cheers and the firing 
of cannon. From this commenced a large and extensive inland naviga- 
tion on the Merrimack River, which continued until 1845, when it was 
interrupted by the railroads. He built factories at Souhegan, afterwards 
called "Riddle's Village," where, in company with his sons, William P., 
James, and Isaac, under the firm-name of Isaac Riddle & Sons, he carried 
on an extensive manufacture of cotton, wool, and nails, until the estab- 
lishment was destroyed by fire in 1829. Mr. Riddle filled many offices, 
having been civil magistrate of his town, as well as their representative 
to the State Legislature. His life was a proof of his energy and active 
disposition. According to the " History of Manchester," when he became 
of age he had about fifty dollars in his pocket, mostly saved from his 
earnings during military service. He went to Newburyport, Mass., to pur- 
chase a stock of goods ; these were transported on drays, or dray-carts, 
drawn by one or two horses, — if by two horses, in tandem teams, — as 



222 F.IDDELLS OF BEDF01W, NEW HAMPSHIRE, NO. 1. 



truck- wagons were not then in use. He occupied for a store-house the 
front room of his mother's dwelling, and trade increased until he was ena- 
bled to commence the manufacture of potash. But the funds were want- 
ing to purchase a new kettle at an expense of thirty dollars. Emboldened 
by conscious integrity, without money or city friends, he started for Bos- 
ton. On arriving at Medford, he was met by Maj. John Pinkerton, who 
was a man of the same stamp, the pioneer of trade in Derry, who gave 
him a note of introduction, and the desired utensil was secured. This 
line of manufacture proved lucrative ; the potash was taken to Boston 
with ox-teams, and bartered as an article of export for imported goods. 
After some years had elapsed he purchased a lot of wild land at Bedford 
Centre, and erected a spacious mansion. By his indomitable business en- 
ergy and perseverance he added acre to acre, and farm to farm, until he 
owned lands in several towns. 

Mr. Riddle's house was literally a home for ministers, strangers, and a 
wide circle of acquaintances ; and these were entertained with a hospital- 
ity and attention only found under the influence of the old-school gentle- 
man. By generosity and many acts of kindness, he gained the respect of 
a wide-spread community. Often called upon to render pecuniary assist- 
ance, many instances are worthy of note. Judge Ebenezer Webster, of 
Salisbury, when on his way to Amherst to attend county court, usually 
passed the night at his house. On one occasion he spoke of his embar- 
rassment on account of his son Daniel, then at college, and asked assist- 
ance, which was promptly rendered by the loan of money. Being one of 
the stockholders in the Concord Bank, the officers often made application 
to him for aid in order to meet the exigencies of the times; such calls he 
always effectually answered, he frequently being obliged to make a jour- 
ney to Portsmouth, and obtain money in his private capacity. 

In 1814, during the war with Great Britain, a public call was made by 
Governor Gilman, of New Hampshire, for volunteers from that class of 
citizens who were exempt from military duty in the ranks of the militia, 
to form themselves into companies for home-defence, in case of sudden 
invasion ; this call was responded to by a veteran band of men, number- 
ing about sixty, of fifty years of age and upwards, under the command of 
Capt. Isaac Riddle. He was prepared himself for military service, as pre- 
viously intimated, as a volunteer soldier in the Revolution, under Colonel 
Nichols, and did duty at the important post of West Point, in 1780. 

About 1817, an accident occurred which is still cherished in grateful re- 
membrance. Mr. Riddle was returning from " Pembroke muster," Avhen, 
seeing a ferry-boat nearing the fatal plunge of Hooksett Falls, crowded 
with people, without a moment's pause he sprung from his chaise, plunged 
into the stream, and, when all were expecting instant death, his courageous 
arm caught the rope attached to the boat, and thus saved thirty lives. 

He had married a third wife, Mrs. Mary Vinall, of Quincy, Mass., an 
accomplished lady, belonging to one of the best families in the State, 
being a sister of the first governor, Levi Lincoln, and Captain Lincoln, 
one of the party who destroyed the tea in Boston harbor in 1773. Mrs. Rid- 
dle kept among her relic-treasures the axe with which her brother opened 
the memorable chests of tea. Mr. Riddle built a spacious mansion-house at 
Quincy, where, in the sunshine of earthly prosperity, he passed his last days. 
His death, which occurred Jan. 26, 1830, was very sudden, caused from the 
effects of a slight wound received at the time his factory was burned at 
Souhegan. He was buried with Masonic honors, and his remains interred 



BID DELLS OF SEDFOIiD, NEW HAMPSHIRE, NO. I. 223 



in the family tomb at Bedford. He had a family of eight children, of 
whom hereafter. 

William Riddle' 2 (1), fifth son of Gawn 1 (1), was born in Bedford, N. 
H., July 5, 1765; married Janet Gilchrist in 1791, and lived on a part of 
the homestead with his mother. He was upwards of twenty years town- 
treasurer, and held the office of civil magistrate. He was frequently one of 
the selectmen of the town, and was seven times its representative to the 
General Court. At one time there were rumors afloat in his town that re- 
flected upon the character of Rev. William Pickells, who had formerly 
preached in Philadelphia (a native of Wales), but then the minister in 
Bedford, where he had been very popular. The story soon created such 
bitter opposition, and the contest waxed so warm between his enemies 
and friends, that Lieut. John Orr offered to lay a wager of fifty dollars 
that the charges were true. The wager was taken by the preacher's friends, 
and William Riddle was chosen as agent for the parties, to proceed to 
Philadelphia and investigate the charges, for it was in that city where ru- 
mor located his pretended crimes. Mr. Riddle's report was to be final. 
He went to Philadelphia on horse-back, being on the journey two weeks, 
investigated the matter fully, found the charges untrue, and returning 
reported the result. There was great exultation on the part of the win- 
ners, and they gathered at the store of Isaac Riddle, Esq., to rejoice over 
the victory. Mr. Riddle was designated to go to Mr. Orr's and get the 
wager; he accordingly waited on that gentleman, and made known the 
result of his investigations. Without making a remark, Mr. Orr went to 
his money-drawer and paid the wager. Mr. Riddle took the money back 
to the winners, and it was spent at the counter in treating the company. 
Mr. Riddle was a man of great probity of character, firm, steadfast, and 
unwavering in the undertakings of life. He was a lover of peace and 
highly respected by all who knew him, always sustaining the unbounded 
confidence of his friends. He had a family of nine children, of whom 
hereafter. He died July 14, 1838, and was buried at Bedford Centre. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Oawil Riddle 3 (2), eldest son of John- (1), was born in Bedford, N. 
H., June 29, 1776; married Dollie French, had issue three children, and 
died in July, 1837, aged 61 years. He lived on a part of the homestead, 
and held many offices in town; he was selectman in 1822, '24, '25, '27, '28, 
'30, and treasurer in 1833-4; after when his name is not found on the 
Bedford records. He was a man of marked executive ability. 

Molly Riddle 3 (1), eldest daughter of John' 2 (1), was born Dec. 11, 

1778; married to Black, of Prospect, Me., in 1804, and resided in 

said town. 

Nancy Riddle 3 (1), second daughter of John 2 (1), was born Jan. 5, 
1781 ; married William French, of Prospect, Me., in 1806, and resided in 
said town ; died June 20, 1852. 

Susanna Riddle 3 (2), third daughter of John 2 (1), was born in 1784; 
married Daniel Moor in 1807, and lived in Bedford. 

James Riddle 3 (1), second son of John 2 (1), was born Jan. 9, 1786; 
married Anna Dole in 1815, had issue two children, and died in 1827, 
aged 41 years. 

Anna Riddle 3 (1), third daughter of John 2 (1), was born in May, 1789; 
married James Staples, of Prospect, Me., in 1841, and settled in said town. 



224 KWDELLS OF HEJiF.OliJ). NEW UAMPSIITBE, XO. 1. 

John Riddle 3 (2), third son of John- (1), was horn (probably) about 
1791 : died at the age of 21 ; no other information. 

Matthew Riddle 3 (1), fourth son of John 2 (1), was born (probably) 
about 17i»o ; married Sarah Dole in Ohio, in 1819 ; went West in 1820, 
and settled in Terre Haute, Ind., as cabinet-maker. He died Sept. 1, 
1828, and his wife July 9, 1844; both were buried in Greenwood Ceme- 
tery, Terre Haute. 

AVilliam Riddle 3 (2), fifth son of John 2 (1), was born (probably) about 
1795; died in 1845; no other information. 

Oilman Riddle 3 (1), sixth son of John' 2 (1), was born in July, 1811 ; 
married in 1836, Mary J. Eveleth, and secondly in 1841, Emeline Henry. 
Had a family of three children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddle has long 
been identified with manufacturing operations, and has become an owner of 
valuable real estate. He resides in Manchester, N. H., in a spacious man- 
sion on Chestnut Street. He is a man of quiet and unostentatious habits. 

Eliza-S. Riddle 3 (1), fourth daughter of John 2 (1), was born in 1813; 
married and lived at Belfast, Me. 



John-Dnnlap Riddle 3 (3), eldest son of David 2 (1), was born in Bed- 
ford, N. H., March 20, 1802 ; married Sally C. Gilmore, May 12, 1831, 
and had issue six children, of whom hereafter. Mis. Riddle died July 13, 
1852, and he married, secondly, Mary- Ann Gilmore (sister of Sally C), in 
1854, but had no issue by this union. Mr. Riddle lived many years in 
Bedford, but removed to Manchester in 1868, and died there Aug. 5, 
1876, leaving a widow and three children. He was a Justice of the Peace, 
and frequently held offices in his town; a man of considerable ability; 
highly respected by a wide circle of acquaintances. 

Hllgh Riddle 3 (2), second son of David 2 (1), was bom in Bedford, N. 
H., April 8, 1803, and died in 1849. " When young he went to Balti- 
more, Md., where he was extensively engaged in constructing the public 
works of that city. In 1837 he built the Baltimore Custom-house, and 
was largely connected with the building of the first railroads terminating 
at that place." In 1849 he started for California by the overland route, 
and in the expedition lost his life, — the manner unknown. A simple 
head-board, carved with a rude inscription, was erected to mark his rest- 
ing-place "on the plains of the Pacific." 

Martha Riddle 3 (1), eldest daughter of David 2 (1), was born in Bed- 
ford, N. II., Dec. 16, 1806 ; married Daniel Barnard, and lived in Bedford. 

Gilmail Riddle 3 (2), third son of David 2 (1), was born in Bedford, N. 
H., and died young. 

Mary Riddle 3 (1), second daughter of David 2 (1), was a twin to Gil- 
man 3 (2) ; died young. 

Grawn Riddle 3 (3), eldest son of Hugh 2 (1), was born in Bedford, N. 
H., in May, 1791 ; married Elizabeth, daughter of Lieut. James Moore, 
and settled near his father's homestead. He married, secondly, Rebecca, 
daughter of Robert Walker, one of the early settlers of Bedford ; he 
had a family of four children, of whom hereafter, and died Aug. 20, 1867, 
aged 78 years ; he was a farmer. 
"Dr. Robert Riddle 3 (I), second son of Hugh 2 (1), was born in Bed- 
ford, N.H., in 1793 ; was graduated at Yale College in 1818, studied med- 
icine, and settled in his native town. " He was considered a skilful phy- 
sician, and was fast rising in notice, when he died in the prime of life, 






\ 



* 








RID DELLS OF BEDFORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE, NO. I. 225 

Dec. 17, 1828," holding the appointment of surgeon's mate in the Bed- 
ford Grenadier Company. 

Anna Riddle 3 (2), eldest daughter of Hugh 2 (1), was born in Bedford, 
N. H., March 3, 1794; married Willard Parker, and had issue ; died Oct. 
7, 1876. 

Polly Riddle 3 (1), second daughter of Hugh" 2 (1), was born in Bed- 
ford, N. H., Feb. 12, 1796 ; married Oct. 10, 1820, to Rev. Daniel L. 
French, of Nelson, and had issue ; deceased. 

Sally Riddle 3 (1), third daughter of Hugh 2 (1), was born in Bedford, 
N. H., Nov. 7, 1799 ; married in 1842 to Cot Daniel Gould, and lived in 
Manchester. Still living, — the only one of her generation (1884). 

Susanna Riddle 3 (3), fourth daughter of Hugh 2 (1), was born in 
Bedford, N. H, Oct. 10, 1801 ; married to Dea. Robert Boyd, of London- 
derry, and had issue; died Jan. 21, 1849. 

Jane Riddle 3 (1), fifth daughter of Hugh 2 (1), was born in Bedford, 
N. H., Sept. 11, 1804; married Eleazer, son of Dea. Richard Dole, in 
1825, had issue, and died March 24, 1834. 



Gen. William-Pickels Riddle 3 (2), eldest son of Isaac 2 (1), was born 
in Bedford, N. H., April 6, 1789; married Miss Sarah, daughter of Capt. 
John Ferguson, of Dunbarton, in 1824, and had issue seven children, of 
whom hereafter. His boyhood was passed at home, at the district school, 
and about his father's business, in which he early displayed aptness and 
activity. At Atkinson Academy, under Professor Vose, he acquired all 
the advanced education that it was his privilege in those days to receive, 
and subsequently, for a short time, he taught school in his native town. 
In 1811, Mr. Riddle located in Piscataquog, a village of considerable en- 
terprise in Bedford, situated on the Merrimack River, and now a part of 
the city of Manchester. There he first took charge of his father's busi- 
ness affairs ; business soon increased in importance, which led to the for- 
mation of the firm of Isaac Riddle & Sons. This firm extended its business 
operations throughout central New England. They owned and carried on 
stores, warehouses, lumber-yards, saw- and grist-mills, at Boston, Bedford 
Centre, and at Piscataquog; and operated cotton and nail factories, and 
lumber and grain mills on the Souhegan at Merrimack. 

In the latter place they erected dwelling-houses, stores, and a hotel, 
whence it became to be known as " Riddle's Village," and was a thriving 
place. 

During this time the construction of the " Union Locks and Canals " on 
the Merrimack River was inaugurated, an enterprise which rendered that 
river navigable for boats and barges from Amoskeag to Lowell, making 
connections between Concord and Boston. With this achievement Mr. 
Riddle became personally identified, manifesting zeal and foresight in a 
remarkable degree. Taking advantage of the facilities thus afforded for 
inland navigation, the firm of Isaac Riddle & Sons established a line of 
canal-boats, and in connection with their other extensive business opera- 
tions, entered actively into the carrying trade. This business was con- 
tinued by Mr. Riddle after the dissolution of the firm, and until the open- 
ing of the Nashua and Concord Railroad. 

At the decease of his father the old firm was dissolved, and Mr. Riddle 

assumed and carried on the business thereafter, both at Merrimack and in 

Bedford, on his own account. He supplied the surrounding countr ywith 

merchandise, and from his extensive wood-lots and water-powers, and 

15 



226 EIDDELLS OF BJBDFOBD, NEW BAMPSBTRE, NO. 1. 

by way of purchase, he furnished round and manufactured lumber, 
largely for the cities of Nashua, Lowell, Newburyport, Boston, and sup- 
plied the navy-yard at Charlestown with spars and ship-timber; Boston 
and Lowell with lumber for public buildings and bridges; the railroads of 
New England with ties and contract stuff, and the island of Cuba with 
its railroad sleepers. 

During this period of his business activity he also dealt extensively in 
hops, marketing them in Boston', New York, and Philadelphia, and in 
some instances shipping them abroad.. Thus his mercantile enterprh 
and ventures continued till his retirement in I860, having exercised a di- 
versified, energetic, and busy life, for upwards of half a century. In 184s 
he erected the Piscataquog Steam Mills, and successfully operated them 
for several years. About this time he received the appointment of gen- 
eral inspector of hops for the State of New Hampshire, the cultivation of 
which having become a matter of importance to the farmers of the Slate. 
In this capacity he was widely known and respected among the hop-grow- 
ers and merchants of New England. 

Quite early in life Mr. Riddle showed a taste for military affairs. At 
the age of twenty-five years he organized a company called the "Bedford 
Grenadiers," and was chosen its first captain. This was in 1815. He 
commanded this company about five years, when he was promoted to the 
rank of major in the "Old Ninth" Regiment, New Hampshire Militia (May 
13, 1820). The next year he received further promotion to the lieutenant- 
colonelcy, and in June, 1824, became, through promotion, the colonel of 
his regiment, and commanded it for seven years. Thence he was briga- 
dier-general, and on the 25th of June, 1838, was promoted to major-gen- 
eral of the division, which military office he held, with high commenda- 
tions, till his resignation. Thus he had encompassed all the offices of 
military rank, from a fourth corporal to a major-general. 

Under his command the "Old Ninth" Regiment was composed of ten 
full companies of infantry, two rifle companies, one artillery company, 
and one cavalry company, and by him was brought to a high state of dis- 
cipline and efficiency; in reputation ranking first in the State. 

In civil life, also, Mr. Riddle held offices of trust; was moderator at 
the town-meetings, representative to the State Legislature, county road- 
commissioner, trustee of institutions, on committees of public matters ; 
but from constant pressure of business affairs he was often obliged to de- 
cline offices tendered him. In 1820, he was chairman of the committee 
appointed to build Piscataquog meeting-house, and twenty years later he 
was chiefly instrumental in remodeling it into an academy, of which he 
was trustee during its existence. In public education he always took a 
lively interest, fostering and promoting its advancement in every practical 
way ; whether the common school, the academy, or the college, he warmly 
advocated and upheld the claims of each, and was patron of all. 

As the town's committee he constructed the large bridge- across the 
Merrimack River, — matters of public interest in these days. — and was 
president of the Granite Bridge Co., which erected the long lattice-bridge 
at Merrill's Falls, connecting the town with the city of Manchester. He 
also superintended the reconstruction of the large McGregor bridge, below 
Amoskeag Falls. 

In Masonry, too, Mr. Kiddle was pre-eminent and active in his time. 
He became a member of the Masonic order in 1823, and in the following 
year assisted in founding the Lafayette Lodge, being one of the chartered 



RIDDELLS OF BEDFORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE, NO. 1. 227 

members. To the support and maintenance of this lodge, Mr. Riddle 
contributed liberally in funds and effort; giving free use of a hall for 
twenty-five years for its meetings. He was, in 1874, the only surviving 
one of its early projectors. During anti-mason times, this lodge was one 
of the very few in the State which kept its "altar-fires alive," and held 
regular communications unbroken. He was also a member of Mt. Horeb 
Chapter, and a member of Trinity Commandery of Knights Templars. 

Amid the varied activities of a busy life, agriculture received no small 
share of his attention, owning several farms, which he cultivated with 
success, experimenting with crops and giving results to the public. He 
was a patron of the State and County fairs, gave much thought to im- 
proved methods of farming, and in many ways strove to aid in the ad- 
vancement of the best interests of agriculture. The growing of hops was 
a specialty with him, and he carried it to highly successful results, estab- 
lishing theories of his own, and generally improving the grade and quality 
of the hops raised in the State. 

After the incorporation of the city of Manchester, and when military 
interests were dormant throughout the State, General Riddle organized 
the Amoskeag Veterans, — a military association composed of many of 
the most prominent and enterprising men of the city at that time. This 
was in the year 1854. Out of this association a battalion was formed, 
and General Riddle chosen commander. The success of this movement 
awakened the military spirit of the State, and soon after the whole mili- 
tary system was re-established and vitalized. The Veterans uniformed in 
Continental style, and upon parade presented a unique and attractive 
appearance. Its first public display worthy of mention was in Boston, on 
the occasion of a celebration of the Battle of Bunker Hill, at Charlestown. 
This assured its reputation. 

In the fall of 1855, upon the invitation of President Pierce, the Amos- 
keag Veterans visited Washington, and became guests at the White 
House, freely enjoying its hospitality and receiving official honors. While 
there it made a notable pilgrimage to the Tomb of Washington, at Mt. 
Vernon. On its return homeward the battalion created much enthusiasm 
in the cities through which it passed ; the stalwartness and martial bear- 
ing of the Veterans, the quaintness of their uniform, and their soldierly 
demeanor, attracted public notice. At Baltimore, Philadelphia, and New 
York, it received especial attention and entertainment. During the late 
war the Veterans evinced patriotism by volunteering their services to 
the Governor of New Hampshire. The corps exists to-day, highly hon- 
ored and generally respected as one of the institutions among the " Gran- 
ite Hills." 

Mr. Riddle, though not a politician, always took manifest interest in 
the politics of the country. At first a staunch Whig, and subsequently an 
earnest Republican. He believed in advanced party principles, but had 
little regard for mere party policies. He ardently supported the Consti- 
tution and the Union, and ever upheld the integrity of the country. He 
respected the constitutional rights of all sections, and sought to sustain 
justice and freedom always and everywhere. Liberty of thought, speech, 
and action were fundamental with him. During the late Rebellion he 
was an earnest supporter of the government, and welcomed peace and 
the results of the war as a harbinger of a redeemed and glorified republic. 

In religious faith Mr. Riddle was a Unitarian, though born of Scotch- 
Presbyterian parentage, and bred under such influences. His intellectual 



2:28 HIDDELLS OF BEDFORD, NEW IfAMl'SII/IiE, NO. 1. 

force and independence led him to more liberal views and a broader faith. 
He was prominent among the early founders of the Unitarian Church at 
Manchester, and took much personal interest in its success. Charitable of 
the opinions of others, he was consistent in his own. 

Not the least among the varied talents of General Kiddle was his musi- 
cal proficiency, both as a choir leader and instrumental performer at Bed- 
ford for twenty years. 

Hospitable and courteous always, he enjoyed the society of good ami 
cultivated men ; liberality and generosity were traits of his character ; to 
tlic appeals of the poor and unfortunate he turned not away. In private 
life he was greatly respected, and fully sustained the confidence of his fel- 
low-men ; in public life he was identified with every good and worthy un- 
dertaking. In church, and state, and society, ever present with aid and 
encouragement. Integrity, probity, and energy marked his whole career. 
Few men of his generation have lived more efficient lives, and few have 
left behind a deeper impress or a broader record of usefulness and enter- 
prise for a memorial. Mr. Riddle died at his residence in Piscataquog 
Village, May 18, 1875, aged 82 years. He was buried with masonic and 
military honors, and his remains deposited in the family tomb at Bedford. 
The portrait of Mr. Riddle, in this book, was furnished by his sons. 

James Riddle 3 (2), second son of Isaac- (1), was born in Bedford, N. 
H., June 26, 1791 ; married in 1810, Charlotte Farmer, sister of the dis- 
tinguished antiquary; this lady was born July 20, 1792, and died while 
on a visit to Quincy in 1828. She was a beautiful and amiable woman. 
In 1829 he married Laura, daughter of Solomon Barker, of Pelham (she 
was born Jan. 11, 1802, and died March 4, 1831), and thirdly, in 1833, he 
married Eliza Hunt (she was born May 6, 1807), who survived him, and 
resides in Nashua. Mr. Riddle died Nov. 24, 1840, aged 49 years ; he 
had issue five children, of whom hereafter. He was for many years en- 
gaged in business with his father and brothers, being a member of the firm 
of Isaac Riddle & Sons ; was a man of activity and good business capac- 
ity, and largely interested in staging before the days of railroads. 

Isaac Riddle 3 (2), third son of Isaac 2 (1) and Ann Aiken, was born 
in Bedford, N. H., July 25, 1793; married, Sept. 30, 1818, Betsey, 
daughter of Dea. Phineas Aiken, of Bedford, and sister of Rev. Silas Ai- 
ken, sometime of Park-street Church, Boston, Mass., and by her, — who 
died Oct. 21, 1843, — had issue five children, of whom hereafter. He mar- 
ried, secondly, Mrs. Ursula (Smith) Aubin, of Newburyport, Mass., by 
whom he had one child, who died in infancy. 

Mr. Riddle acquired his education in the public schools of his native 
town, and the academies at Bradford and at Atkinson, N. H., and then, 
with his father and two brothers, formed the firm of Isaac Riddle & Sons, 
which carried on business at Piscataquog Village, Bedford, and Merri- 
mack, N. EL, and Boston, Mass. They assisted in constructing the Union 
Locks and Canals, one of the links in the chain which connected Concord 
with Boston. Dams and locks, for the passage of boats, were built on 
Merrimack River, at Merrill's Falls, in Manchester; Griffin's, Short, Goffe's, 
and Coos, in Bedford; and Moore's and Cromwell's, in Merrimack, — at 
an expense of about 880,000. They built and launched the first canal-boat 
which made the trip, and established a daily line of them. This company 
owned saw-mills, grist-mills, and extensive tracts of valuable woodland ; 
they run what was supposed to have been the first nail-making machine 
north of Boston ; they dealt largely in potash, hops, and produce. 





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BIDDELLS OF BEDFORD, NEW HAMPSHIBE, NO. 1. 229 

When Mr. Riddle entered the firm with his father and brothers, he lo- 
cated in Boston to manage the department of business there, having his 
office at their boat-house, at the end of the canal, which at that time ran 
through Canal Street (having given it that name) to Haymarket Square, 
and down Blackstone Street to the harbor. After the senior member of 
the firm gave up his share in the business, and removed to Quincy, Mass., 
Isaac Kiddle, Jr., returned to Bedford, and his brother David took his place 
in the Boston office. Upon the death of Mr. Riddle's father, in 1830, the 
firm dissolved, and the business was divided, but he continued at Bedford. 
After disposing of his store, Mr. Riddle devoted himself to agriculture, — 
owning a valuable farm in Bedford, — and to land-surveying, being a pro- 
fessional of accuracy and great experience. 

While living in Bedford, Mr. Riddle always manifested a lively inter- 
est in town affairs, and was prominently identified with public issues in 
general. He was postmaster for upwards of twenty years, and served 
in the Old Ninth Regiment of Militia, as adjutant, and subsequently as 
major. 

About 1843 he built a fine large residence on Lowell Street, in Man- 
chester, and removed to that city, — to which he had previously driven 
daily to attend to his business there, — and established himself as a real- 
estate broker. At the first sale of land by the Amoskeag Company, in 
1838, he purchased a lot on Elm Street, between Concord and Lowell 
Streets, and erected the wooden building now standing there, which con- 
tained windows taken from the ancient church at Quincy, Mass. (which 
had been purchased by Isaac Riddle, Sr., and shipped to Manchester), 
through which John Adams and John-Quincy Adams, Presidents of the 
United States, used to look out, many years ago. At a subsequent sale 
of land Mr. Riddle bought two lots on Amherst Street, and located his 
office there. The block known as Riddle's Building (now owned by his 
son) he purchased subsequently of its builder, Ira Ballou. 

He was a civil and police justice, and in these capacities did consider- 
able business ; was one of a committee to secure the incorporation of the 
city of Manchester, and assisted in founding the Manchester Bank, of 
which he was a director; was president of the Amoskeag Fire Insurance 
Company, and director of the Manchester Scale Company. He always 
manifested a deep interest in education, and was prominent in movements 
for the advancement of knowledge in Manchester, before the consolidation 
of the school-districts, and was on a committee to build the school-house 
at the corner of Union and Merrimack Streets. 

Mr. Riddle acquired a large property in business, but was sometimes 
a heavy loser by the misfortunes of those he aided by his endorsements. 
He was widely known as an enterprising business man and public-spirited 
citizen, and when he died, Oct. 3, 1875, he was greatly missed. He was 
a typical representative of the sterling Scotch-Irish stock, and a gentle- 
man of the old school. Of sound judgment, cautious, and conservative, 
his opinions were weighty, and his executions usually successful. Pos- 
sessing great kindness of heart and tenderness of spirit, he was quickly 
moved at the appeal of the deserving, and generous in responding sub- 
stantially to the calls of the needy. His remains were deposited in the 
family tomb at Bedford. 

The excellent portrait of Mr. Riddle, engraved on steel expressly for 
this book, was kindly donated by his eldest son and namesake, Isaac 1ST. 
Riddle, of Bedford, N. H. 



230 BIDDELLS OF BEDFORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE, SO. 1. 

Oilman Kiddle 3 (3), fourth son of Isaac 2 (1), was born in Bedford, 
X. H., Nov. 28, 1795, and died Oct. 8, 1799. 

David Riddle 3 (2), fifth son of Isaac- (1), was born in Bedford, 1ST. 
H., Aug. 27, 1797. He entered Dartmouth College in 1814, but retired 
therefrom on account of ill-health, and made a voyage to Russia in 1815 ; 
married Marv Lincoln in 1826, and lived at Merrimack. He was engaged 
in business at the Boston house of the firm of Isaac Riddle & Sons. Mr. 
Riddle died July 23, 1835, after which his family removed to Hingham, 
where they were living in 1852; he had issue four children. 

Jacob-McGaw Riddle 3 (1), sixth son of Isaac 2 (1), and eldest child of 
his second wife, was born in Bedford, X. H., Dec. 30, 1807. He was ed- 
ucated at the Military Academy, Norwich, Vt. ; was a mariner by profes- 
sion, and was lost at sea, Sept. 21, 1835, on his fifth voyage, being first 
mate of the new brig " Washington," of Boston, bound for Cadiz. No 
family. 

Margaret-Ann Riddle 3 (1), eldest daughter of Isaac 2 (1), was born in 
Bedford, X. H., July 7, 1809; married in 1830, to Gen. Joseph C. Ste- 
vens, of Lancaster, Mass., and had issue ; died at Lancaster, Mass., April 
6, 1881. 

Rebecca Riddle 3 (1), second daughter of Isaac 2 (1) by his second 
wife, was born in Bedford, X. H., Aug. 13, 1811 ; died Aug. 9, 1812. 



Polly Riddle 3 (2), eldest daughter of William 2 (1), was born in Bed- 
ford, X. H., June 22, 1792; died^March 19, 1819. She was the first wife 
of Dr. P. P. Woodbury. See Martha 3 (2). 

William Riddle 3 (i), eldest son of William 2 (1), was born in Bedford, 
N. H., Feb. 8, 1794; married Mrs. Anna-Dole Riddle, in 1828, and had 
two children, of whom hereafter ; he died Dec. 26, 1849. 

Martha Riddle 3 (2), second daughter of William 2 (1), was born in 
Bedford, X. H., April 18, 1796 ; married to Dr. P. P. Woodbury, brother 
of Levi Woodbury, ll. d., the distinguished associate justice of the IT. S. 
Supreme Court. Dr. Woodburv's first wife was a sister to Martha; died 
Aug. 19, 1832* 

Dr. Freeman Riddle 3 (1), second son of William 2 (1), was born in Bed- 
ford, X. H., March 13, 1798; graduated at Yale College in 1819; studied 
and practised medicine; settled in Upper Canada, and there died Jan. 
21, 1826. 

Jane Riddle 3 (1), third daughter of William 2 (1), was born in Bed- 
ford, X. H., Sept. 3, 1800 ; married in 1826, to John Goff, and resided at 
Bedford; died Oct. 22, 1875. 

Marinda Riddle 3 (1). fourth daughter of William 2 (1), was born in 
Bedford, X. H., April 6, 1802; and died Oct. 24, 1840, at St, Clair, Mich. 

Benjainin-Frauklin Riddle 3 (1). third son of William 2 (1). was born 
in Bedford, X. H., March 2d, 1804; married, in 1830, Abigail D. Colley, 
and had issue six children, of whom hereafter; residence in 1852, Beloit, 
Wis.; died June 1, 1857. 

* Freeman-Perkins Woodbury, son of Dr. Peter P. Woodbury, of Bedford, and 
Martha Kiddle, engaged in mercantile pursuits in the city of New York when young, 
and has continued there successfully ever since He married Harriet-Ann McGau. 
and has several children, one of whom is a physician. He owns the old Gofl' home- 
stead in the town of Bedford, which he has fitted up for a summer residence. He is 
fond of rural amusements and agriculture. A genial and generous-hearted gentle- 
man of affluence. 



BIDDELLS OF BEDFORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE, NO. 1. 231 

Margaret-Tragallos Riddle 3 (2), youngest daughter of William- (1), 
was born in Bedford, N. H., June 22, 1806; married Reuben Moore, in 
1831, and lived at St. Clair, Mich., in 1852, having issue; no other infor- 
mation. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Asenath Riddle* (1), eldest daughter of Gawn 3 (2), was born in Bed- 
ford, N. H. ; married Thomas G. Holbrook, in 1826, and had issue; died 
in 1845. 

Albert Riddle 4 (1), eldest son of Gawn 3 (2), was born in Bedford, 
N. H., 1804 (?); married Sarah Wheeler, and had seven children; he died 
Aug. 7, 1859. 

Nancy Riddle 4 (2), second daughter of Gawn 3 (2), was born in Bed- 
ford, N. H.; married to William G. Campbell, and died Jan. 31, 1837, 
leaving issue. __ 

Betsey-Dole Riddle 4 (1), eldest daughter of James 3 (1), was born at 
Bedford, jST. H.; married to William Goff, and had issue; resides at 
Kenosha, Wis. 

Sally-Dole Riddle 4 (2), second daughter of James 3 (1), was born in 
Bedford, N. H.; married to William-Riddle French, 1841, and had issue. 



James-McAffee Riddle 4 (3), son of Matthew 3 (1), was born in Ohio, 
Oct. 31, 1820; married Harriet Ogden, and had issue Jive children, of 
whom hereafter; he resided at Matoon, 111.; dead. 

Johll-R. Riddle 4 (4), second son of Matthew 3 (1), was born in Terre 

Haute, Ind., Jan. 19, 1826; married Mary M., daughter of Boothe 

and his wife, Daphne, of Clifton, Ind., May 5, 1849, and had issue four 
daughters, of whom hereafter. Blacksmith by trade; removed to Prairie 
City (now Toledo), 111., in 1853 ; thence to Seelyville, Ind., in 1871 ; thence 
to Cherokee, Kan., in 1877 ; thence to Hutchinson, Kan., in 1880, and 
died at the home of his daughter there, July 4, 1880. His wife pre- 
deceased him May 5, 1865. 

Matthew Riddle 4 (2), youngest son of Matthew 3 (1), was born Oct. 11, 
1828, at Terre Haute, Ind.; left for the far West at the age of twenty- 
one, and with the exception of one or two letters received by his brother 
John soon after his departure, nothing has been heard of him; supposed 
to have "died on the plains." 

Gilman-Eveletll Riddle 4 (4), eldest son of Oilman 3 (1), was born in 
Manchester, N. H., in 1839; married; died, leaving issue. 

John-Henry Riddle 4 (5), second son of Gilman 8 (1), was born in 
Manchester, N. H., in 1842; died in 1845. 

Josephine-Henry Riddle 4 (1), only daughter of Oilman 3 (1), was 
born iu Manchester, in 1845; married S. C. Smith, of Massachusetts, and 
died in 1872, without issue. 

Martha-Ann Riddle 4 (3), eldest daughter of John 3 (3), was born in 
Bedford, N. H., Aug. 20, 1832; unmarried; resides in Manchester. 

Margaret-Elizabeth Riddle 4 (3), second daughter of John 3 (3), was 
born in Bedford, N. H., March 2, 1834; deceased Oct. 16, 1840. 

David-Rraiiuird Riddle 4 (3), eldest son of John 3 (3), was born in 
Bedford, N. H, Feb. 8, 1840; deceased Oct, 3, 1840. 

Mary-Loilisa Riddle 4 (2), third daughter of John 8 (3), was born in 
Bedford, N. H., March 6, 1837 ; unmarried ; lives in Manchester. 



232 BID DELLS OF BEDFORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE, NO. 1. 

Sarah-Jane Riddle 4 (1), fourth daughter of John 3 (3), was born in 
Bedford, N. H., Jan. 7, 1842; died July 13, 1852. 

Charles-Carroll Riddle 4 (1), second son of John 8 (3), was born in 
Bedford, N. H., March 6, 1840; married Sarah Eaton, and has two 
children, of whom hereafter. A farmer. 



Hugh Riddle 4 (3), eldest son of Gawn 8 (3), was born in Bedford, N. 
H., Aug. 11, 1822 ; married Mary S. Walker, May 5, 1852, and by her 
had issue, of whom hereafter. His wife died Jan. 8, 1871, and he married 
secondly, Sept. 4, 1872, Althea E. Wetmore. Early became a civil engi- 
neer, and was employed in the location and construction of the Erie Rail- 
road of New York. Was also identified with the location and construc- 
tion of the Lake Shore and other New York railroads. 

In 1853 Mr. Riddle had charge of track-repairs and construction on the 
Susquehanna Division of the Erie Railway, comprising a distance of one 
hundred and forty miles. His home at this time was at Binghamton, 
Broome County, N. Y. In 1854 he was appointed consulting engineer 
over the entire road and its branches. In 1855 he removed to Port Jer- 
vis, having been appointed superintendent of the Delaware Division, va- 
cating, of course, the offices before mentioned. His labor while superin- 
tending this division was often unremitting and arduous. He was not 
absent during any emergency, day or night. 

Mr. Riddle commenced on the railway as a chain carrier, at one dollar 
a day, and faithfully performed whatever duty was assigned him in the 
various grades of promotion, till he became general superintendent ; and 
has attributed his success more to his perseverance under discouraging 
circumstances when a civil engineer, — even in the wilderness, during the 
construction of the road, — than to any talents he might possess. 

Some incidents in the life of Mr. Riddle illustrate the character of the 
man. Soon after he established himself at Port Jervis, N. Y., he was re- 
turning to his home at a late hour of the evening, and while ascending a 
hill between the Erie depot and the upper village, where he lived, he 
heard approaching footsteps, and in a few moments a man came near and 
tendered him a small parcel. Mr. Riddle then discovered that it was the 
night-watchman of the highway-crossing near his office, and demanded 
of him what the package contained. The man answered, " Some money 
for your little boy." With a frown, and indignation of tone, Mr. Riddle 
replied, " Keep your money; when my child needs it I can supply him. If 
you ever approach me again in this way, I will discharge you the next 
moment." Thus foiled in his attempt to curry favors with the new super- 
intendent, the man gave, as an excuse for his conduct, the statement that 
the former official in that capacity received presents. It was afterwards 
found out that this man wanted to build a shanty on the company's 
grounds. No person who may have presumed to offer a reward as an 
inducement for him to grant a favor ever succeeded with Hugh Riddle ; 
and no person who had spent an hour with him in business intercourse 
would dare to offer him a bribe. His natural independence, supplemented 
by personal training during his early official experience, had prepared him 
to say " no " when occasion required it. 

He never allowed any employe on the road to know that his services 
were considered indispensable. Notwithstanding his high appreciation of 
the abilities of some of his engineers and conductors, as adapted to pecul- 
iarly responsible positions, if they took umbrage and resigned, though 
Mr. Riddle was unwilling to part with them, he would never remonstrate, 



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BIDDELLS OF BEDFORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE, NO. 1. 233 

but let them take their own course ; if they saw their mistake and re- 
turned for employment, however, they would be given a place. 

After ten years of service as superintendent of the Delaware Division 
of the Erie Railway, he resigned his position, and was for some months 
out of business. As the office of general superintendent was vacant at 
this time, at the earnest solicitations of many, Mr. Riddle consented to be 
a candidate for that high and responsible position. This seemed a proper 
opportunity for the employes of the division to show their esteem for 
their late superintendent by procuring for him some suitable gift. A sub- 
scription was consequently started, and reached the large sum of fourteen 
hundred dollars. Two of Mr. Riddle's warmest friends went to New 
York to select the presents. A magnificent gold watch and chain, and a 
beautiful silver tea service, were purchased and engraved, the former with 
Mr. Riddle's initials, and the latter with those of his wife, the whole form- 
ing a testimonial of which any man might feel justly proud. As Mr. Rid- 
dle was known to be as independent as he was unobtrusive, the whole 
transaction had been kept from his knowledge lest he should strangle the 
arrangements by a decided command to stop them. But when the testi- 
monials came and were offered to him, the donors were surprised to hear 
from him a positive refusal to accept them. Knowing it to be a law of 
the Erie Company that no officer shall receive a gift from the employes, 
and aware of his then present disconnection, they said — "Why, Mr. Rid- 
dle, you are not an officer of the company, and no rule adopted by them 
can be violated by your acceptance of the gifts." Mr. Riddle's answer 
was, " I know I am not an officer on this road now, but am I not a candi- 
date for the chief superintendency, and if I am elected, how can I exact 
proper discipline from those who have so generously contributed to pur- 
chase these presents, if I should accept them? I thank the men for their 
kind intentions, but I cannot receive the gifts." The presents were kept 
for months, the donors hoping, in vain, that Mr. Riddle would relent, so 
far, at least, as his wife's present was concerned, but he remained true to 
his first decision. The watch and chain fell into the hands of a locomo- 
tive-engineer on the road when disposed of by a raffle afterwards ; and 
the tea service was returned to New York to be melted over. 

Mr. Riddle was elected general superintendent of the road, and served 
in that capacity with great acceptance several years. He was afterwards 
offered the vice-presidency, under Jay Gould, but declined (having re- 
signed his position of superintendent) any further service on the road. 

Mr. Riddle has been a resident of Chicago for many years, and has 
filled the important offices of general superintendent and vice-president 
of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad. 

Elizabeth Riddle 4 (1), eldest daughter of Gawn 3 (3), was born in Bed- 
ford, N. H., in 1827. Dead. 

Henry-Charles Riddle 4 (1), second son of Gawn 3 (3), was born in 
Bedford, N. H., in 1829; married, and resides in Hawley, Penn. 

Ann-Rebecca Riddle 4 (1), second daughter of Gawn 3 (3), was born 
in Bedford, N. H., in May, 1832; married to Lyman Eastman; resided in 
Manchester ; was a successful school-teacher. Dead. 



Margaret-Aiken Riddle 4 (5), eldest daughter of William 3 (3), was 
born Sept. 9, 1824; died Oct. 5, 1828. * 

Col. George-Washington Riddle 4 (1), eldest son of William 3 (3) 
and Sarah Ferguson, was born in Bedford, N. H., Nov. 9, 1826; married 






234 RIDDELLS OF BEDFORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE, NO. 1. 

Ellen M., daughter of Samuel Brown, of Manchester, X. H., Jan. 19, 
1853, and has one daughter, of whom hereafter. 

Colonel Riddle received his education at the public schools and at the 
academies at Hopkinton and Sanbornton, N. H. For several years he 
dealt extensively in lumber and hops. Possessing a taste for agricultural 
pursuits, he purchased a large farm in his native town, and settled there 
in 1860, where for eight years he carried on farming, and introduced im- 
proved stock and machinery. 

While a resident in Bedford he was elected to preside in every town- 
meeting, with two or three exceptions ; was chairman of selectmen in 1855 
and '56; represented, the town in the Legislature in 1863 and '64; was 
chosen military agent for the town during the Rebellion, and furnished 
one hundred and fifteen men to fill the quota called for by the govern- 
ment. Colonel Riddle so judiciously conducted the enlistment that the 
town, being in part re-imbursed by the State for advanced bounties, found 
itself, at the close of the war, not only free from debt, but with thousands 
of dollars in the treasury. This money was appropriated to build the new 
and beautiful town-hall at Bedford Centre. 

In 1850 Colonel Riddle was appointed and commissioned quartermaster 
of the Ninth Regiment, Xew Hampshire Militia, with rank of lieutenant. 
At the organization of the Amoskeag Veterans, in 1854, he was one of 
the youngest members of that command, and his name still stands enrolled 
as one of the honorary members. 

In 1860 he was commissioned division quartermaster on the staff of 
Major-General McCutchins, with rank of colonel. At the organization of 
the Bedford Light Infantry, in 186*2, — a company composed of the best 
young men in town, many of whom subsequently served in the army, — 
Colonel Riddle was chosen captain, and commanded the company four 
years, during which time, by careful drill and good discipline, it was raised 
to a high state of military efficienev. 

In 1867 he was elected treasurer of the New Hampshire State Agricul- 
tural Society, and during the seventeen years he has served in this ca- 
pacity the fairs have been very successful, promoting the interest of farm- 
ing throughout the State, and the introduction of various improved breeds 
of stock. In 1869, at the solicitation of many of the most prominent men 
in the State, Colonel Riddle was induced to accept the position of treas- 
urer and general manager of the Xew England Agricultural Society. At 
this time the demands of the society required a man of large experience, 
executive ability, and determination, to develop its resources, and to-day, 
under the able management of its treasurer, the society stands second to 
none in Xew England. It has the largest number of life members (two 
thousand), pays liberal premiums, and its fairs are annually visited by 
thousands of patrons. The subject of this notice has held this important 
office fourteen years, and has the reputation of being one of the most suc- 
cessful managers of fairs in the country. 

In consequence of growing business interests, and official engagements 
elsewhere, Colonel Riddle disposed of his farm in Bedford, in 1869, and 
having built an elegant mansion on Myrtle Street, Manchester, fixed his 
residence there He was chosen a commissioner for Hillsboro County in 
1870 ; was re-elected in 1873. and during the six years he served in that 
capacity very important changes were effected at the County Farm, in Wil- 
ton, and at the jail, in the city of Manchester, which was under his im- 
mediate supervision ; and his sympathy and kind treatment toward the 



E1DDELL8 OF BEDFORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE, NO. 1. 235 



unfortunate inmates of these institutions made him very popular, and in- 
sured him the highest commendations, with many a "God bless you and 
yours." He was offered the renomination, but declined the honor. 

In 1876 Colonel Riddle was appointed State Centennial Commissioner, 
to represent the interests of New Hampshire at the great exhibition held 
that year at Philadelphia. He superintended the erection of the New 
Hampshire State building at Fairmount Park, and conducted the exhibit 
of the State during the Centennial. 

After his return from Philadelphia, in 1877, in connection with other 
prominent men of Manchester, he promoted the organization of the Horse 
Railroad Company, and secured subscriptions for stock necessary to make 
the arrangement a success. He was appointed building agent, and in Sep- 
tember of that year the first narrow-gauge street-railway in New England 
was finished, fully equipped, and put into successful operation. This con- 
tinued under Colonel Riddle's management till 1880, when he resigned 
his position. 

For many years Colonel Riddle has been identified with the material 
prosperity of Manchester, and connected with some of the largest and 
most successful financial institutions of the city. He is now director of 
the New Hampshire Fire Insurance Company, trustee of Amoskeag Sav- 
ings Bank, trustee of the People's Bank, director of the Amoskeag Na- 
tional Bank, president of Manchester Driving Park Company, trustee of 
Elliott Hospital, and director of Franklin-street Congregational Society. 
In 1882 he was appointed by Gov. Chas. H. Bell, Fish and Game Commis- 
sioner of New Hampshire, and is now chairman of this important board. 

Until 1883 Manchester had no suitable place for large gatherings, but 
in that year a meeting of the citizens was called, and a stock company 
organized with a large capital to establish fair grounds. Colonel Riddle 
was chosen one of the directors and subsequently president; was author- 
ized to purchase the necessary land, and in the short space of four months 
a half-mile track was built, with commodious fair buildings, the whole 
around being well laid out and transformed into a beautiful park, in which 
the New England Fair of 1884 was held. 

While a resident of Manchester, he was moderator, assessor, and rep- 
resentative to the Legislature (1860). After his return from Bedford he 
was elected and served two years in common council of Manchester. 

As chairman of a military committee during his services in the State 
Legislature, Colonel Riddle, by judicious management, secured an appro- 
priation that enabled Adjt.-Gen. Natt Head to publish an excellent mili- 
tary history of that State. 

Descending from the good Scotch-Irish stock, he is a typical representa- 
tive of that noble race of men who came from the north of Ireland and 
settled this section of New Hampshire: transforming a howling wilder- 
ness into a blooming garden. He is a quiet, peaceful citizen ; has great 
executive force, indomitable courage and perseverance, and achieves re- 
markable success in all his undertakings ; liberal in his views, generous 
to the needy, and a firm friend. Colonel Riddle subscribed for his portrait 
in steel for this book. 

William-Quincy Riddle 4 (5), second son of William 3 (3), was born in 
Bedford, N. IT., June 8, 1828. He has never married. Mr. Riddle is a 
graduate of Harvard and Yale Colleges, and has been engaged in the 
practice of law in New York city for nearly fifteen years. He is regarded 
as an able member of the legal profession, and is employed on cases that 






236 RIDDELLS OF BEDFORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE, NO. 1. 

involve very lai-ge sums of money. He is affable, genial, and conversa- 
tional, and withal a refined and cultivated gentleman. Mr. Riddle at- 
tended the family meeting of the Riddles, held in Philadelphia, in the 
summer of 1876, and took an active part in the business of that meeting. 
He inoved the appointment of the " Co-operative Committee," who have 
rendered important assistance in the furtherance of this book; he was 
one of the general and sub-committees, and has personally devoted 
valuable attention to the interests of the work. The author's acknowl- 
edgments are due this gentleman, for the timely suggestions and sub- 
stantial aid given during his arduous labors in the prosecution of his work, 
— a work which, but for the encouragement of Mr. Riddle, might never 
have been published. 

Dailiel-Wileshire Riddle 4 (1), third son of William 3 (3), was born in 
Bedford, N.H., May 13, 1830; died Sept. 15, 1831, at Piscataquog Village. 

Sarah-Maria Riddle 4 (2), second daughter of William 8 (3), was born 
in Bedford, N. H., May 24, 1832; married John F. Dinckler, and had 
issue; died in 1862. 

Dailiel-Wileshire Riddle 4 (2), fourth son of William 3 (3), was born 
in Bedford, N. H., July 12, 1833; married Jan. 28, 1872, Jennie Howe, of 
Waterloo, N. Y., and has issue. He was engaged in business in Baltimore 
when the war of the Rebellion broke out ; volunteered into the Union 
service, and joined the First Philadelphia Troop, which was stationed at 
Winchester, Va. After his term of service had expired, he received the 
appointment of assistant paymaster in the navy. He was in the blockade 
service of the Gulf and about New Orleans; was on board Admiral Far- 
ragut's flag-ship at the naval battle off Mobile, and practically served 
through the war. After the close of the war, he engaged in business at 
New Orleans, where he continued for a time, and subsequently returned 
to his native town, and is now (1876) living on the homestead place. 

Carroll Riddle 4 (1), youngest son of William 3 (3), was born in Bed- 
ford, N. H., Aug. 2, 1834; married Carrie Martynn, and died without 
issue, in December, 1871. 



Charlotte-Margaret Riddle 4 (1), eldest daughter of James 8 (2), was 
born in Merrimack, N. H., Feb. 20, 1817; married Nathan Parker, cashier 
of Manchester Bank; died in Manchester, Oct. 22, 1859, leaving one son, 
Walter M. Parker. 

Mary-Ann-Lincoln Riddle 4 (2), second daughter of James 8 (2), was 
born in Merrimack, N. H., Aug. 9, 1823; married Gilman Cheney, and 
had issue one son, William-Gilman Cheney; residence Montreal, Can. 

Eliza-Frances Riddle 4 (3), third daughter of James 3 (2), was born 
in Merrimack, N. H., Sept. 4, 1832; married John Jackman, Oct. 11, 1860, 
and had issue one son ; residence, Nashua, N. H. 



Ann-Elizabeth Riddle 4 (2), eldest daughter of Isaac 8 (2), was horn in 
Bedford, N. H., Feb. 18, 1820 ; she was a teacher of the public schools in 
her native town and of the high school in Manchester; died Jan. 26, 1850. 

Isaac-Newton Riddle 4 (3), eldest son of Isaac 3 (2), was born in Bed- 
ford, N. H., Aug. 12, 1822 ; was in mercantile business in early life; after- 
wards appointed to a clerkship in the United States Custom House, in 
Boston, which he retained many years. He is now a Justice of the Peace 
and notary public at Manchester. He resides on the old Riddle home- 
stead in Bedford ;*unmarried. 



RIDDELLS OF BEDFORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE, NO. 1. 237 

Jane-Aiken Riddle 4 (2), second daughter of Isaac 3 (2), was born in 
Bedford, July 6, 1825; was married Oct. 18, 1849, to Benjamin F. White, 
a merchant of Boston, Mass.; died May 10, 1862, leaving one daughter, 
Jennie-Elizabeth White. 

Jollll-Aiken Riddle 4 (5), second son of Isaac 3 (2), was born in Bed- 
ford, N. H., Sept. 8, 1826. He has been engaged in the profession of civil 
engineer in the location and construction of numerous railroads in New 
England and the Middle States ; among them the Boston, Concord & 
Montreal ; Erie ; Atlantic, and Great Western. He visited California in 
1858 for the purpose of inspecting the mines of that State, particularly 
the quartz-mines and the manner of working them. Upon his return 
Mr. Riddle made some researches in the State of Vermont, and extracted 
the first quantity of gold ever taken from the rocks of New England, 
having secured nearly a pound of pure metal from a single ton of ore. 
Mr. Riddle is Justice of the Peace, and a real-estate owner in Man- 
chester; his office in "Riddle's Block." He has rendered much assistance 
in furnishing records for this work, and is a member of the Publishing 
Committee. He lives on the "Riddle Homestead" in Bedford with his 
two brothers, which town he represents in the Legislature of the State; 
never married. 

Silas-Aiken Riddle 4 (1), youngest son of Isaac 3 (2), was born in Bed- 
ford, N. H., July 22, 1831; unmarried. He was engaged in mercantile 
business in Boston and St. Louis, and was in the latter city at the break- 
ing out of the war of the Rebellion. He volunteered into the Union 
navy and was with Admiral Farragut in the Gulf squadron, — was on 
the flag-ship of the gallant Admiral at the naval battle in Mobile Bay. 
He now holds the office of town-clerk, in his native town, and resides 
with his brothers on the homestead. 

Milllliebel Riddle 4 (1), youngest daughter of Isaac 3 (2), died in in- 
fancy. 

Mary-E. Riddle 4 (3), eldest daughter of David 8 (2), was born in 
Merrimack, N. H., April 16, 1827. No other information. 

Gil man Riddle 4 (4), eldest sun of David 3 (2), was born in Merrimack, 
N. H., Oct. 18, 1828 ; died Sept. 11, 1835. 

Charles-Lincoln Riddle 4 (2), second son of David 3 (2), was born in 
Merrimack, N. H., Dec. 7, 1830. He probably went to Hingham after his 
father's death. Cashier of Webster National Bank, Boston, Mass., 1884. 

Adeline Riddle 4 (1), second daughter of David 8 (2), was born in 
Merrimack, N. H., April 11, 1833. 



Laura Riddle 4 (1), only daughter of William 3 (3), was born April 17, 
1831, married to Dr. M. G. J. Tevvksbury, and had issue. She died June 
10, 1871. 

James- W. Riddle 4 (4), only son of William 3 (3), was born March 12, 
1833 ; died Aug. 31, 1849. 



Mary- Woodbury Riddle 4 (5), eldest daughter of Benjamin 3 (1), was 
born at Bedford, N. H., June 9, 1832; lives in New York city. 

Josepk-Colley Riddle 4 (1), eldest son of Benjamin 8 (1), was born in 
Bedford, N. H., March 17, 1834; married in 1864, Annie M. Segar, and 
has issue, of whom hereafter. He is a merchant at Marshalltown, la. 



238 RWDELLS OF BEDFORD, XEW HAMPSHIRE, XO. 1. 

Lieut. William-Franklin Riddle 4 (5), second son of Benjamin 3 (1), 
was born in Bedford, N. EL, July 'J-, 1835. He was in mercantile busi- 
ness in Detroit, Mich., at the breaking out of the war of the Rebellion ; 
entered the Union army and served as first lieutenant in the Twenty-sec- 
ond Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteers. After the war he resumed busi- 
ness at Detroit. 

Abbie-Jane Riddle 4 (1), second daughter of Benjamin 3 (1), was born 
at Amherst, K. H., Aug. 22, 1839; was married Oct. 23, 18G9, to Frank 
Whipple, and resides at Port Huron, Mich. Has children. 

Lieut. Freeman-Benjamin Riddle 4 (2), third son of Benjamin 3 (1), 
was born at Beloit, Wis., Sept. 30, 1841. He served three years in the 
Union army, during the war of the Rebellion, as a private in the Fifth 
Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteers, and was thence commissioned first lieu- 
tenant in the Thirty-seventh Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteers, in which 
service he fell mortally wounded while gallantly leading his troops in 
battle, on the 4th of June, 1864, at Petersburg!), Va. 

Kittie Riddle 4 (1), youngest daughter of Benjamin 3 (1), was born at 
Beloit, Wis., April 8, 1852; w r as living at Port Huron in 1873. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

Sarah-Ellen Riddle 5 (3), eldest daughter of John 4 (4), born in July, 
1852; was married to William Richardson in 1871, at Prairie City, 111., 
where they lived about three years, and where, — after several removals 
to Kansas and elsewhere, — they now reside, near their old homestead. 

Mary-Elizabeth Riddle 5 (6), second daughter of John 4 (4), was born 
at Prairie City, 111., July 19, 1856; was married in 1880 to Jesse Rowe, 
of Cherokee, Kan., and is now living at Monmouth, Kan. 

Alma-Eva Riddle 5 (1), third daughter of John 4 (4), was born at Prai- 
rie City, 111., June, 1858; was married in 1881 to Edmund Richardson 
(brother of William), in Wichita, Kan., but removed to Prairie City with 
her sister Sarah, and now lives there. 

Harriet-Esther Riddle 5 (2), fourth daughter of John 4 (4), was born at 
Prairie City, 111., Feb. 3, 1860 ; was married to V. C. Chamberlain, of Seely- 
ville, Ind. 

Freemau-Gilmore Riddle 5 (3), eldest son of Charles 4 (1), was born 
in Manchester, N. H., July 25, 1866. 



Eddie Riddle 5 (1), eldest son of Hugh 4 (3), was born Dec. 23, 1853 ; 
died Sept. 7, 1854. 

Charles-F. Riddle 5 (3), second son of Hugh 4 (3), was born May 13, 
1855; married at Elmira, N". Y. He became identified with the Erie 
Railroad in early manhood. 

Frederick Riddle 6 (1), third son of Huo;h 4 (3), was born Jan. 29, 
1858 ; died Sept. 30, 1862. 

Mary Riddle 5 (7), a daughter of Hugh 4 (3), was born Jan. 5, 1865; 
died May 12, 1867. " 

Emma Riddle 5 (1), only daughter of George 4 (1), was born in Bed- 
ford, N. H, Feb. 19, 1856; was married April 24, 1884, to Walter C. 
Lewis, of Haverhill, Mass. 



HIDDELLS OF BEDFOBD, NEW HAMPSHIRE, NO. 2. 239 

Blanch-Hay ward Riddle 5 (1), daughter of Daniel 4 (2), was born 
April 9, 1874. 

Freeman-Benjamin Riddle 5 (4), eldest son of Joseph 4 (1), was born 
at Marshalltown, la., in 1866; died in infancy. 

George-Sattler Riddle 5 (3), second son of Joseph 4 (1), was born at 
Marshalltown, la., in September, 1868 ; died in March, 1869. 

Julia-Andrews Riddle 5 (1), eldest daughter of Joseph 4 (1), was born 
at Marshalltown, la., Oct. 20, 1870. 



RIDDELLS OF BEDFORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE, NO. 2. 

[John Bbanch.] 

John Riddell 1 (1), supposed to have been a son of John Riddell and 
his wife, Janet Gordon, of Ballyraeath, Ireland, was born Jan. 2, 1701, — 
an American account places his birth 1709, — and came to New England 
in company with his brothers in 1718, being the youngest of the four. 

He married Janet , settled in Bedford, N. H., alongside of many of 

his Scotch-Irish neighbors from the old country, as a farmer, and had is- 
sue, of whom hereafter. His name was signed to the original petition for 
a charter for the town of Bedford, May 10, 1750. He was fence-viewer 
June 6, 1750; fence-viewer and appraiser in 1751 ; he was a surveyor of 
highways in 1752, and a tax-payer in each of these years. His name is 
not found on the tax-list subsequent to 1752, but the following year, 1753, 
"Janet Riddell" appears as a tax-payer, and continues as such until 1764. 
The information found respecting this man and his family is meagre and 
quite disconnected ; indeed, the descendants of his brothers were not 
aware of such a kinsman. The Rev. Samuel-Hopkins Riddell, an erudite 
and very accurate man, who had gathered considerable genealogical infor- 
mation relating to his family, was taken by surprise when, during my cor- 
respondence with him, I announced the documentary evidence of the ex- 
istence of four original brothers, instead of the traditionary three, of whom 
he was cognizant, and for some time expressed grave doubts as to the au- 
thenticity and accuracy of my proof; at the same time he and others had 
before them the sketch of William P. Riddell, published in 1852, in which 
he mentions this John Riddell as one whose genealogical connections were 
left in obscurity. It has been plausibly assumed that this family was ex- 
tinct in the male line ; but I mention as of interest in the question, the 
existence of a family descended from David Riddell, who was a native of 
New Hampshire, and removed in early life to New York State. (See ac- 
count of this family under designation of " Riddells of Rochdale, New- 
York.") I can find no other New Hampshire branch from which this 
David could have descended. John Riddell died July, 1757, and his slate- 
stone monument in the Bedford cemetery bears the following inscription : 

" To celebrate Jehovah's praise, 
My very body shall arise." 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Mary Riddell 2 (1) was a daughter of John 1 (1), of Bedford. The 
history of that town says of her: "John Riddle had one daughter Mary, 



240 RIDDELLS OF DERRYFIELD, NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

who lived on the Isaac Atwood place, in a house by herself; she was 
never married, and died about 1813." Her name appears on the tax-list 
in 1757 (the year following her father's death), 1758, 1759, and 1782. In 
1783, it was voted to excuse her from paying all past taxes. The church 
records of Bedford bear the names of three Marys of the family-name, 
and one of them was evidently the subject of this notice. Hon. Matthew 
Patten wrote in his diary, April 17, 1778, as follows : " Wrote a deed from 
John Clark to Mary Riddel, and a bond from Mary to him for his mainte- 
nance. 20th, went to Mary Riddel's, and took the acknowledgment of a 
deed from her uncle, John Clark, to her; I had writ the deed and a bond 
from her to him before. She gave me two dollars for my trouble." John 
Clark had married Mary's father's sister in Ireland, and now, — his wife 
having probably died, — he conveys his property to this niece, and she 
gives a bond for his maintenance ; it is probable, then, that John Clark 
died in the house of Mary Riddell. David Patten, in a letter to his brother 
in the latter part of the last century, mentions " John Riddle, the father 
of Mary." 

Elizabeth Riddell 2 (1), presumably a daughter of John 1 (1). Her 
name appears on the tax-list of Bedford from 1757 to 1759. I have no 
record of her marriaoe or death. 



RIDDELLS OF DERRYFIELD, NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

John Riddell 1 (1), came from Scotland (parents unknown) in 1730, 
and settled in Derryfield, 1ST. H. He was born about 1694, and had wife 
"Janet," as appears from her monument now standing in the southwest 
corner of the " Valley Cemetery," Manchester, N. H., it having been re- 
moved from an ancient burying-ground, which is now entirely obliterated by 
the march of improvement. In the "History of Manchester," it is said 
of a burying-place on an oak knoll south of Christian's Brook, and upon 
the farm of John McNeil, which was next to John Riddell' s farm : " The old- 
est monument in date of death and probably in erection, was in memory 
of Mrs. Janet Riddel." The inscription on her monument runs thus : — 

"Here Lyes the Body of 

Mrs. Janet Riddel, Wife to 

Mr. John Riddel. She died 

Septr 18, 1746, Aged 50 years." 

This ancient burying-place, whence the monument was removed, was 
" by the McGregor Bridge, near the present locomotive works." John's 
name appears on the old town records in 1751, as surveyor of highways; 
in 1752 as a committee to procure preaching; in 1753 as selectman and 
committee to supply preaching; in 1754 as fence-viewer, and in 1755-6, 
as a tax-payer. Some say John has a brother Archibald, and the name 
sounds of Scotland, but I can find no records to support the tradition ; if 
there was such a brother he probably settled elsewhere. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

James Riddell 2 (1), a son of John 1 (1), of Derryfield, N. H., was born 
in 1733 ; married Janet, daughter of Mr. John Hall (the first town-clerk), 



RIDDELL 8 OF DERRYFIELD, NEW HAMPSHIRE. 24 1 

Sept. 27, 1759, and died at Springfield, in said State, in 1800, aged 67 
years. He was a private soldier in the old French war, and also served 
under General Sullivan in the war of the Revolution, in a company called 
the "Rogers Rangers," which was sent against the notorious Indians 
known as the " Six Nations." He had issue six children, of whom here- 
after. Mr. Riddell was a large, powerful man. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Elizabeth Riddell 3 (1), eldest daughter of James 2 (1), was born in 
Derryfield, N. H., March 28, 1761. 

John Riddell 3 (2), eldest son of James 2 (1), was born in Derryfield, 
N. H., Feb. 24, 1763 ; married a Miss Thompson, and had issue, of whom 
hereafter. He was a soldier in the war of the Revolution. He enlisted 
for three years, March, 1778, under Capt. Ebenezer Frye, Colonel Cilley's 
New Hampshire regiment, and General Poor's brigade ; was with General 
Sullivan in Genessee, in 1779 and 1780, in the " Ftying Camp " (so called) 
between the American army and the enemy. He was wounded and dis- 
charged near West Point, by Colonel Scammell, in 1781. He resided in 
Tunbridge, Vt., forty-three years. He married, Dec. 12, 1820, Mary 
Church, of Norwich, Vt. She was probably a second wife. He died 
Sept. 24, 1839 ; his widow was living at Tunbridge, in 1850, aged 74. Mr. 
Riddall* (as this branch spell the name) was the father of a numerous fam- 
ily, of whom more hereafter, and his descendants are widely scattered. 

Janet Riddell 3 (1), second daughter of James 2 (1), was born in Der- 
ryfield, N. H., Jan. 12, 1765. 

Sarah Riddell 3 (1), third daughter of James 2 (1), was born in Derry- 
field, N. H., May 17, 1767; was married to Dea. James Wallace, and had 
issue. She was the Sarah who, when a young woman, 'tended a grist- 
mill for Col. Daniel Moore ; he directed her to take no toll from the sack 
of a widow, or from that of a man who brought his grain on his back. 
She said she was " always vexed when two bushels came in one sack." I 
do not find mention of her descendants. 

Mary Riddell 3 (1), fourth daughter of James 2 (1), was born in Derry- 
field, N. H., in 1769; was married, Oct. 16, 1788, to Robert Ford, and 
died July 26, 1848, aged 79 years. During her father's absence in the 
army she lived with her grandfather Hall ; after his return from the war, 
she kept his house in Springfield until his second marriage. She walked 
from Andover, eleven miles through the wilderness, with only " spotted 
trees" for her guide. 

James Riddell 3 (2), youngest son of James 2 (1), was born in Derry- 
field, N. H., in 1771 ; married, Nov. 18, 1790, Sally (or Polly) Carr, and had 
issue nine children, of whom hereafter. He boarded at Deacon Duncan's, 
in Londonderry, during his father's absence in the Revolutionary army, 
and remained there till his settlement in Springfield. Mr. Riddell settled 
on a farm in Grafton, N. H., where he died Sept. 28, 1854, aged 83 years. 

Martha Riddell 3 (1), youngest daughter of James 2 (1), was born in 
1773, and was probably an infant when her mother died. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Levi Riddall 4 (1), eldest son of John 3 (2), was born in Tunbridge, 
Vt., and died somewhere in New York, unmarried. 

*This family use three forms of orthography, viz. : Riddall, Riddell, aud Riddle, 
and I have followed the original authorities. 

16 



24:2 R1DDELLH OF JjERRYFIELD, NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

James Riddall 4 (3), second son of John 3 (2), was born in Tunbridge, 
Vt., and died when a young man, unmarried. 

Lymail Riddall 4 (1), third son of John 3 (2), was born in Tunbridge, 
Vt., married Rhoda Alexander, and resided in Royalton until 1850, when 
he emigrated to Wisconsin. He died a few years ago, leaving several 
children, of whom hereafter. He was a farmer by occupation. 

Ira Riddall 4 (1), fourth son of John 3 (2), was born in Tunbridge, 
Vt. ; married Achsah Mudget, and resided for many years in his native 
town. After the death of his wife he removed to Canaan (?). Now 
dead. 

Hannah Riddall 4 (1), a daughter of John 3 (2), was born in Tun- 
bridge, Vt., and died there, unmarried. 

Sally Riddall 4 (1), a daughter of John 3 (2), was born in Tunbridge, 
Vt. ; was married to Samuel Peterson (or Patterson), and removed to 
the State of New York, where she died. 

Jane Riddall 4 (1), a daughter of John 3 (2), was born in Tunbridge, 
Vt. ; was married to James Adams, and lived and died in her native town. 

Samuel Riddall 4 (1), a son of John 3 (2), was born in Tunbridge, Vt., 
Nov. 14, 1806; married the widow (Dalbar) Cilley, about 1834, and had 
issue four sons, of whom hereafter. He was a farmer in Tunbridge ; 
died July 10, 1862. 

Betsey Riddle 4 (1), eldest daughter of James 3 (2), was born in Graf- 
ton, N. H., Dec. 8, 1791 ; was married Feb. 5, 1818, to Mr. John Upton, 
and died March 23, 1827. 

John Riddle 4 (3), eldest son of James 3 (2), was born in Grafton, N. 
H., June 11, 1794 ; married Oct. 20, 1814, to Polly Robinson, and had is- 
sue, of whom hereafter. He is a farmer, residing in his native town. 

Rachel Riddle 4 (1), second daughter of James 3 (2), was born in Graf- 
ton, N. H., Oct. 6, 1796; was married Dec. 31, 1818, to Merrill Currier, 
and died March 23, 1852. 

Enoch Riddle 4 (1), second son of James 3 (2), was born in Grafton, 
N. H., Feb. 14, 1799 ; married Miss Polly, daughter of Reuben and Abi- 
gail (Follet) Prescott, of Lee, N. H. (she was born March 15, 1800), 
March 4, 1821, and had issue eight children, of whom hereafter. He emi- 
grated to the West some years ago, and died at Peotone, 111., Oct. 11, 
1865. His wife predeceased him March 20, 1856. He was a farmer. 

Beriah Riddle 4 (1), third son of James 3 (2), was born in Grafton, N. 
H., March 29, 1801 ; drowned Aug. 14, 1814. 

Robert Riddle 4 (1), fourth son of James 3 (2), was born in Grafton, 
N. H., Jan. 4, 1802 ; married July 3, 1827, to Sally Davis, and had issue 
three children, of whom hereafter. He was a farmer and currier ; died 
Jan 16, 1835. 

Cyrus Riddle 4 (1), fifth son of James 3 (2), was born in Grafton, N. 
H. (say 1805) ; married a Dutch lady named Sally-Matilda Vanhoosen, and 
had issue four children, of whom hereafter. He was a gardener ; went 
West and died. 

Hiram Riddle 4 (1), sixth son of James 8 (2), was born in Grafton, N. 
H., Nov. 2, 1809; married Jan. 13, 1831, to Betsey-Chase, daughter of 
Richard Whittier (she was born in Grafton, March 10, 1811), and had 
issue five children, of whom hereafter. He emigrated to Minneapolis, 
Minn!, in 1855, where he has been engaged in farming ; died at Water- 
ford, Minn., Feb. 22, 1883, aged 74 years. 



RWt)ELLS OF DERRYFIELD, NEW HAMPSHIRE. !M3 

Polly Riddle 4 (1), youngest daughter of James 3 (2), was born in Graf- 
ton, N. H., Dec. 12, 1811 ; was married to Elkanah Whittier, of Grafton, 
and died at Empire City, Minn., in 1872. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

Ira Riddall 5 (2), a son of Lyman 4 (1), was born in Royalton, Vt. 
James Riddall 5 (4), a son of Lyman 4 (1), was born in Royalton, Vt. 
John Riddall 5 (4), a son of Lyman 4 (1), was born in Royalton, Vt. 



John Riddall 5 (5), eldest son of Samuel 4 (1), was born in Tunbridge, 
Vt., Jan. 29, 1835; married Mary-Ann Lee, April 19, 1862, and died Sept. 
22, 1863. 

Mahew-C. Riddall 5 (1), second son of Samuel 4 (1), was born in Tun- 
bridge, Vt., May 5, 1837; died Sept. 25, 1857; single. 

James-E. Riddall 5 (5), third son of Samuel 4 (1), was born in Tun- 
bridge, Vt., Oct. 28, 1839; married Esther-Ann Shepherd, and resides on 
his father's homestead farm. He was married March 8, 1864. No men- 
tion of children. 

Williaiu-H. Riddall 5 (1), fourth son of Samuel 4 (1), was born in Tun- 
bridge, Vt., Dec. 2, 1841, and lives in Lowell, Mass.; unmarried in 1879. 



James Riddle 5 (6), eldest son of John 4 (3), was born in Grafton, N. H., 
Nov. 16, 1815; married in Quincy, Mass., Jan. 1, 1843, to Mary-Bent Col- 
burn, and has issue (1874) four children, of whom hereafter. He is a 
stone-cutter by trade. Residence unknown. 

Neriall Riddle 5 (1), second son of John 4 (3), was born in Grafton, N. 
H., Dec. 22, 1819; a farmer. No issue. 

Ira Riddle 5 (3), third son of John 4 (3), was born in Grafton, N. H., 
April 8, 1821 ; married March 6, 1844, to Candis Williams, and has issue 
one daughter, of whom hereafter. I do not know his place of residence. 

Alldrew-J. Riddle 5 (1), fourth son of John 4 (3), was born in Grafton, 
N. H., May 8, 1835; married April 28, 1859, to Janetta Martin, and has 
issue two children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddle is a farmer in Grafton. 



Adoiliram Riddle 5 (1), eldest son of Enoch 4 (1), was born in Grafton, 
N. H., July 17, 1822; married July 3, 1850, to Hannah J. Cook, of Centre 
Harbor, N. H., and has issue three children, of whom hereafter. He is a 
machinist and engineer by trade ; now foreman in the Chicago, Burling- 
ton & Quincy Railroad shops, at Aurora, 111. 

Reuben-Prescott Riddle 5 (1), second son of Enoch 4 (1), was born in 
Grafton, N. H., Oct. 14, .1824 ; married, and is now (1879) living in Yuba 
County, Cal. He is a county surveyor ; residence at Mayesville. 

James-Lyman Riddle 5 (7), third son of Enoch 4 (1), was born in Graf- 
ton, N. H., April 10, 1827, and is believed to be living at Marysville, Yuba 
County, Cal. 

Betsey-Arozina Riddle 5 (2), eldest daughter of Enoch 4 (1), was born 
in Grafton, N. H., Feb. 10, 1830; was married to James Webster, Oct. 
5, 1848; he was killed by the cars at Lebanon, N. H., Dec. 18, 1864, aged 
43 years ; secondly, to Cole Vyname (?), with whom she is living near 
Waterman, 111. 

George-W. Riddle 5 (1), fourth son of Enoch 4 (1), was born in Graf- 
ton, N. H., May 29, 1833; married, and resides at Yarmouth, N. S. A 
machinist by trade. 



244 BIDDELLS OF DEBBYFIELD, NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



Robert-B. Riddle 5 (1), fifth son of Enoch 4 (1), was born in Grafton, 
N. H., July 12, 1836; married, and is now (1879) a merchant at Kanka- 
kee, 111. 

Cyi'US-S. Riddle 5 (2), sixth son of Enoch 4 (1), was born in Grafton, 
X. H., July 7, 1839, and died in Illinois, Oct. 11, 1857. 

Charles-B. Riddle 5 (1), seventh son of Enoch 4 (1), was born in Graf- 
ton, N. H., Aug. 3, 1841; married, and is a stockdealer at Peotone, 111. 
Was in the army. 

Oscar-George Riddle 5 (1), only son of Robert 4 (1), was born in Graf- 
ton, N. H., Jan. 19, 1829; died March 24, 1832. 

Elleil-A. Riddle 5 (1), only daughter of Robert 4 (1), was born in Graf- 
ton, N. H., Nov. 20, 1834. A teacher. 



Lettice-Whittier Riddle 5 (1), eldest daughter of Hiram 4 (1), was born 
in Grafton, N. H., June 13, 1831 ; was married Dec. 8, 1852, to L. P. 
Elliott, and died at Farmington, Minn., Sept. 23, 1868, leaving six small 
children. 

Melvilia-Balcll Riddle 5 (1), second daughter of Hiram 4 (1), was born 
in Grafton, N. H., Jan. 6, 1837; was married April 3, 1855, to George S. 
Dickinson. Residence unknown. 

Richard-Whittier Riddle 5 (1), eldest son of Hiram 4 (1), was born in 
Grafton, IS". H., Jan. 23, 1840; married Dec. 4, 1862, to Rachel H. Brooks, 
of Farmington, Minn. He is a house carpenter by trade ; resides in the 
city of Minneapolis, Minn.; has issue three children, of whom hereafter. 

Mary-Estelle Riddle 5 (2), third daughter of Hiram 4 (1), was born in 
Grafton, N. H., Aug. 3, 1844 ; was married Nov. 10, 1861, to William A. 
Smith, and lives in the West. 

James-Albert Riddle 5 (8), second son of Hiram 4 (1), was born in 
Grafton, N. H., Dec. 25, 1848 ; married Oct. 22, 1872, to Hattie I. Cham- 
berlain, and resides at Minneapolis, Minn. ; house carpenter. No men- 
tion of children. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

Oscar-C. Riddle 6 (2), eldest son of James 5 (6), was born in Quincy, 
Mass., Nov. 30, 1850 ; died the same year. 

Sarah-Elizabeth Riddle 6 (2) eldest daughter of James 5 (6), was born 
in Quincy, Mass., July 22, 1852 ; died Nov. 28, 1855. 

Heiiry-W. Riddle 6 (1), second son of James 5 (6), was born in Quin- 
cy, Mass., Dec. 20, 1856. 

Oscar- W. Riddle 6 (3), third son of James 5 (6), was born in Quincy, 
Mass. (presumably), June 22, 1859. 

Sarah-Jane Riddle 6 (3), only daughter of Ira 5 (3), was born Dec. 
13, 1846 ; was married Oct. 6, 1866, to Charles H. Rogers. 



Clara-Emma Riddle 6 (1), eldest daughter of Andrew 5 (1), was born 
Sept. 10, 1862 ; place unknown. 

James-W. Riddle 6 (9), eldest son of Andrew 5 (1), was born Sept. 16, 
1868; place unknown. 

Alice Riddle 6 (1), eldest daughter of Adoniram 5 (1), was born in 
New Hampshire, July 26, 1853, and died Nov. 17, 1853. 



BID DELLS OF COLEBAINE, MASSACHUSETTS, NO. 1. 245 

Clarence-0. Riddle 6 (1), eldest son of Adoniram 5 (1), was born in 
Keene, N. H., Sept. 18, 1854, and is now (1879) a locomotive engineer, 
on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad. 

I)elaZ0ll-A. Riddle 6 (1), second son of Adoniram 5 (1), was born in 
Aurora, 111., March 6, 1858, and is a book-keeper in the office of the super- 
intendent of the locomotive and car department of the Chicago, Burling- 
ton & Quincy Railroads. 

Hiram-Arthur Riddle 6 (2), eldest son of Richard 5 (1), was born at 
Farmington, Minn., Feb. 4, 1864. 

Charles-Richard Riddle 6 (2), second son of Richard 5 (1), was born 
at Sciota, Minn., Feb. 17, 1866. 

Myrta-Betsey Riddle 6 (1), eldest daughter of Richard 5 (1), was born 
at Farmington, *Minn., May 20, 1867. 



RIDDELLS OF COLERAINE, MASSACHUSETTS, NO. 1. 

[Hugh Branch.] 

Dea. Hugh Riddell 1 (1), supposed to be a son of John Riddel! and 
Janet Gordon, of Ballymeath, Ireland, was born Sept. 20, 1692. (See 
"Riddells of Ballymeath, Ireland," in this book.) The subject of this 
notice came to America in the year 1718, in company with his brothers, 
and first sat down at Londonderry, N. H. He married Mrs. Ann Aiken, 
a lady of Scottish descent, of Concord, Mass. He continued his residence 
in Londonderry until 1738, when he removed to Bedford, in the same 
County, where he lived for many years.* He was a pew-owner in Lon- 
donderry meeting-house in 1739, and signed an agreement for a division 
of land there the third day of June the same year. His name appears on 
a petition to the Colonial Assembly of New Hampshire about fishing at 
Amoskeag. In 1750 he resigned a committeeship organized to secure 
preaching there, and signed the resignation in presence of the town 
clerk. In 1752, he was a committee to build a wall around the meet- 
ing-house ; in 1754, a committee to build a frame for a meeting-house; 
in 1756, a committee to give the Rev. John Houston a call to preach; in 
1757, he had forty pounds sterling for underpinning the meeting-house ; 
in 1759, a committee to build a bridge across the Piscataquog River ; and 
in 1762, "Deacon Hugh Riddel" was a committee to get the pulpit built. 
In 1763 he removed to Coleraine, Mass., a place settled by Scotch-Irish 
emigrants, and named for their old home in the north of Ireland. He 
died at Coleraine, Feb. 25, 1775, aged, — according to the record of his 
birth, — eighty-three years. His widow died May 22, 1790 ; they were 
buried in an ancient cemetery in Coleraine, and in 1852 their double head- 
stone stood near the centre of the yard ; his inscription was on one side 
of the stone, and that of the wife on the other. Children, of whom here- 

* He owned the farm since known as the " MacAllister Place," esteemed one of 
the best in town, and situated about one and a half miles north of Bedford Centre. 
The site on which the house of Hugh stood was some forty rods northeast of the 
modern buildings (1852) on this farm, and the location only distinguishable by an 
indention in the ground where the cellar had been. 



246 BIDDELLS OF COLEBATXE, MASSACHUSETTS, NO. 1. 

after, four in number. In 1729 his surname was found spelled "Ridell"; 
on May 10, 1750, it stood on a petition for a charter for Bedford, with 
those of his two brothers, Gawn and John, spelled "Riddell," and in 
1752 it was spelt "Ridel." In Patten's journal the name is always "Rid- 
dell." Patten was a Scotchman, — or of Scottish extraction, — and un- 
derstood the proper spelling of the surname. None of this branch of the 
Riddell family seem to have adopted the surname "Riddle" until subse- 
quent to 1790. 

Hugh Riddell was selectman in Bedford, N. H., in the years 1754 and 
1755. The following is a facsimile of his autograph : — 



7Cyk42ft&< 



SECOND GENERATION. 

Dea. Hugh Riddell" (2), eldest son of Hugh 1 (1) and Ann Aiken, was 
born in Bedford, N. H., in August, 1740. He married Jane Morris, and 
in the year 1763 removed to Coleraine, Mass., where he settled on a farm, 
and remained until within fifteen years of his death, when he went to live 
with his son Samuel, in Charlemont in the same State. He died June 5, 
1817, aged 77 years. He was a sturdy man, and a sound orthodox dea- 
con of the celebrated priest Taggart's church. His physical strength was 
remarkable, and it is said that the parson and his deacon, after refreshing 
the inner man, would frequently try each other's muscle in friendly wres- 
tle, till they would pant like two bullocks; in these encounters they han- 
dled each other roughly, but always in the best spirit. Mr. Riddell had 
few equals in his day, where physical power was demanded. The town 
of Coleraine, where he lived, like that in the north of Ireland for which 
it was named, was noted for its large men. Dr. Adam Clark, the distin- 
guished commentator, writes that he had seen many men in Coleraine, 
Ireland, whose height was seven and a half feet, and some whose stature 
was eight feet. Mr. Riddell's wife, by whom he had issue nine children, 
is supposed to have died at the home of her son Samuel, in Charlemont, 
but I have no record. See account of descendants further on. 

William Riddell 2 (1), second son of Hugh 1 (1) and Ann Aiken, was 
born in Bedford, N. H., in the year 1742, and was lost at sea before the 
removal of the family from Bedford to Coleraine, Mass.; unmarried. 

Robert Riddell' (1), third son of Hugh 1 (1) and Ann Aiken, was 
born in Bedford, N. H., May 11, 1744; married Jane McGee, — she was 
born in Deerfield, Mass., Oct. 23, 1747, — and removed from Coleraine to 
Ripley, Chautauqua County, N. Y., where he died Feb. 20, 1822, aged 78 
years; his wife predeceased him, at Otsego, jST. Y., April 5, 1805. They 
had issue ten children, of whom hereafter. 

Ann Riddell 2 (1), only daughter of Hugh 1 (1), was born in Bedford, 
N. H., in 1747 ; married to Jonathan Wilson, and had issue. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Letitia Riddell 8 (1), eldest daughter of Hugh 2 (2), was born in Cole- 
raine, Mass., and died when ten months old. 

Rev. William Riddel 3 (1), eldest son of Hugh- (2), was horn in Cole- 
raine, Mass., Feb. 4, 1768 ; married, Sept. 4, 1797, Lucy, daughter of Rev. 



JRIDDELLS OF COLEEAINE, MASSACHUSETTS, NO. 1. 247 

Samuel Hopkins, d. d., of Hadley, Mass. She was half-sister of the wife 
of Doctor Emmons, and own sister of the two wives of Dr. Samuel 
Spring, of Newburyport, Mass., and of Dr. Samuel Austin, of Worcester, 
Mass. (afterwards president of Vermont University, at Burlington), and 
also sister of the wife of Rev. Leonard Worcester, of Peacham, Vt. Mr. 
Riddel labored on the farm with his father until within one year of his 
majority, when, being desirous of obtaining a college-education, he pro- 
posed to his father that if he would grant him the remainder of his time, 
he would relinquish all claims to his share of the parental patrimony in 
favor of his younger brothers, and seek to acquire an education by his 
own exertions. This proposal was accepted by his father, and the son 
thereafter supported himself principally by teaching school. 

When he entered Dartmouth College his mother gave him an outfit 
of bedding, and his father made him a present of the colt on which he 
rode to Hanover, and which he sold for his own benefit. This was all the 
aid his parents were able to give him to assist in his education. He 
showed remarkable application in his studies while at college, and grad- 
uated in 1793, with high honors in his class. He afterwards studied divin- 
ity with Doctor Burton, of Thetford, Vt., and with Doctor Emmons, at 
Franklin, Mass. His first pastorate was at Bristol, Me., commencing in 
1796; second settlement in Townsend, Vt., in 1806; third pastorate in 
Whittingham, Vt., in 1818. He was a man of thorough scholarship, 
strong, logical mind, retentive memory, a sound Calvinist, an able sermon- 
izer, serious and earnest, but not eloquent, in his style of delivery. His 
reading was extensive, and his mind, in riper years, was a store-house of 
knowledge. His nephew says, " I remember Uncle William very well in 
the last years of his life, when he rode the old, long, lank sorrel up and 
down, with immense saddle-bags under him, from which he would pull 
and scatter tracts as he passed taverns and naughty boys. He was ava- 
ricious, and saved large sums of money ; but he was a true, honest man, a 
good old uncle, and at the last gave considerable money to the Tract So- 
ciety. For my part he sent me a large number of the New England Cate- 
chisms to distribute, but I found them very unpopular in the West." 

His wife died in 1813, from which time until his death, — a pei'iod of 
twenty-six years, — he remained a widower, keeping his family together until 
his children were educated and settled in life. He died in South Deerfield, 
Mass., Oct. 24, 1849, in the eighty-second year of his age. Mr. Riddel 
adopted an orthography unlike any other of the family, in consequence of 
reading the name in the poems of Robert Burns, where the name of Cap- 
tain Riddell, a great favorite of the poet, was spelt with only one I. Mr. 
Riddel supposed this to be the most pix>per form ; but the mistake was 
made by the publishers of Burns, for the Riddells of Glen-Riddell, repre- 
sented by the patron of the poet, were a branch of the " Riddells of Rid- 
dell," in Roxbm-ghshire, and they universally spelt the name with the 
double letters. Mr. Riddel had issue seven children, of whom hereafter. 

Samuel Riddell 3 (1), second son of Hugh 2 (2), was born in Cole- 
raine, Mass., June 13, 1769; married Jane Donaldson, in 1794, and had is- 
sue nine children, of whom hereafter. He purchased a farm, and moved 
from Coleraine to Charlemont, Mass., in 1796 ; spent thirty years on "this 
poor side-hill farm," and in 1835, when his family were all gone but 
Thomas, he left the old neighborhood, and the graves of his father, 
mother, and children, and went to Ann Arbor, Mich., where he spent one 
year, and removed to Milwaukee, Wis., where he had a son and daughter. 



248 BIDDELLS OF COLERAINE, MASSACHUSETTS, NO. 1. 

In 1838 he settled on a farm at Wauwatosa, six miles from the city, where 
he spent a happy evening of life, retaining all his faculties till his 
death, which occurred Aug. 8, 1851, aged 82 years. His son says, "My 
father was full six feet tall, and sometimes weighed two hundred pounds. 
His head was well poised; he was a man of great energy, of quick appre- 
hension, and regarded as one of the first men in his town. He possessed 
a military taste, and was sometimes called 'General Jackson' ; he was gen- 
erous to a fault, and lost much as a bondsman for others. With apparent 
sternness was mingled the gentleness of a child. He was quick and sharp 
at repartee." In a communication written by the same son previously, he 
says, " My father was a man of the old stamp ; his frame was muscular, 
and his mental faculties good ; his memory was so tenacious that down to 
his death he could inform us accurately in regard to the different connec- 
tions and branches of our family." 

Jane Riddell 3 (1), second daughter of Hugh 2 (2), was born in Cole- 
raine, Mass., in 1771, and died in her seventh year. 

Hugh Riddell 3 (3), third son of Hugh 2 (2), was born in Coleraine, 
Mass., in 1774; died in his fourth year. 

Jane Riddell 3 (2), third daughter of Hugh 2 (2). was born in Coleraine, 
Mass., in 1779; died an infant. 

Jane Riddell 3 (3), fourth daughter of Hugh 2 (2), was born in Cole- 
raine, Mass., in 1779; died in infancy. 

Thomas-Morris Riddell 3 (1), fourth son of Hugh 2 (2), was born in 
Coleraine, Mass., July 15, 1782; inherited the homestead, and reared a 
large family. His wife's name has not reached me. He was well edu- 
cated, read extensively, was fond of poetry and music, a good singer, and 
strong controversialist. He lost his property, and in 1810 moved to 
Charlemont, Mass., thence to Rowe, where his family worked in the mills, 
and where he and his wife died. 

Elisha Riddell 3 (1), fifth son of Hugh 2 (2), was born in Coleraine, 
Mass., in 1785; never married. He was a soldier in the war of 1812; a 
bright, active man, of somewhat irregular habits. He was in the battle 
of Plattsburgh, after which he lost his fingers and toes by frost; twelve 
years subsequently he returned home and remained one year; he then 
went awav and was never afterwards heard from. 



Mary Riddell 3 (1), eldest daughter of Robert 2 (1), was born in Cole- 
raine, Mass., Oct. 8, 1769; time of death unknown. 

Thomas Riddell 3 (2), eldest son of Robert 2 (1), was born in Coleraine, 
Mass., Sept. 19, 1771; died in New York State, Nov. 8, 1832. No other 
information. 

James Riddell 3 (1), third son of Robert 2 (1), was born in Coleraine, 
Mass., Dec. 8, 1776, and died Aug. 20, 1777. 

Ann Riddell 3 (2), second daughter of Robert 2 (1), was born in Cole- 
raine, Mass., Sept. 26, 1779; died Aug. 5, 1789. 

Betsey Riddell 3 (1), third daughter of Robert 2 (1), was born in Cole- 
raine, Mass., June 12, 1781; married to Eleazer Hill (who died Sept. 5, 
1845), and died Nov. 5, 1857, leaving issue. 

William-M. Riddell 3 (2), fotfrth son of Robert 2 (1), was born in 
Otsego County, N. Y., June 20, 1783; married Jennie Stetson, of Cherry 
Valley, June 7, 1804 (she was born April 17, 1783), and by her had issue 
eight children, of whom hereafter. He was a farmer in Westfield, N. Y., 
and died Oct. 1, 1821 ; his widow died June 16, 1839. 



RIDDELLS OF COLERAINE, MASSACHUSETTS, NO. 1. 249 

Robert Riddell 3 (2), fifth son of Robert 2 (1), was born June 5, 1786; 
married Olive Tucker, May 1, 1823, and had by that lady ten children, of 
whom hereafter ; he died Feb. 21, 1864. 

Jane Riddell 3 (4), fourth daughter of Robert 2 (1), was born June 5, 1789. 

Anne Riddell 3 (3), fifth daughter of Robert 2 (l),was born Feb. 8, 1793. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Llicy Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of William 3 (1), was born July 17, 
1798; died Oct. 31, 1798. 

Rev. Samuel-Hopkins Riddel 4 (2), eldest son of William 3 (1), was 
born in Bristol, Me., Jan. 2, 1800; married July 12, 1827, Harriet-Angeline 
Ray, of North Haven, Conn., and had issue two children. His first wife 
was born May 31, 1808, and died March 15, 1856. Mr. Riddel graduated 
at Yale College in 1823; at Andover Theological Seminary in 1826, and 
was ordained at Glastonbury, Conn., June 27, 1827. He was dismissed 
from his first pastorate to accept the appointment of the American Edu- 
cational Society, as secretary and general agent of the Connecticut branch 
of the society, to reside at Hartford ; during the period of his residence 
there, the Congregationalism a weekly religious newspaper, — the first in the 
world that bore the name, — was started by an association of gentlemen, 
and placed in his hands as editor. In May, 1841, he removed to Boston, 
to become the secretary of the American Educational Society, in which 
office he continued till May, 1850 ; having charge of the American Quar- 
terly Register, published by the society until that periodical was discon- 
tinued, in 1843. After leaving the Educational Society, he became asso- 
ciate editor and part proprietor of the Puritan Recorder, a weekly religious 
newspaper in Boston, for five years. The Congregationalist, of Hartford, 
upon Mr. Riddel's leaving the editorship, had been merged in the Puritan 
Recorder, losing its distinctive name; and in the meantime this name was 
assumed by a new independent journal, started in Boston, which at length 
bought up the Recorder, and has become a first-class denominational paper. 
After severing his connection with the Recorder he was installed pastor of 
the Congregational Church in Tamworth, N. H., where for twelve years 
he labored in the ministry, until August, 1872, when he relinquished his 
charge. He continued his residence in Tamworth some time after closing 
his pastoral relations with the church there. He had married, secondly, 
Oct. 7, 1862, Mrs. C. D. (Douglass) Evans, of North Conway. She was born 
in Portland, Me., April 11, 1810; died in Conway, N. H, Jan. 28, 1866. 
In 1875, he went West with the intention of visiting relatives, but was pre- 
vailed upon to pass the winter with a family at Des Moines, who had for- 
merly been in his parish in Tamworth. But when the spring came he took 
cold, which developed into pneumonia, of which he died June 1, 1876. 

The old ministers knew Mr. Riddel well, and those who were early 
associated with him valued him for those qualities which made him a 
faithful and successful editor and secretary ; for his accuracy, thorough- 
ness, and order; for his keen interest in whatever was worth doing; for 
a nicety of perception, taste, and sagacity, which were peculiarly prom- 
inent characteristics of the man. He had all the marks of scholarship 
which impress those of educational and scholarly tnste. Mr. Riddel was 
a clear thinker and a strong, logical writer; he had never published books, 
but his able articles, published in some of the leading papers and maga- 
zines, always commanded attention, as the products of a master-mind. 
He was a man of strong tendencies, — strong in affection and unfaltering 



250 RIDDELLS OF COLEEAINE, MASSACHUSETTS, NO. 1. 

in his attentions and devotion to objects of his esteem. The interests 
of an invalid daughter were a motive for his retirement to the quiet 
country parish at Tamworth; here he tenderly watched over his child for 
twelve years, during which he hardly left her for a day; he read to her, 
lifted her, brought news from the outside world to her, watched her 
as she sometimes passed suddenly into a world of terrible visions, 
and with all this grew dull of hearing, so that he could hardly hear her 
weak voice. Through all these years he lived thus without a murmur, 
grateful for every little kindness, thoughtful for every one, steadfast in 
his faith, unwavering in fulfilling all the duties of life. He grew pre- 
maturely old under his cares, but never lost his cheerfulness. The only 
shadows of despondency passed over him when he had laid this daughter 
in the grave and resigned his charge. In a letter to the author of this 
work, — a work in which he took a deep interest, — he wrote, ' ; My coal 
is quenched." 

As a sermonizer Mr. Riddel was not eloquent ; his sermons were pre- 
pared with much study and care; were very practical, pointed, and clear, 
delivered in a calm, social manner. His reading was extensive, and the 
fund of information which he had acquired was almost unlimited. Social, 
conversational, cautious, and with commanding gravity, he entertained 
his friends. He was tall and spare, shaved clean, was quite bald, wore 
glasses, and carried a calm yet pleasant expression of face. I believe all 
who knew him rate him with the best of men. He was buried in Mt. 
Auburn Cemetery; and the few friends who gathered at the chapel there, 
drawn by love for the departed, were possessed with a feeling of thank- 
fulness, that one who had endured so much was himself at rest. 

William Riddell 4 (3), second son of William 3 (1), was born in Bristol, 
Me., April 15, 1801; died April 24, 1801. 

Jane Kiddell 4 (5), second daughter of William 3 (l), was born June 20, 
1802 ; married William Hadley, of Putnam, O., March 19, 1833. He was 
born in Francestown, N. H., Aug. 7, 1793. They resided for a time at 
Malta, Morgan County, and in Straitsville, Perry County, O., where she 
died Aug. 30, 1862; he died March 9, 1863. They had six children. 

William Riddell 4 (4), third son of William 3 (1), was born Aug. 28, 
1803; died June 16, 1804. 

Selina Riddell 4 (1), third daughter of William 3 (1), was born June 
19, 1807 ; married, Nov. 8, 1832, to Caleb-Allen Coolev, of South Deer- 
field, Mass. He was born March 28, 1800, and died Sept. 20, 1845; she 
died March 2, 1837, leaving tioo children. 

Septima Riddell 4 (1), fourth daughter of William 3 (1), was born Oct. 
29, 1810; died Nov. 4, 1810. 



James-Aiken Riddell 4 (2), eldest son of Samuel 3 (1), born July 9, 
1795; married Lydia Cooper in 1823; settled in Sullivan, Wis , and had 
issue jive children, of whom hereafter. 

William Riddell 4 (5), second son of Samuel 3 (1), was born April 14, 
1798; married first, in 1830, to Phebe Thayer, and secondly, June, 1843, 
to Sally Artherton. His first wife died in August, 1834. He resided at 
Charlemont, Mass., in 1852, and had a family of children. 

Fanny-Clark Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of Samuel 3 (1), was born 
July 17, 1800; married in July, 1825, to Isaac Allis. Her first husband 
died, and she married, secondly, Oct. 25, 1841, to David Morgan; resi- 
dence, Wauwatosa, Milwaukee County, Wis. 



BIDDELLS OF COLERAINE, MASSACHUSETTS, NO. 1. 251 

Jane Riddell 4 (6), second daughter of Samuel 3 (1), was born Sept. 29, 
1802; died Aug. 29, 1805. 

Antis-Ross Riddell 4 (1), third daughter of Samuel 3 (1), was born 
March 19, 1805; married in July, 1827, to Ahaz Williams, and died at 
Ann Arbor, Mich., June 30, 1836. 

Park Riddell 4 (1), fourth son of Samuel 3 (1), was born May 9, 1807; 
died in March, 1809. 

Cordelia Riddell 4 (1), fifth daughter of Samuel 3 (1), was born Aug. 
22, 1809; married in November, 1832, to Daniel Brown. 

Samuel Riddell 4 (3), fourth son of Samuel 3 (1), was born March 2, 
1812; married Jan. 1, 1836, Clarissa C. Perry. His first wife, Sarah H. 
Hall, died at Ann Arbor, Mich., 1835. 

Thomas-Morris Riddell 4 (3), fifth son of Samuel 3 (1), was born 
April 22, 1816 ; married June 25, 1840, Adaline A. Hill, in Charlemont, 
Mass. ; emigrated to Wauwatosa, Wis., Nov. 2, 1835, and settled as a 
farmer. He has been station-agent for the Milwaukee & St. Paul Rail- 
road, postmastei", notary public, and filled many offices in his town. He 
was a Methodist class-leader, and his house a home for ministers. He 
died in Wauwatosa, Sept. 2, 1869, aged 53 years. He had five children, 
of whom hereafter. 



Lovilia-C. Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of William 3 (2), was born 
Dec. 31, 1806 ; died May 5, 1809. 

Luciilda-J. Riddell 4 (1), second daughter of William 3 (2), was born 
Jan. 29, 1809; died Aug. 22, 1833. 

Eliza-Ann Riddell 4 (1), third daughter of William 3 (2), was born 
Oct. 22, 1811; married to Maurice Dick, of Westfield, N. Y., and died 
March 20, 1852. 

Josepll-McGee Riddell 4 (1), eldest son of William 3 (2), was born 
Nov. 9, 1813; married Isabella McWharter, 1841; had issue, of whom 
hereafter, and died Feb. 16, 1864. 

Mary-Jane Riddell 4 (2), second son of William 3 (2), was born Feb. 
17, 1816 ; married Jan. 7, 1836, to Oliver Minigar ; resides in Ripley, N. Y. 

William-Oliver Riddell 4 (6), second son of William 3 (2), was born 
Dec. 8, 1818 ; married Sept. 8, 1844, to Caroline Wilcox ; she died in 
1860, and he married secondly, Oct. 12, 1863, Almira J. Bassett. Mr. 
Riddell resides at Cherry Valley, 111., and is a farmer; he has a family of 
several children, of whom hereafter. 

Jannetta Riddell 4 (1), fifth daughter of William 3 (2), was born Dec. 
1, 1822; married Sept. 14, 1841, to Milo McWharter, a lawyer, and lives 
at New Lisbon, Wis. 

Hugh-Bolton Riddell 4 (4), third son of William 3 (2), was born May 
7, 1826; died Aug. 10, 1831. 

George Riddell 4 (1), eldest son of Robert 3 (2). 
Harriet Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of Robert 3 (2). 
Eliza Riddell 4 (2), second daughter of Robert 3 (2). 
Jane Riddell 4 (7), third daughter of Robert 3 (2). 
Nancy Riddell 4 (1), fourth daughter of Robert 3 (2). 
Samuel Riddell 4 (4), second son of Robert 3 (2). 
Charles Riddell 4 (1), third son of Robert 3 (2). 
Delos Riddell 4 (1), fourth son of Robert 3 (2). 
Mary Riddell 4 (3), fifth daughter of Robert 3 (2). 
Franklin Riddell 4 (J), fifth son of Robert 3 (2). 



All 
born 

in 

New 

York. 



252 BIDDE'LLS OF COLERAIXE, MASSACHUSETTS, XO. 1. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

Harriet-Fitch Riddel 5 (2), eldest daughter of Samuel 4 (2), was born 
in Boston, Mass., Sept. '28, 1828; died Jan. 6, 1851 ; unmarried. 

Lucy-HopkillS Riddell 5 (2), second daughter of Samuel 4 (2), was 
born in Boston, Mass., July 31, 1830 ; died May 18, 1873, aged 43 years. 
She was for many years afflicted with a nervous affection, and gradually 
withdrew into a single room in the parsonage, excluded the light, closed 
her sensitive eyes with a bandage, and lay thus year after year. She 
suffered intensely in body and mind ; her delicate yet tenacious organ- 
ization was the counterpart of a singularly gifted mind. Her solitude 
was broken by letters from a few friends, which were piece by piece 
conveyed to her by her father, who read to her a few moments each day, 
when "she could bear it. Now and then some friend would call, and be 
led groping into the dark chamber, to hold her hand and tell a few 
tidings, and hear a few words from her thin lips in a fine, attenuated 
voice ; her own communications were in pencilled notes, and oftentimes 
palimpsests, to the unaccustomed reader, and in short flights of song or 
meditation, often of great beauty. Sometimes she would take her pen- 
cil and paper to write to a friend, painfully record a few sentences, then 
lay her materials aside, and be able only after months to resume them 
again ; she could then take up the same train of thought which had been 
held by her wonderful memory. Some of the sentences she composed 
seemed the product of an inspired and divinely-gifted mind, so sweet and 
beautiful were they. To say that she was a strangely spiritual and won- 
derfully gifted woman is no fitting tribute to her character and talents. 

William-Park Riddell 5 (7), eldest son of James 4 (2), was born June 
20, 1824; resided at Sullivan, Wis. 

Jane-Maria Riddell 5 (8), eldest daughter of James 4 (2), was born 
April 2, 1827; married Elias W. Combs, in October, 1848. Mr. Combs 
died Jan. 4, 1850, leaving issue. 

Mary-Eliza Riddell 5 (4), second daughter of James 4 (2), was born 
Nov. 20, 1831 ; married to Ivory Longby, in 1850, and had issue. 

Sybil-Marian Riddell 5 (1), third daughter of James 4 (2), was born 
June 29, 1834. 

Antis-Cordelia Riddell 5 (2), fourth .laughter of James 4 (2), was 
born Nov. 24, 1836. 

John-Wesley Riddell 5 (1), eldest son of William 4 (5), was born in 
Charlemont, Mass., August, 1834; married, and has issue, of whom here- 
after. He resides at Greenfield, Mass. 

Ellen-Maria Riddell 5 (1), eldest daughter of Thomas 4 (3), was born 
at Wauwatosa, Wis., Nov. 22, 1841; married Nov. 22, 1864, to Rev. 
Thomas C. Wilson, and has issue. Mr. Wilson is a Methodist presiding 
elder of Appleton (Wis.) District, and member of the Wisconsin Con- 
ference. He graduated at Lawrence University : residence, Waupaca, 
Wis. 

Thomas-Morris Riddell 5 (4), eldest son of Thomas 4 (3), was born at 
Wauwatosa, Wis., Nov. 30, 1845; married Dec. 17, 1873, to Sophia A. 
Eldret, and lives at Charles City, la. 

Charles-Hill Riddell 5 (2), second son of Thomas 4 (3), was bom at 
Wauwatosa, Wis., Aug. 9, 1852 ; unmarried. , 



RIDDELLS OF COLERAIXE, MASSACHUSETTS, NO. 2. 253 

Edwiu-Augnstus Riddell 5 (1), third son of Thomas 4 (3), was born at 
Wauwatosa, Wis., April 11, 1857; unmarried. 

Francis-Imogen Riddell 5 (1), fourth son of Thomas 4 (3), was born 
at Wauwatosa, Wis., July 22, 1859; unmarried. 



Sarah-Josephine Riddell 5 (1), eldest daughter of William 4 (6), was 
born at Cherry Valley, 111., Sept. 12, 1846, and married Feb. 5, 1866, to 
Ashley Alexander. 

Eugene Riddell 5 (1), eldest son of William 4 (6), was born at Cherry 
Valley, 111., Sept. 4, 1847; married Sept. 16, 1870, Nellie Maurice. 

Frank Riddell 5 (2), second son of William 4 (6), Avas born at Cherry 
Valley, III, Feb. 22, 1849. 

Mary-A. Riddell 5 (6), second daughter of William 4 (6), was born at 
Cherry Valley, 111., June 3, 1854; died March 7, 1856. 

William-0. Riddell 5 (8), third son of William 4 (G), was born at 
Cherry Valley, 111., Oct. 12, 1867. 



RIDDELLS OF COLERAINE, MASSACHUSETTS, NO. 2. 

[Robert Branch.] 

Robert Riddell 1 (1), presumed to be a son of John Riddell and Janet 
Gordon, of Ballymeath, Ireland, was born March 14, 1698, and came with 
his three brothers to America in 1718. He married Mary Thompson, a 
lady of Scottish extraction (she was born in 1706, and died May 27, 1759), 
and had issue, of whom hereafter. He settled in Londonderry, N. H., 
alongside of many Scotch-Irish families. He was surveyor of highways 
in Londonderry in 1748, 1749; and in 1753 was "haward." His name 
does not appear on the tax-list or town records of Bedford, and he prob- 
ably never lived there. He removed to Coleraine (now Franklin County), 
Mass., and joined a Scotch-Irish settlement there ; bought a large tract of 
land and built a spacious house, that was for many years used as a tavern 
for the accommodation of the traveling public. Mr. Riddell was a man 
of gigantic proportions, and of symmetrical form ; a man of formidable 
strength, but of mild disposition. His eyes were blue, and his complexion 
fair. There are many traditions preserved in the family, among his de- 
scendants, respecting his great feats of strength, one of which was the 
shouldering of a cannon on muster-day, which was considered a Hercu- 
lean feat. He was notorious as a bold Indian-fighter. Many of his de- 
scendants are very large men. He died at Coleraine, Sept. 14, 1787, aged 
(according to date on grave-stone) 79 years; if born in 1698 (as per rec- 
cords from Ireland), he was 89 years old at his death. His tombstone 
stands near the northern extremity of the old burying-ground at Cole- 
raine, nearly concealed with rank briars, and bears the following inscrip- 
tion : — 

" All you advanced in years, 
You healthy and robust, 
Are tott'ring round the grave, 
And soon must turn to dust." 



254 BIDDJELLS OF COLEJi'A/.\h\ MASSACHUSETTS, XO. 2. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Gavin Riddell 2 (1), eldest son of Robert 1 (1), was born in London- 
derry, N. EL, Feb. 22, 1753; married Margaret Taggart, in 1782, and had 
issue eleven children, of whom hereafter. He removed from Londonderry 
to Coleraine, Mass., with his parents, and kept a public-house there. He 
was a soldier of the Revolution, and many traditions are preserved among 
his descendants concerning his prowess in his frequent skirmishes with 
the Indians, who grievously infested those regions at that early time. He 
died July 29, 1812. 

Robert Riddell" (2), second son of Robert 1 (1), was born in London- 
derry, N. H., Jan. 27, 1758; married Jemima Long, in 1784, and removed 
to Sullivan Countv, N. Y. Mrs. Riddell was from Shelburne, Mass., born 
Feb. 20, 1760, and' died in New York, Sept. 18, 1822. They had issue 
eight children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddell died Aug. 11, 1808, aged 
50 years. 

Susannah Riddell' 2 (1), only daughter of Robert 1 (1), was born in 

Londonderry, N. H., in 1759; married Edwards, and had children, 

all of whom are deceased. She died previous to 1852. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Capt. John Riddell 3 (1), eldest son of Gavin' 2 (1), was born in Cole- 
raine, Mass., Dec. 15, 1783; married Lephe Gates,* in 1806, and had issue 
ten children, of whom hereafter. He was educated at Deerfield Academy. 
In 1805, he taught school at Norwich, now Preston, Chenango County, 
N. Y. In 1807, with his family, consisting of his wife and one son, he re- 
moved to a farm about one mile west of Preston Corners, where he built 
a home and permanently settled. The house stood about eighty rods 
northwest of the house occupied by his son Samuel T., in 1852. During 
the winter of 1815-16, Mr. Riddell taught school in his own district. He 
held the office of constable and Justice of the Peace, receiving his com- 
mission from the Governor of the State. Subsequently he was frequently 
elected to the office of supervisor, and ever enjoyed the entire confidence 
of his townsmen. He was chosen captain of the militia, at that time an 
office of considerable respectability, and his commission from Governor 
Tompkins is still (1852) preserved among the family papers. Captain 
Riddell was tall and rather slim ; he had light blue eyes and dark hair ; 
was noted for his large stock of general information, being an extensive 
reader all his days. As a leading, public-spirited man, he was highly es- 
teemed, and was long a reliable and very useful public servant. He died 
May 10, 1833, deservedly lamented by all who knew him. 

Susanna Riddell 3 (2), eldest daughter of Gavin 2 (1), was born in Cole- 

* Lephe Gates, the mother of the above-mentioned family, was a daughter of 
Peter Gates, who married Mary Allen, both from Groton, Mass. ( ?), — then of Ley den, 
Mass. Lephe was born Nov. 22, 1787. "Under circumstances (says her son 
William) peculiarly embarrassing, after the death of her husband, she proved 
herself a woman of peculiar energy of character, and her efforts in behalf of the 
family, at that time composed chiefly of young children, are not likely soon to be 
forgotten by them. During the time of her greatest perplexity, after her husband's 
death, she seemed to receive great consolation from reading the Bible, and actually 
read the whole through in five months." She used to tell, with apparent satisfac- 
tion, of spinning one hundred and thirty-nine knots of yarn in a day, in early life, 
besides attending to the household duties; this was done in 1826. She was enjoy- 
ing good health in 1852, and had the care of two of her grandsons from New 
Orleans, educating at the North. 



RIDDELLS OF COLERAINE, MASSACHUSETTS, NO. 2. 255 

raine, Mass., in 1787; married to Nathan Noyes, of Preston, N. Y., and 
had issue. In 1822, the family removed to Perrington, N. Y., and in 
April, 1833, to Novi, thence to Plymouth, Mich. Her sons were judges, 
lawyers, and doctors, — all distinguished. Mrs. Noyes died at Marshall, 
Mich., in 1850. 

Robert Ritldell 3 (3), second son of Gavin 2 (1), was born in Coleraine, 
Mass., in 1789; married Sarah Stewart, and settled at Wilmington, Vt. 
For a time after the death of his father he remained at home, but subse- 
quently kept public-houses in several places. At one time he owned and 
carried on the wadding-factory in Wilmington ; was sheriff in his County, 
and tilled several positions of responsibility. He was a man of large size, 
partaking, it is said, somewhat of the energetic character of the Taggarts, 
from whom he descended on his mother's side. He was a man of undis- 
turbable good nature. He was living in 1852, but died several years ago. 
I have made a great effort to collect a more complete account of this 
branch, but the descendants of Robert cannot be prevailed upon to pro- 
vide the statistics of their families ; it is presumed that they shun pub- 
licity. There were eight children, of whom hereafter. 

Thomas Riddell 3 (1), third son of Gavin' 2 (1), was born in Coleraine, 
Mass., in 1791 ; had no family. 

Jane Riddell 3 (1), second daughter of Gavin 2 (1), was born in Cole- 
raine, Mass., in 1792; no family. 

Harriet Riddell 3 (1), third daughter of Gavin 2 (1), was born in Cole- 
raine, Mass., in 1793 ; no family. 

George Riddell 3 (1), fourth son of Gavin 2 (1), was born in Coleraine, 
Mass., Jan. 12, 1796; married Mary Babcock (she was born Dec. 9, 1800), 
in 1822, and had issue nine children, of whom hereafter. He moved from 
Coleraine to Canisteo, N. Y., in 1837, and died there July 26, 1845 ; his 
widow is now (1879) living. 

Mary Riddell 3 (1), fourth daughter of Gavin 2 (1), was born in Cole- 
raine, Mass., Feb. 8, 1798; was married, first, to Benjamin Clark, by Avhom 
she had five children; and secondly, to John McClary, by whom she had 
three children. She lived at Onondaga, N. Y. 

Lovilia Riddell 3 (1), fifth daughter of Gavin 2 (1), was born in Cole- 
raine, Mass., July 8, 1802 ; was married in Coleraine, Mass., Nov. 21, 1822, 
to Lemuel Clark, of Tully, N. Y., and had issue twelve children. Died 
March 12, 1859, and was buried in Onondaga Valley Cemetery, N. Y. Mr. 
Clark was born March 26, 1799, and died Sept. 21, 1869. 

(xavill Riddell 3 (2), fifth son of Gavin 2 (1), was born in Coleraine' 
Mass., in 1804; married Arminda Babcock, and had issue nine children' 
of whom hereafter. In 1852 he was living at Coleraine, then the only one 
of the name (except his children) living there. 

Caroline Riddell 3 (1), sixth daughter of Gavin 2 (1), was born in Cole- 
raine, Mass., in November, 1806; was married to Mr. James Clark, of 
Onondaga County, N. Y., and died March 14, 1859. Buried on the same 
day as her sister Lovina, in the Onondaga Cemetery. No issue. Hus- 
band living in 1884, at Alden, N. Y. 

Polly Riddell 3 (1), eldest daughter of Robert 2 (2), was born in Cole- 
raine, Mass., Dec. 16, 1785 ; was married to Frederick Pratt, of Sullivan, 
N. Y., in 1808, and had issue seven children; she died at Fayetteville, N. 
Y., July 15, 1848. Mr. Pratt was a farmer. 

Sally Riddell 3 (1), second daughter of Robert 2 (2), was born in Cole- 



256 RIDDELLS OF COLERAINE, MASSACHUSETTS, NO. 2. 

raine, Mass., Feb. 23, 1787; was married to Uriah Aldrich, in 1809, and 
had issue. She was living in Cazenovia, N". Y., in 1852. He was a black- 
smith. 

Jemima Riddell 3 (1), third daughter of Robert' 2 (2), was born in 
Coleraine, Mass., May '28,1788; was married in 1810, to Heman Williams, 
and had issue. She was living in Pittsfield, Mich., in 1852. 

Martha Riddell 3 (1), fourth daughter of Robert' 2 (2), was born in 
Coleraine, Mass., May 17, 1790 ; was married in 1811, to James Matthews; 
lived in Syracuse, N. Y., in 1852, and had four children. Mr. Matthews 
was a manufacturer of salt; he died before 1852. 

Robert Riddell 8 (4), eldest son of Robert 2 (2), was born in Coleraine, 

Mass., Oct. 5, 1792 ; married in 1817 to , and had issue^ye children, 

of whom (with one son born of a second Avife, whom he married in 1833) 
hereafter. He was living on a farm in Chittenango, N. Y., in 1852. 

David Riddell 3 (1), second son of Robert' 2 (2), was born in Coleraine, 
Mass., Jan. 28, 1794; married in 1817, to , and had issue four chil- 
dren, of whom hereafter. He was a leather manufacturer at Chittenango, 
N. Y., in 1852. 

Susan Riddell 3 (3), youngest daughter of Robert' 2 (2), was born in 
Coleraine,* Mass.. Sept. 15, 1795; died July 4, 1808, at Sullivan, N. Y. 

Thompson Riddell 3 (1), youngest son of Robert 2 (2), was born in 
Coleraine, Mass., Oct. 2, 1798; married in 1823, and in 1838; the names 
of his wives have not reached me. He had issue two children, a son and 
daughter, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddell was a farmer in Hamilton, 
Allegan County, Mich., in 1852. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Prof. John-Leonard Riddell 4 (2), eldest son of John 3 (1), was born 
in Leyden, Mass., Feb. 20, 1807; married, first, to Mary E. Knock, and 
by her had two children ; secondly, to Ann Hennefin, and had issue sev- 
eral children, of whom (with the preceding) hereafter. In the autumn of 
1807, he was taken by his parents to Preston, N. Y., where, according to 
his own diary, written in 1834, they "moved into a log-house on the mid- 
dle of the farm; this house was surrounded at the time by a wilderness, 
but it had the advantage of being near an excellent fountain of water." 
He spent a portion of the years 1826-7, at the Oxford Academy ; subse- 
quently he went to the "Rensselaer School," at Troy, N. Y., where he 
obtained the degree of A. B. ; subsequently, A. M. * In 1830 he com- 
menced giving lectures on the sciences of chemistry, botany, and geology, 
occupying between four and five years, embracing many cities in the Uni- 
ted States and Canadas. In 1835 he was appointed "Adjunct Professor 
of Chemistry and Botany in the Cincinnati Medical College." From this 
college he received the degree of M. D. 

In 1836, he was appointed professor of chemistry in the Medical College 
of Louisiana, at New Orleans ; in 1852, he was connected with the medi- 
cal department of the University of Louisiana, under the patronage of 
the State, at which date he held that chair. He was engaged by a com- 
pany in 1838, to lead an exploring expedition into Texas, with the 
object of discovering gold and silver mines; he spent three months in 
the wilds of Texas with this company, penetrating nearly to the 



* It is presumed that all the children of Robert- (2) were born in Coleraine, Mass., 
in want of proof to the contrary. 



BIDDELLS OF COLEBAIXE, MASSACHUSETTS, NO. 2. 257 

supposed locality of the mines ; but becoming more and more annoyed 
by the Comanche Indians, judged it hazardous to remain very long. 
It was found no easy matter to discover, in so short a time, a mine, con- 
cerning which many conflicting statements had been made ; yet the object 
of the company was in part realized, since they had obtained a knowledge 
of the general mineral character of the country. For his services Mr. 
Riddell received one share in the rights of the company, equivalent to 
ten thousand acres of Texas lands. 

On his return to New Orleans, he learned of his appointment, by the 
President of the United States, as " Melter and Refiner" in the branch 
mint; this office he held till 1849. His contributions to science, in the 
meantime, had been of a varied nature. In 1835, at Cincinnati, O., he 
published a catalogue of plants, entitled "A Synopsis of the Flora of the 
Western States," including eighteen hundred different species, which may 
truly be styled one of the pioneers in the botany of the West. Subse- 
quently he published a catalogue of the plants of Louisiana, comprising 
some twenty-three hundred species. In the West, in Louisiana, and in 
Texas, he was the discoverer of numerous new species, and has, by the 
consent of botanists, left his name indelibly impressed on the science, in 
the genus named for him, Riddellia. 

In 1845 he published "A Monograph of the Dollar," including facsimile 
impressions of between five and six hundred varieties of American and 
Mexican dollars and half-dollars, both genuine and counterfeit; with the 
assay of each, and if counterfeit, pointing out the method of detection. 
The original coins were obtained from Boston, New York, and the mints 
of Philadelphia and New Orleans. He was author of numerous other 
small publications, principally delivered as lectures, and published by his 
auditors and students, such as " Orrin Lindsay's Aerial Navigation," deliv- 
ered before the People's Lyceum of New Orleans, in 1847; "Constitution 
of Matter," in 1846, published in the New Orleans Medical and Surgical 
Journal; introductory lecture on "The Natural Sciences," published in 
1852, by the medical students of the University of Louisiana, also in the 
Medical Journal. In 1836, his thesis on "Miasm and Contagion" was 
published in Cincinnati, and republished in Boston ; in which he advocated 
the theory that "organized and living corpuscles of various kinds" were 
the agents of communication in contagious diseases, and in this he was 
one of the earliest to adopt that theory, which has long since become set- 
tled. While an officer under the government, he published a short historic 
account of the mint and its operations, together with the coining process. 

In 1844 he was one of five commissioners appointed by the Governor 
and Legislature " to devise some means to protect New Orleans from in- 
undation." In 1852 he was giving his attention principally to microscopy, 
and observations connected with the animalculae and algae found in the 
swamp-waters in the vicinity of New Orleans. His widow was living in 
New Orleans in 1873. I do not know the date of his death. His son 
Sanford promised the complete genealogy and history of his father's fam- 
ily, but the MSS. seem to have been lost in the mails. 

Lephia-Maria Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of John 3 (1), was born in 
Preston, N. Y., Jan. 1, 1809 ; was married in 1829, to Ruel Crumb, and 
had issue four children. She resided at Onondaga, N. Y.; died Nov. 5, 
1840. 

Julia- Anil Riddell 4 (1), second daughter of John 3 (1), was born in 
Preston, N. Y., July 19, 1812 ; was married in 1830 to J. S. Brown, of 
17 



258 EIDDELLS OF COLEJRAINE, MASSACHUSETTS, NO. 2. 

East Troy, Wis., and had six children. Her husband was a blacksmith, 
formerly from Sherburne, N. Y. ; born July 4, 1808. 

Sauford-Alleil Riddell 4 (1), second son of John 3 (1), was born in 
Preston, N. Y., April 9, 1816; died Aug. 25, 1823. 

Samuel'Taggart Riddell 4 (1), third son of John 3 (1), was born in 
Preston, N. Y., July 4, 1818; married Lucy A. Beckwith in 1844, and 
has issue, of whom hereafter. He was named after his great-uncle, Sam- 
uel Taggart, d. d., who was a distinguished clergyman of Coleraine, 
Mass., the author of "Taggart's View," and for many years a member of 
Congress. Mr. Riddell was, during the years 1840-1-2, foreman in the 
melting and refining department, in the United States branch mint at 
New Orleans, La. He resided for a time at Preston, but moved to East 
Troy, Wis., in 1844; he returned to Preston, and was living on the old 
homestead farm in 1852. He was living in Turner, Mills County, la., in 
1876. 

Dr. George Riddell 4 (2), fourth son of John 3 (1), was born in Pres- 
ton, N. Y., June 3, 1822 ; was married by Rev. J. T. Goodrich, Oct. 10, . 
1847, to Miss Harriet M., daughter of Andrew and Philena-Davis (Bow- 
dish) Darling, of Preston, N. Y., and went back to New Orleans, where 
he was then employed in the mint. After attending the academies at 
Oxford and Norwich, N. Y., he taught school, both public and select, in 
various places ; in the spring of 1844 he was elected town superintendent 
of schools for the town of Preston ; he soon after commenced the study 
of medicine, spent three successive winters in New Orleans, attending 
medical lectures, and in 1848 received the degree of M. D. from the Uni- 
versity of Louisiana. In 1840 he spent some time in the practice of 
his profession in Oxford, N. Y. ; in 1851 he moved to Palmyra, Jefferson 
County, Wis., and practised there for many years ; there he built a beau- 
tiful house, which was surrounded by tasteful gardens, adorned with rare 
flowers and shrubbery. He separated from his wife, and married a youug 
lady while living at the latter place, his first wife retaining the house, and 
Mr. Riddell assisting in the support and education of his children. He 
l'emoved to Rome, some nine miles from Palmyra, and practised there 
some three or four years, at the end of which time he went to Chippewa 
Falls, Wis., and seems to have entered into partnership with his nephew, 
Dr. Sanford S. Riddell; it is presumed that he now (1878) resides at the 
latter place, although he has never favored me with a reply to my com- 
munications. 

Lo villa Riddell 4 (2), third daughter of John 3 (1), was born in Pres- 
ton, N. Y., Sept. 2, 1824 ; was married in January, 1848, to J. Denison Mar- 
ion, of Preston, Conn., and is now living at Preston Corners, N. Y. Mr. 
Marion is a blacksmith by trade ; is constable and collector (1852) of the 
town of Preston. Lovina lived with her aunt Loviua from 1832 to 1842, 
after which she attended the academy at Onondaga Hollow. Subse- 
quently she attended the Norwich Academy, and a select school at Plym- 
outh, then the academy at Oxford ; in the meanwhile taught school in 
several places. 

Margaret-Jaiie Riddell 4 (1), fourth daughter of John 3 (1), was born 
in Preston, N. Y., Nov. 8, 1826 ; died Sept. 20, 1845, at Preston, unmar- 
ried. 

Prof. William-P. Riddell 4 (1), fifth son of John 3 (1), was born in 
Preston, N. Y., Oct. 1, 1828, and was only five years old when his father 
died. From 1838 he lived with his sister, Mrs. Brown, for nearly five 



RIDDELLS OF COLEIiAlXE, MASSACHUSETTS, NO. 2. 259 

years, while his mother was at New Orleans. From Oxford Academy he 
went to Amherst College, Massachusetts; thence in 1848, to Yale College, 
New Haven, Conn., where he received, in 1851, his degree of A. B.; he 
was there one of the five presidents of the Lionian Society. In 1852 he 
was at New Orleans, a student of chemistry and the natural sciences, 
with his brother John in the University; and in the winters of 1851-2, 
he gave a short course of lectures on chemistry at the Louisiana College 
in New Orleans. He compiled a genealogical sketch of this branch of 
the Riddell family in 1852, which has been the basis of the present article 
in this work; much, however, has been added concerning several branches 
of the family. Mr. Riddell was shot while near his residence in Houston, 
Tex., by an assassin in 1872. He married Sarah-Glenn Chalmers, of Aus- 
tin Tex., and had two children. He is said to have been a stalwart-built 
man, broad-shouldered and full-chested, a regular athlete. He had dark 
hair and blue eyes; a receding forehead, and regular features; was social 
and kind-hearted. 

Susaii-A. Riddell 4 (4), youngest daughter of John 3 (1), was born in 
Preston, N. Y., March 24, 1831; was married in March, 1852, to Henry 
P. Marion (brother to the husband of her sister Lovina), and in that year 
was living on a farm in Preston, Conn. He was superintendent of 
schools for the town, also a Justice of the Peace and town collector. 
Susan, in 1838, went with her mother to New Orleans and remained there 
five years, returning in 1843. She attended school at Plymouth; also at 
Oxford Academy for two years. In 1849 she returned to New Orleans in 
company with her brother John and family, and remained till the follow- 
ing summer. She then returned and lived with her mother until her 
marriage. 



William Riddell 4 (2), eldest son of Robert 8 (3), was born in Wilming- 
ton, Vt. (?), in 1814; died in 1816. 

Thomas Riddell 4 (2), second son of Robert 3 (3), was born in Wil- 
mington, Vt. (?), in 1816; married , and had issue several children, 

of whom hereafter. It is said he carries on the tin-ware and stove business 
at Bennington, Vt., and that he has been a prominent man there. 

EllOS Riddell 4 (1), third son of Robert 3 (3), was born in Wilmington, 
Vt., in 1818, and in 1852 was in Boston, Mass. Resides in Olean, N. Y. 
No family. 

Sarah Riddell 4 (2), eldest daughter of Robert 3 (3), was born in Wil- 
mington, Vt., in 1823; was married to Oskar L. Shafter, and had issue. 
Mr.Shafter was a graduate of the Harvard Law School, and esteemed 
one of the best lawyers in the State of Vermont; was candidate for gov- 
ernor in 1848. He lived in a pretty, octagonal house, situated on a lot 
ornamented with shade trees, some distance from the street. He was 
said to be " a man of plain habits and frank disposition." 

Mary Riddell 4 (2), second daughter of Robert 3 (3), was born in Wil- 
mington, Vt., in 1826 ; married Franklin Lamb ; secondly, Addison Read, 
and lives in Hastings, Neb. 

William Riddell 4 (3), fourth son of Robert 3 (3), was born in Wil- 
mington, Vt., in 1829, and was of Boston in 1852; married Carrie Thayer, 
and has issue. Lives in Buffalo, N. Y. 

Samuel-Taggart Riddell 4 (2), fifth son of Robert 8 (3), was born in 
Wilmington, Vt., in 1833; married Lucretia Clark ; no issue. Resides in 
Fernandina, Florida. 



260 R1DDELLS OF COLEBAINE, MASSACHUSETTS, NO. 2. 

 \ 

Henry Riddell 4 (1), sixth son of Robert 8 (3), was born in Wilming- 
ton, Vt., March 6, l!^37 ; married Emily C, daughter of Mario R. Crosby, 
and has issue ^ue children. Was of Wilmington in 1852. 



Dr. George Riddell 4 (3), eldest son of George 8 (1), was born in Cole- 
raine, Mass.. Aug. 30, 1823; married Carrie Shurtleff, April 2, 1854, and 

by her had issue three children. His first wife died June 4, 1864, aged 31 
years. He married, secondly, Aug. 28, 1865, Mary E. Warner, and In- 
ner has three children, of whom (with the other children) hereafter. He 
attended medical lectures at Castleton, Vt., and graduated at the Univer- 
sity of New York, in the Medical College at New York city, March 10, 
1853. He has practised medicine and surgery in Canisteo, N. Y., since 
his graduation, in company with his brother. He and brothers built a 
large hotel in Bradford, Penn., in the spring of 1878, called the "Riddell 
House," which was open only a little more than four months, when it was 
burned. Their loss above insurance was about thirty thousand dollars ; 
they are rebuilding at a cost of about forty thousand dollars. He says: 
" My brothers and I are remarkable for nothing except we all work to- 
gether, never disagree on any business transaction, and have always been 
as one family." 

Mary Riddell 4 (3), eldest daughter of George 3 (1), was born in Cole- 
raine, Mass., Aug. 11, 1825; died October, 1825. 

Mary-Lovina Riddell 4 (4), second daughter of George 3 (1), was born 
in Coleraine, Mass., Feb. 15, 1827; was married at Canisteo, N. Y., June 
19, 1851, to Jonathan Quick. She died April 26, 1852, leaving an infant 
ten days old. 

Harriet-Arminda Riddell 4 (2), third daughter of George 3 (1), was 
born in Coleraine, Mass., Dec. 27, 1828; died at the age of 16, unmarried, 
March 10, 1845. 

Dea. Lorenzo-B. Riddell 4 (1), second son of George 3 (1), was born 
in Coleraine, Mass., April 25, 1831 ; married July 4, 1855, to Caroline 
Frace, and has issue four children, of whom hereafter. He is deacon of 
the Presbyterian Church in Canisteo, N. Y. ; carries on the business of 
undertaker and retail dealer in furniture. He has a good home, pleas- 
antly situated on Academy Street. Has been intimately associated with 
his brothers in business. 

Dr. LeRoy Riddell 4 (1), third son of George 3 (1), was born in Cole- 
raine, Mass., Sept. 11, 1833; married Eunice L. Pratt, Dec. 17, 1863, and 
has issue four children, of whom hereafter. He is a graduate of Uni- 
versity Medical College, New York city (1863), and is engaged in the 
practice of medicine and surgery, in company with his brother George, in 
Canisteo, N. Y., where he has an extensive patronage. He is pleasantly 
situated near the Canisteo Academy, on Academy Street. He was an 
owner in the "Riddell House," at Bradford, Penn., burned in 1878, but 
being rebuilt. 

William Riddell 4 (4), fourth son of George 3 (1), was born in Cole- 
raine, Mass., Feb. 21, 1836; married Helen Jones, daughter of David 
Jones, advocate, of New York, March 26, 1867, and has issue three chil- 
dren, of whom hereafter. He is a dealer in dry goods and groceries, in 
Canisteo, N. Y.; is prosperous, and owns a splendid residence near those 
of his brothers, on Academy Street. 

Lemuel-Clark Riddell 4 (1), fifth son of George 8 (1), was born in Can- 
isteo, N. Y., March 6, 1839, and died Aug. 23, 1868. He was in the 



RIDDELLS OF COLERAINE, MASSACHUSETTS, NO. 2. 261 

employ of the Erie Railroad Company ; was a man of great business ca- 
pacity, and much esteemed by all who knew him. Unmarried. 

Joseph-Marion Riddell 4 (1), youngest son of George 3 (1), was born 
in Canisteo, N. Y., Feb. 26, 1842; married Agnes Louder, Oct. 11, 1871, 
and has the care of his mother at Canisteo. He has no children ; owns a 
farm. 

William-G. Riddell 4 (5), eldest son of Gavin 3 (1), was born in Cole- 
raine, Mass., Dec. 20, 1828; married Semira Bemis, of Whittingham, Vt., 
Oct. 30, 1854, and had issue. He died at Boston, March 24, 1859. His 
widow is still living in Charlestown. 

John Riddell 4 (3), second son of Gavin 3 (1), was born in Coleraine, 
Mass., Oct. 7, 1830 ; married Martha-Ann Clark, of Boston, Oct. 5, 1857, 
and resided in Charlestown, Mass , where he died Oct. 3, 1859. His 
widow has married a Mr. Bassett. Mr. Riddell had issue one daughter. 

Sophronia Riddell 4 (2), eldest daughter of Gavin 3 (1), was born in 
Coleraine, Mass., Oct. 4, 1832; died Aug. 1, 1851. 

George-E. Riddell 4 (3), third son of Gavin 3 (1), was born in Cole- 
raine. Mass., and died young, unmarried. 

HolllS-T. Riddell 4 (1), fourth son of Gavin 3 (1), was born in Cole- 
raine, Mass., March 11, 1837; died unmarried. 

Elizabeth-C. Riddell 4 (1), second daughter of Gavin 3 (1), was born 
in Coleraine, Mass., Oct. 27, 1839; died unmarried. 

Mary-E. Riddell 4 (5), third daughter of Gavin 3 (1), was born in Cole- 
raine, Mass., June 2, 1842 ; died young. 

Allll-E. Riddell 4 (1), fourth daughter of Gavin 3 (1), was born in Cole- 
raine, Mass., Jan. 9, 1845 ; was married to Albert Robertson, of Ley den, 
Mass., July 3, 1864; died in Coleraine, Aug. 22, 1868. 

Mary- Jane Riddell 4 (6), youngest daughter of Gavin 3 (1), was born 
in Coleraine, Mass., Oct. 30, 1849; died unmarried. 



Charlotte-Helen Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of Robert 3 (4), wa 
born in Chittenango, N. Y., May 26, 1818. 

Frances-Lucretia Riddell 4 (1), second daughter of Robert 3 (4). 

Henrietta-Sophia Riddell 4 (2), third daughter of Robert 3 (4), was 
born in Chittenango, 1ST. Y., April 25, 1821. 

Jemima Riddell 4 (2), fourth daughter of Robert 3 (4), was born in 
Chittenango, N. Y., April 26, 1823; died July 6, 1823. 

Nancy-Marion Riddell 4 (1), fifth daughter of Robert 3 (4), was born 
in Chittenango, N. Y., Nov. 19, 1823. 



Allgeline-Fidelia Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of David 8 (1), was 
born in Chittenango, N". Y., Jan. 31, 1819. 

William-Wallace Riddell 4 (6), eldest son of David 3 (1), was born in 
Chittenango, N. Y., Oct. 20, 1820. 

Hannah-Maria Riddell 4 (1), second daughter of David 3 (1), was born 
in Chittenango, N. Y., Feb. 5, 1829 ; died Dec. 25, 1830. 

Robert-David Riddell 4 (5), second son of David 3 (1), was born in 
Chittenango, N. Y., Nov. 2, 1834. 



Sophia-R.-M. Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of Thompson 8 (1), was 
born in Hamilton, Mich., in June, 1836. 



262 RIDDELLS OF COLEEAINE, MASSACHUSETTS, NO. 2. 

Thompson Riddell 4 (2), eldest son of Thompson 3 (1), was born in 
Hamilton, Mich., Jan. 31, 1845. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

Johll-Schrager Riddell 5 (4), eldest son of John 4 (2), was born in 
New Orleans, La., April 2, 1837 ; died June 7, 1837. 

Dr. Sanford-Schrager Riddell 5 (2), son of John 4 (2), was born at 
New Orleans, La., Aug. 22, 1838; married, December, 1866, Josephine, 
daughter of Roswell K. Bourne, of Cincinnatus, N. Y., and resides at 
Chippewa Falls, Chippewa County, Wis. His literary education \v;is 
obtained in the academic department of the University of Louisiana, 
whence he graduated in March, 1860. He has been a resident of New 
Orleans, Cincinnatus, and Norwich, N. Y. He has made a special study 
of uterine diseases. During his youth for many years, lie prepared and 
performed the experiments at his father's chemical lectures, and assisted 
at his various analyses and microscopical researches, and in perfecting the 
binocular microscope (first invented by his father). While still a lad he 
discovered, described, and named a new polygonum, " Polygonum nova 
aureliensia" He is a member of the New Orleans Academy of Science, 
elected when twenty-one years of age; of the Chenango County (N. Y.), 
Medical Society ; of the Chippewa Falls Medical Society, of which he 
was one of the organizers, and for some time secretary and treasurer ; 
also, of the Chippewa County Medical Society, into which the Falls so- 
ciety merged. He is also a member of the American Medical Association. 
His contributions to professional literature consist of a few minor articles 
to medical journals. At the age of twenty-two he was called to the chair 
of chemistrv and metallurgy in the New Orleans Dental College ; was as- 
sistant to the Texas State Geologist, in 1860. He was three months in the 
Rebel army, but refused to serve after the capture of New Orleans. He 
was afterwards captain of a company in the Fifth Louisiana White In- 
fantry, United States Army. Mr. Riddell is regarded as a man of scien- 
tific ability seldom excelled, and is eminent as a medical practitioner. 

Edward-Henry Riddell 5 (1), third son of John 4 (2), was born in New 
Orleans, La., Nov. 18, 1841 ; married to a French lady in New Orleans. 

John-William Riddell 5 (5), fourth son of John 4 (2), was born in New 
Orleans, La., Dec. 2, 1844; unmarried. 

Lephe-Ellgeilia Riddell 5 (2), eldest daughter of John 4 (2), was mar- 
ried to York A. Woodward, a banker, of New Orleans, where they reside. 

Mary- Angelica Riddell 5 (7), second daughter of John 4 (2), was born 
at New Orleans, La. ; was married to Robert F. Hogsett, of New Or- 
leans ; deceased. 

Adelaide Riddell 5 (1), third daughter of John 4 (2), was born at New 
Orleans, La.; married Albert P. House, and resides at New Orleans. 

Robert-B. Riddell 5 (f>), fifth son of John 4 (2), was born at New Or- 
leans, La. 

Peter-G. Riddell 5 (1), sixth son of John 4 (2), was born at New Or- 
leans, La. 

Jeffei'SOn-D. Riddell 5 (1), seventh son of John 4 (2), was born at New 
Orleans, La. 

Leplie-Ann Riddell 5 (3), eldest daughter of Samuel 4 (1), was born in 
Preston, N. Y., Feb. 7, 1846; was married to Charles Bentley, and lives 
at Hastings, Mills County, la. 



BIDDELLS OF COLEBAINE, MASSACHUSETTS, WO. 2. 263 

Mary-Jane Riddell 6 (8), second daughter of Samuel 4 (1), was born in 
Preston, N. Y., Jan. 13, 1848; was married to Elisha Lewis, and lives in 
Chautauqua County, N. Y. 

Slisail-Lovina Riddell 5 (5), third daughter of Samuel 4 (1), was born 
in Preston, N. Y., Jan. 4, 1850 ; was married. 

Emma Riddell 5 (1), fourth daughter of Samuel 4 (1). 

Addie-D. Riddell 5 (1), fifth daughter of Samuel 4 (1). 

Harriet-Georgiana Riddell 5 (3), eldest daughter of George 4 (2), was 
born in Palmyra, Wis., July 2, 1851 She has acquired a good English 
education, and has also become a teacher of vocal and instrumental music. 
She is a cultured and accomplished young lady, but in a delicate condi- 
tion of health. Unmarried in 1874.* 

Frank-Darling Riddell 5 (1), eldest son of George 4 (2), was born in 
Palmyra, Wis , April 5, 1854; married, and has settled at Rochelle, 111. 
He is a telegraph operator, and skilled in his profession. 



Alirelia Riddell 5 (1), eldest daughter of Thomas 4 (2), was born in 
Bennington, Vt., in 1839. 

Henry Riddell 5 (2), eldest son of Thomas 4 (2), was born in Benning- 
ton, Vt., in 1842. 

Theodore Riddell 5 (1), second son of Thomas 4 (2), was born in Ben- 
nington, Vt., in 1845. 

Robert-H. Riddell 5 (7), eldest son of Henry 4 (1), was born in Ben- 
nington, Vt., April 2, 1859; married, and has issue one son (1884). Mr. 
Riddell is a dry-goods merchant in Boston, Mass. 

Sally Riddell 5 (2), eldest daughter of Henry 4 (1), died young. 

Florence Riddell 5 (1), second daughter of Henry 4 (1), died young. 

William-C. Riddell 5 (7), second son of Henry 4 (1), was born Dec. 
13, 1868. In college at Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Marlo-H. Riddell 5 (1), third son of Henry 4 (1), was born May 28, 
1871-2. 

Chester Riddell 5 (1), eldest son of George 4 (3), was born in Canisteo, 
N. Y., Feb. 14, 1855; died April 17, 1855. 

Lizzie-E. Riddell 5 (1), eldest daughter of George 4 (3), was born in 
Canisteo, N. Y., April 11, 1856; unmarried in 1878. 

Sarah-Tavlor Riddell 5 (2), second daughter of George 4 (3), was born 
in Canisteo, N. Y., Jan. 10, 1859 ; died March 20, 1872. 

Carrie-Lee Riddell 5 (1), third daughter of George 4 (3), was born in 
Canisteo, N. Y., Jan. 2, 1867. 

Frank Riddell 5 (2), second son of George 4 (3), was born in Canisteo, 
N. Y., Aucr. 13, 1870. 

William-C. Riddell 5 (8), third son of George 4 (3), was born in Can- 
isteo, N. Y., Nov. 9, 1876. 

Scott Riddell 5 (1), eldest son of Lorenzo 4 (1), was born in Canisteo, 
N. Y., July 11, 1855. 

* Mrs. Riddell. the mother of these children, married, secondly, to Simon Bunker, 
and is said to be "a lady in every respect," and is highly esteemed by all whose 
respect is worth having. 



264 RIDDLES OF CHABLESTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS. 

Sarah Riddell 5 (3), eldest daughter of Lorenzo 4 (1), was born in Can- 
isteo, N. Y., May 27, 1859. 

Lemuel Riddell 5 (2), second son of Lorenzo 4 (1), was born is Canis- 
teo, N. Y., in December, 1868. 

Laura-E. Riddell 5 (1), second daughter of Lorenzo 4 (1), was born in 
Canisteo, N. Y., July 15, 1871. 

Pratt Riddell 5 (1), eldest son of LeRoy 4 (1), was born in Canisteo, 
N. Y., Oct. 20, 1864. 

John Riddell 5 (6), second son of LeRoy 4 (1), was born in Canisteo, 
N. Y., Jan. 14, 1866. 

Elmira Riddell 5 (1), eldest daughter of LeRoy 4 (1), was born in Can- 
isteo, N. Y., Nov. 12, 1868. 

Harriet Riddell 5 (4), second daughter of LeRoy 4 (1), was born in 
Canisteo, N. Y., Dec. 4, 1874. 



Nettie-M. Riddell 5 (1), eldest daughter of William 4 (4), was born in 
Canisteo, N. Y., Oct. 5, 1868. 

George Riddell 5 (4), eldest son of William 4 (4), was born in Canis- 
teo, N. Y., Jan. 31, 1870. 

Sarah-A. Riddell 5 (4), second daughter of William 4 (4), was born in 
Canisteo, X. Y., Aug. 9, 1876. 



RIDDLES OF CHARLESTON, MASSACHUSETTS. 

Edward Riddle 1 (1) was a well-known auctioneer many years in Bos- 
ton ; his parentage is not known to me. The family could have provided 
necessary particulars, but declined to do so. He married Charlotte, 
daughter of Edward and Elizabeth Cutter, Sept. 30, 1841, and fixed his 
residence in Charlestown, Mass. He went to England with a commission 
from the United States Government. Was a man of popularity ; highly 
esteemed. Deceased. 

William Riddle 1 (1), brother of the above, was many years in Boston, 
but went to California, and died there in the autumn of 1881, unmarried. 

James Riddle 1 (1), brother of the preceding, was sometime of Bos- 
ton, but removed to California, and died there in 1881, leaving a daughter. 

Cordelia Riddle 1 (1), sister of the preceding, was an actress for many 
years. She made her debut at the Arch-street Theatre, Philadelphia, as 
Albert, in " William Tell," Jan. 23, 1834. She is now (1883) Mrs. San- 
ford, living at Newport, R. I., and very feeble. 

Eliza Riddle 1 (1), sister of the preceding, (born in Philadelphia (?), 
made her first appearance as an actress, on the stage of the Walnnt-streel 
Theatre, Philadelphia, in 1823, as Charles, in "Laugh When You Can." 
Her first engagement in Xew York, though she was extremely youthful, 
won for her the attention and commendation of the people. She nexl 
appeared as Emily YVorthington; then as Rosalie Somers Paul ( k - Wan- 
dering Boys") Virginia; and for her benefit, in October of that year, as 
Cora and Little Fickle. After an absence from New York for more than 



RIDDLES OF CHARLESTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS. 265 

a quarter of a century, during which, as Mrs. William Smith,* — the name 
of her husband, — she had played with remarkable success at Philadelphia 
and Boston, and ranked with the first favorites of the day, particularly in 
comedy of every grade. She re-appeared in 1856, at Laura Keen's Thea- 
tre, and at Barton's in 1857-8, in the line of middle-aged, fashionable 
dowagers, country women, and Abigails of every degree, with credit to 
herself and satisfaction to the public. She last played in New York at 
the Winter Gardens, in 1859-60. She took her farewell of the stage at 
the Howard Athenaeum, Boston, in 1861. She died in Boston, of a lin- 
gering and painful illness, in 1861, leaving a daughter, Mrs. Sedley Brown, 
who has since become a favorite comedienne. Kate Field is a daughter 
of one of the sisters of Edward Riddle, but I do not know which one. 
Her father was J. M. Field. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Elizabeth-Cutter Riddle 2 (1), eldest daughter of Edward 1 (1), was 
born in Boston (or Charlestown), Mass., Sept. 28, 1842. 

Ckarlotta-Cordelia Kiddle 2 (1), second daughter of Edward 1 (1), 
was born in Charlestown, Mass., Oct. 5, 1847. 

Edward-Cutter Riddle 2 (2), eldest son of Edward 1 (1), was born in 
Charlestown, Mass., Oct. 10, 1849, and was for many years engaged in 
trade in Boston. 

Prof. George-Peabody Riddle 2 (1), second son of Edward 1 (1), born 
in Charlestown, Mass., in 1851, and displayed an inclination for the the- 
atrical profession at the age of four, having come from a family which for 
three generations has been represented on the American stage. When 
five years of age he saw played "Midsummer Night's Dream," which 
gave him singular emotions and greatly inspired his genius; he was when 
a child a promoter of amateur theatricals, and was his own manager. 

His parents insisted that he should take a course at Harvard College 
before going upon the stage, but while at the University dreams of a the- 
atrical career continually intruded upon his scholastic routine. At length 
Fechter came to Boston, and to him the aspirant for dramatic honors con- 
fided his hopes, with such result, that the great actor offered him a place 
in his company. How to satisfy his dearest ambition, and, at the same 
time, to comply with his parents' desire that he should graduate in due 
form was the problem that presented itself to the enthusiastic student. 
He thought he might become an actor, and still keep up his college stud- 
ies. This plan he submitted to President Eliot, in a note, which drew 
forth a reply so characteristic that a quotation must be given : — 

" March 29, 1872. 
" Dear Sir, — It would be quite impossible for you to be an actor, and, at the same 
time, keep up your college studies and take a degree. You cannot burn a candle at 
both ends. The stage is a very laborious and exigent profession. That you chose 
it at the age of four is not an argument for choosing it at twenty-four. I remem- 
ber having a conviction at that age that I might be a farmer. Let me advise you 
strenuously to complete your education — so far, at least, as to go through college 
and to see a little more of real life before you commit yourself to the calling of an 
actor." 

Excellent advice, for heeding which, Mr. Riddle now has his reward. 
But the dramatic instinct must needs be satisfied, and, while still an 

♦Eliza Riddle, born in Philadelphia, made her debut Jan. 14, 1835, as Julia in 
" Hunchback," at Walnut-street Theatre. Was she identical with the above Mrs. 
Smith ? 



266 RIDDLES OF CHARLESTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS. 

undergraduate, we find young Riddle giving readings in private houses. 
Among his auditors were Longfellow, the poet, and Professor Pierce, the 
mathematician, both of whom gave him the strongest encouragement to 
persevere in the dramatic career. At this period he formed the acquain- 
tance and received the encouragement of Edwin Booth. 

On leaving college in 1 874, Mr. Riddle sought a manager under whom 
to give readings. Mr. Redpath was first applied to, but at first actually 
refused to listen to him. After much persuasion, Redpath consented to 
hear him read, premising, by way of encouragement, "I've got to take 
the nine o'clock train, and you'll have to hurry."' Redpath Listened and 
allowed himself to miss his train. Mr. Riddle made his debut as a reader 
in October, 1874, at the Meionaon, and achieved a success, receiving the 
warm welcome of the press of the city. At this time he began the study 
of Romeo, and went to New York to secure an opening there on the 
stage, but no manager would listen to him. Coming back to Boston, Mr. 
Riddle made bold to address himself to Mr. Tompkins, of the Boston 
Theatre. That gentleman, having a Saturday "off" night the following 
week, it was arranged then and there that Mr. Riddle should play Romeo 
to Mrs. Thomas Barry's Juliet. The audience was large, and the perform- 
ance a pecuniary success. The general verdict of the critics was that 
Mr. Riddle's Romeo was creditable to an amateur, but his voice, still his 
weak point, was pronounced "too light, and lacking in body." The 
following month Mr. Riddle played Titus to the Brutus of Edwin Booth. 
At the conclusion of the play Mr. Booth took him before the curtain to 
share the generous applause of the audience. It was on this night that 
Mr. Booth said to Mr. Tompkins, "That young man will be famous." 
After this appearance, Mr. Riddle went to New York, where he gave 
readings at the Union Square Theatre of an afternoon. Opinions differed 
in New York as to his merits as a reader. William Winter criticised 
him severely ; and the general verdict of New York critics, as opposed to 
that of Boston, was that Mr. Riddle could not read. However, the read- 
ing was scarcely over when Mr. Palmer, of the Union Square Theatre, 
made him an offer to join his stock company, and at the same time came 
a similar offer from Mr. Field, of the Boston Museum. Mr. Riddle ac- 
cepted the Boston offer, and entered the Museum company as "walking 
gentleman," and then, in very reality, began to learn his trade. 

He made his debut in the season of 1875-6 as Capt. Dudley Smooth, in 
"Money." The part was a failure, but, although unsuccessful at the Mu- 
seum, Mr. Riddle learned a good deal. The verdict of the critics regard- 
ing his voice remained unchanged. He was in the situation of Demos- 
thenes when that stammering young man was told he could never become 
an orator. 

Heartily discouraged, yet impelled by his love of the dramatic art to 
persevere, Mr. Riddle -went to Montreal, where he found an opening in a 
newly-formed stock company. He made his first appearance on the Mon- 
treal stage as Manuel, in the "Romance of a Poor Young Man." He 
fairly jumped into popularity in the Canadian city, and received a hand- 
some benefit from an enthusiastic audience. At Montreal Mr. Riddle took 
all sorts of parts. He was by turn, walking or leading man, villain, and 
old man. This varied experience, playing a new part nearly every night. 
was of immense benefit to him. It was there that he acquired an aptitude 
for the speedy acquisition of parts. He was engaged at Montreal for a 
second season, but the people got wearied of their toy, the new stock 



BIDDLES OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. 267 

company, and from Montreal Mr. Riddle went to Philadelphia, and ob- 
tained an engagement to play at the Chestnut-street Theatre. The first 
question addressed him, on arriving, by the manager, was, " Mr. Riddle, 
have you any voice?" "Let us settle that now," replied Mr. Riddle; 
" let me go on the stage and recite something to you." The trial was 
satisfactory, and he was engaged forthwith. That was a Friday, and the 
following Monday Mr. Riddle appeared as Clifford, in the " Hunchback." 
The Philadelphia press gave him a favorable verdict, and he remained at 
the theatre five weeks, when, being out of the bill, he came to Boston on 
a visit. During that visit Professor Pierce invited him to give a reading 
at his house in Cambridge on an afternoon. President Eliot was of the 
little company assembled in Professor Pierce's parlor, and took occasion 
to ask Mr. Riddle to accept the place of substitute to Professor Baxter, 
the instructor in elocution, who was then ill. Mr. Riddle declined out- 
right, for he had, as he thought, fairly entered on his dramatic career, but 
President Eliot, in his quiet way, said : " I will give you two days to con- 
sider the matter," thus implying that he was not ready to take " No" for 
an answer. The result was that Mr. Riddle assented, and became in- 
structor of elocution at Harvard, a position he still holds. The place has 
been of the greatest value to him, in that by training the voices of others 
he has been able to overcome his old defect of insufficient voice. Since 
his return to Boston, Mr. Riddle has given readings throughout New Eng- 
land, and has achieved great and merited success. 

Mr. Riddle appeared at the Boston Theatre in 1881, playing Claude to 
Miss Mary Anderson's Pauline, and his performance was a great success, 
the audience being the largest ever seen in the theatre. He was the chief 
actor in the tragedy of "CEdipus" in the Greek drama at Harvard Univer- 
sity, and proved such a success that his fame was established. Mr. Rid- 
dle's acting has been criticised as more modern than Greek, some contend- 
ing that, in the Greek drama, there was little passion and forceful acting ; 
but Mr. Riddle's conception of his part has received the approval of high 
classical authority, the hearty praise and commendation of learned and 
enthusiastic classical scholars. It is not a little curious that the classical 
glory which has come to the venerable university, should have come by 
the first actor graduated therefrom. 



RIDDLES OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. 

Richard Riddle 1 (1), descended from Scottish ancestors, was born in 
Dublin, Ireland, about 1802; married Catherine Eustes, and had issue six 
children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddle came to Boston, Mass., many 
years ago, and engaged in the blacksmith and carriage-building business. 
He died about 1879-80, and was succeeded in the business by his two 
sons, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddle had brothers in Ireland. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Sarah Riddle 2 (1), a daughter of Richard 1 (1), was married to Wil- 
liam Conners, of Maine; resides in Boston, 



268 BIEDELS OF DOUGLASS. MASSACHUSETTS. 

John Riddle 2 (1), a son of Richard 1 (l),is in the blacksmith and car- 
riage business, in company with his brother, in Boston, Mass., unmarried. 

Mary Riddle' 2 (1), a daughter of Richard 1 (1), was the wife of Thomas 
Dolen ; deceased. 

Catherine Riddle 2 (1), a daughter of Richard 1 (1), now keeping a 
hair store and wig manufactory in the city of Boston, where she has long 
been established ; unmarried. 

Patrick Riddle 2 (1), a son of Richard 1 (1), is in the carriage and 
blacksmith business in Boston. 

Richard Riddle 2 (2), youngest son of Richard 1 (1), has been many 
years a book-keeper for dry-goods houses. 



RIEDELS OF DOUGLASS, MASSACHUSETTS. 

[French Branch.] 

Jollll-H. Riedel 1 (1) was one of the two brothers who sailed from 
France for America, presumably about 1760. Of his early life nothing is 
known. He served in an American cavalry regiment during the war of 
the Revolution, and passed the latter years of his life in Douglass, Mass. 
Whether he was a resident of that town at the time of his enlistment, or 
settled there after the expiration of his term of military service, is not 
recorded. He married an English lady named Clark, and had issue four- 
teen children,* nearly all of whom were born in Douglass. He was a Pro- 
testant in religion, and was wont to tell of the persecution his Huguenot 
ancestors had endured in the old country. His French Bible, sabre, camp 
utensils, military accoutrements, and other personal effects were in exist- 
ence fifty years ago, but their present whereabouts is unknown. He died 
about 180(3, and was buried in Douglass. The historian of the town in- 
forms me that the old family residence was known as the " Riddle House," 
when he was young. About 1850, and not later than 1855, a grandson, 
of Boston, visited Douglass for the purpose of settling the estate, and to 
sell the house and farm which had remained in the family, and on his re- 
turn described the house as being a large, rambling affair, situated on an 
elevation on the "Mail Road." The estate was sold to John Floyd, — at 
that time connected with one of the railroads in that section, — who cleared 
off the timber for the road. At this time there was a dispute among 
some members of the family as to the propriety of spelling the surname 
"Riedell." The grandson, — John H. Riedel, of Boston, — after consider- 
able search unearthed the old gentleman's sign and found his grave-stone : 
the name was spelled "Riedel" in both instances. Evidently this man 
was a direct descendant of some of the ancient houses of Ridel, in Nor- 
mandy. This is the only branch in New England known to have spelled 
the name in the German form, except a few small families recently from 
Saxony and Bavaria. 

* There are several descendants of John II. Riedel now living in New England, — 
some in Boston. — among them John H. Riedell, formerly editor of the Union, 
Manchester, N. H. 



RID DELLS OF NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS. 269 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Henry Riedel 2 (1), eldest son of John 1 (1), had grown to manhood 
when his father died, and was a carpenter by trade. He lived and died 
a bachelor, and was buried in Douglass or vicinity. The younger sons 
were apprenticed to him with one exception. 

George Riedel 2 (1), second son of John 1 (1), went West in early life, 
and never returned to Massachusetts. 

Armaild Riedel 2 (1), a son of John 1 (1), was a confirmed invalid from 
his youth, and died when young, — presumably in Douglass. 

James Riedel 2 (1), a son of John 1 (1), lived in Worcester, Mass., nearly 
all his life; was twice married, and had one daughter, now Mrs. Samuel 
Dill, Norwich, Conn. 

John-St.Clair Riedel 2 (2), son of John 1 (1), was born in Douglass, 
Mass., in 1789. He resided in that town during his boyhood, and moved 
away after learning his trade. He married Ann Aldrich, of Smithfield, 
R. I., in 1811, after which he returned to his native town, and five of his 
ten children were born there. He removed to Boston in 1823, and lived 
in that city until his death, in 1843. He was a carpenter and builder 
during his residence in Douglass. His widow is still (1884) living, at 
the age of 88 years. 

Sally Riedel 2 (1), a daughter of John 1 (1), was married to a man 
named Marsh, and lived in or near the city of Worcestor for many years, 
and died at Woonsocket, R. I. A daughter, Mary-Ann Marsh, was the 
wife of Alfred Morse, for many years a prominent manufacturer, of 
Farmersville, Mass. 

Betsey Riedel 2 (1), a daughter of John 1 (1). ) v i 

Fanny Riedel 2 (1), a daughter of John 1 (1). \ ^° reoorUs - 



RIDDELLS OF NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS. 

[Scottish Branch.] 

Samuel Riddell 1 (1 ), supposed to have been born in Scotland,* settled 
in Waterford, Ireland, where he married and had issue two sons, of whom 

*When Lindsey Riddell, of Nantucket, Mass., was a young man he was in the 
port of Glasgow, Scotland, in command of the ship "Falcon," and while there he 
went with the consignee to the city, where, when waiting at the hotel for the re- 
turn of his friend, he observed the name "Lindsey Riddell" on a sign across the 
street. The store was that of a haberdasher, and being in want of some small 
wares Captain Riddell went over and made some purchases. The clerk asked his 
name for the purpose of making a bill, and when he learned it was Lindsey Riddell 
he gave his customer a discriminating look and asked what part of the world he 
was from. The reply was " Mf ssachusetts, North America." He then inquired 
what information Captain Riddell could give of his family, and after hearing, stated 
that his father was an aged man ; that many years before a favorite brother of his 
father went to Ireland, since when no news had reached the family in Scotland con- 
cerning him, and he had no doubt, from the account given by Captain Riddell, 
that this long-lost brother was his grandfather. Captain Riddell made an appoint- 
ment to visit the old gentleman on another day, but returned to his ship and failed 
to keep it, — a neglect he always afterwards regretted. From records of marriages 
of Riddells with Lindseys, in Scotland, there was at one time a prospect of making 
genealogical connections between them and the Nantucket family, but further in- 
vestigation of the family history showed the hope unfounded. 



270 RIDDELLS OF NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS. 

hereafter. He died in Ireland, and his widow was married to a man 
named Barber, — what became of him is not known, — and with her two 
sons came to Boston, Mass. She died in Nantucket, Sept. 10, 1793, aged 
82 years, hence she was born in 1711. Her name was Susanna. 

Samuel Riddell 2 (2), eldest son of Samuel 1 (1), was born in Water- 
ford, Ireland, Dec. 22, 1748; came to Boston, Mass., with his mother and 
brother when a child ; married, Jan. 19, 1769, to Judith, daughter of 
Jonathan and Mehitable Coleman (she was born Dec. 21, 1751, and died 
Sept. 15, 1822, aged 70 years and 9 months) ; the ceremony was performed 
by Kev. Bazaleel Shaw, at Nantucket, where Mr. Riddell had previously 
served his time as an apprentice to Samuel Storer, rope-maker. He settled 
permanently at Nantucket, and kept a hardware store and carried on the 
manufacture of ropes and cordage. His house was on Fair Street. Mr. 
Riddell was a portly, fine-looking gentleman, always dressed in Avhat was 
then called "small-clothes." He was of medium height, and of fair, fresh 
complexion. In manners he was urbane and dignified in his general in- 
tercourse, but on occasions could be very jovial and hilarious. He was 
indeed a typical gentleman of the "old school." Died Oct. 20, 1823, 
aged 74 years, having had issue fifteen children, four of whom were liv- 
ing in 1847, and his descendants, numbering hundreds, are scattered from 
Maine to California. 

James Riddell 2 (1), second son of Samuel 1 (1), was born in Ireland, 
and came with his mother to Boston, Mass., when a child or young man, 
before the Revolution. He married Elizabeth R^yder, widow of Robert 
Rilyder, and daughter of Zachariah and Desire (Gorham) Bunker (she 
was born July 18, 1738), and had one daughter, of whom hereafter. Mr. 
Riddell was at one time engaged in the lumber business in Boston. He 
finally went to Nantucket to live, and is supposed to have died at sea. 
The widow Elizabeth was married to Barnabas Briggs, for her third hus- 
band. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Henry Riddell 3 (1), eldest son of Samuel 2 (2), was born at Nantucket, 
Mass., Nov. 23, 1769 ; married, April 14, 1789, Sally, daughter of Joshua 
and Catherine Coffin (she was born Feb. 6, 1769), and secondly, Feb. 10, 
1799, Hepsibah, daughter of William and Abigail Wyer, and widow of 
Solomon Coleman. She died Aug. 20, 1838, and he married thirdly, 
Peggy, widow of Alfred Coffin, who was born Oct. 8, 1784, and died Sept. 
5, 1865. Mr. Riddell was a very worthy, and highly respected man ; 
carried on rope-making; was many years a deacon of the second Congre- 
gational Church, at Nantucket, where he died Sept. 4, 1840, aged 71 
years. He had issue, by two wives, ten children, of whom hereafter. 

Capt. William Riddell 3 (1), second son of Samnel 2 (2), was born at 
Nantucket, Mass., April 15, 1772; married Elizabeth, daughter of Jethro 
and Margaret Hussey (she was born Oct. 19, 1773), by Rev. Bazaleel 
Shaw, June 21, 1792, and settled at Nantucket. He was a captain of 
merchant vessels, and made voyages to foreign countries. His house 
was on Maine Street, where his widow, for a number of years, kept a 
dry-goods store. They had eight children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Rid- 
dell died Aug. 4, 1817, his widow in August, 1846. 

Samuel-Storer Riddell 3 (3), third son of Samuel 2 (2), was born at 
Nantucket, Mass., Sept. 3, 1773, and died ycxing, unmarried. 

Susan Riddell 3 (1), eldest daughter of Samuel 2 (2), was born at Nan- 
tucket, Mass., June 23, 1775; was married Nov. 3, 1797, by Josiah Coffin, 



BIDDELLS OF NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS. 271 

Justice of the Peace, to Timothy, son of William Wyer, and died March 
31, 1842. 

Capt. Lilldsey Riddell 3 (1), fourth son of Samuel 2 (2), was born at 
Nantucket, Mass., Oct. 6, 1776; married, Feb 28, 1799, Margaret, daughter 
of Walter and Judith Brock, who was born May 23, 1781. He was a 
master of merchant ships, sailing to foreign ports. Had no children. He 
was a very large man, and died March 9, 1841, from injuries received 
from falling down stairs. His widow died March 30, 1861. 

Samuel Riddell 3 (4), was a twin son of Samuel 2 (2), born at Nan- 
tucket, Mass., Feb. 28, 1780 ; died March 29, 1780. 

Seth Riddell 3 (1) was a twin brother of Samuel 3 (4), born at Nan- 
tucket, Mass., Feb. 28, 1780 ; died March 31, 1780. 

Charles Riddell 3 (1), seventh son of Samuel 2 (2), was born at Nan- 
tucket, Mass., April 9, 1781, and was killed by a whale at sea in the year 
1799 ; unmarried. 

Thomas Riddell 3 (1), eighth son of Samuel' 2 (2), was born at Nan- 
tucket, Mass., May 14, 1783 ; married Hannah, daughter of John How- 
land, of New Bedford ; had three children, of whom hereafter, and died 
Dec. 24, 1753. He moved to New Bedford in 1810, and was a merchant 
and ship-owner in good circumstances. He died at Newport, R. I. 

George Riddell 3 (1), ninth son of Samuel 2 (2), was born at Nantucket, 
Mass., Aug. 16, 1785 ; and died March 20, 1789. 

Naiicy Riddell 3 (1), second daughter of Samuel 2 (2), was born at 
Nantucket, Mass., Dec. 16, 1786, and died July, 1788. 

Mary Riddell 3 (1), third daughter of Samuel 2 (2), was born at Nan- 
tucket, Mass., June 26, 1789; was married Nov. 5, 1815, by Rev. Seth F. 
Swift, to James Norton, of Edgartown, and secondly, March 27, 1825 (by 
same clergyman), to William J. Simpson, of England. 

Naiicy Riddell 3 (2), fourth daughter of Samuel 2 (2), was born at 
Nantucket, Mass., May 28, 1791 ; married by Rev. Seth F. Swift, June 
22, 1815, to Reuben G., son of Seth Folger. She died July 20, 1818. 

Capt. John Riddell 3 (1), tenth son of Samuel 2 (2), was born May 
28, 1791; married by Rev. Seth F. Swift, April 18, 1811, to Ann, daughter 
of Reuben and Anna Starbuck (she was born April 3, 1794), and settled 
at Nantucket. He was many years master of a packet ship. He died 
Nov. 2, 1873, and his widow still survives. They had nine children, 
six of whom died young. 

Sophroilia Riddell 3 (1), fifth daughter of Samuel 2 (2), was born at 
Nantucket, Mass., Aug. 15, 1795; married Aug. 22, 1813, by Rev. Seth 
F. Swift, to Joseph F., son of Gideon Worth. She died Dec. 7, 1872. 



Elizabeth Riddell 3 (1), a daughter of that James 2 (1) who came 
from Ireland with his mother, was born Nov. 10, 1761 (probably in Bos- 
ton) ; married Grafton, son of Peleg and Elizabeth Swain, and died May 

18, 1834. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

George-W. Riddell 4 (2), eldest son of Henry 3 (1), was born at Nan- 
tucket, Mass., Sept. 5, 1789; a i-ope-maker by trade; was lost while going 
to Virginia, in the schooner " Cornelia," Capt. Edmund Macy, master, 
Nov. 23, 1809. 

Joslma-Coffill Riddell 4 (1), second son of Henry 8 (1), was born at 
Nantucket, Mass., Aug. 22, 1792 ; married, Nov. 25, 1810, by Rev. Seth 
Swift, Nancy, daughter of Benjamin and Judith Glover (she was born 



272 lilDDELLS OF NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS. 

Sept. 18, 1789), and was a rope-maker and whaleman. He died May 4, 
1837, and his wife, Aug. 18, 1835.* They had four children, of whom 
hereafter. 

Capt. Samuel-Storer Riddell 4 (5), third son of Henry 3 (1), was born 
at Nantucket, Mass., Oct. 19, 1797; married, Sept. 6, 182*1, by Rev. Seth 
F. Swift, Judith, daughter of Zacheus Marcy, and widow of Willard 
Marcy (she was born June 27, 1801), and settled at Nantucket. He was 
captain of the whale ship "Oreno," and was killed, with the most of his 
men, in 1825, by the savages of the Fiji Islands. His widow married for 
her third husband, George H., son of Joseph Chase. These had no chil- 
dren. 

Sarah-C. Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of Henry 3 (1), was born at 
Nantucket, Mass., Feb. 14, 1795; married, March 31, 1814, by Rev. Mr. 
Swift, to William J. Simpson, an Englishman. She died in New Bedford, 
in June, 1824. 

Mary-C. Riddell 4 (2), second daughter of Henry 3 (1), and eldest by 
his second wife (Hepsibah Coleman), was born May 5, 1800; married in 
1819, to Capt. George Pollard, Jr. Is presumed to be living, 1874. 

William-Henry Riddell 4 (2), fourth son of Henry 3 (lj, was born at 
Nantucket, Mass., Oct. 22, 1801 ; married, Nov. 12, 1828, by Rev. Mr. 
Swift, Eliza-Ann, daughter of George Pollard (she was born Feb. 5, 1805), 
and was a rope-maker by trade. He had ttoo children, and died in Bos- 
ton, Feb. 27, 1846. 

Benjamin-Franklin Riddell 4 (1), fifth son of Henry 3 (1), was born 
at Nantucket, Mass., Nov. 28, 1802; died young. 

Capt. Benjamin-Franklin Riddell 4 (2), sixth son of Henry 3 (1), 
was born at Nantucket, Mass., Feb. 23, 1804; married, June 20, 1831, by 
Rev. Mr. Swift, Lydia, daughter of Joseph and Lydia Coffin, and built a 
house on Center Street, Nantucket. He was a master of merchant and 
whale ships, and died of yellow fever, at Montego Bay, Aug. 22, 1862. 
His widow still survives. They had four children, of whom hereafter. 

Capt. Timothy- W. Riddell 4 (1), seventh son of Henry 3 (1), was born 
at Nantucket, Mass., Jan. 5, 1806; married, April 8, 1830, by Rev. Mr. 
Swift, Charlotte C, daughter of Joseph, Jr., and Polly Chase. She was 
born July 15, 1806. He was for many years a master of whaling vessels, 
but was afterwards an auctioneer. He is not doing business at present 
(1874). His wife keeps a dry-goods store on Center Street, Nantucket; 
their residence is on Quincy Street. They have had six children, of whom 
hereafter. 

Susan-W. Riddell 4 (2), third daughter of Henry 3 (1), was born at 
Nantucket, Mass., Aug. 8, 1808 ; was married Oct. 4, 1832, by Rev. Mr. 
Swift, to Cromwell Barnard, Jr. 



Josiali-Hnssey Riddell 4 (1), eldest son of William 3 (1), was born at 
Nantucket, Mass., March 13, 1793; married, Feb. 25, 1813, Eunice G., 
daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth Sission (she was born Oct. 19, 1793), and 
settled in his native town. Mr. Riddell was an auctioneer and trader, and 
died of cholera in New York city, Sept. 5, 1832. His widow resides at 
Nantucket. They had twelve children, of whom hereafter; four died in 
infancy. 

* His daughter says he died in June, 1836. One account states that Mrs. Naucy 
Riddell died of derangement, Sept. 2, 1835. 



riddells of Nantucket, Massachusetts. 273 

William Riddell 4 (3), second son of William 3 (1), was born at Nan- 
tucket, Mass., March 13, 1795, and died young ; unmarried. 

Eliza Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of William 3 (1), was born at Nan- 
tucket, Mass., Feb. '20, 1798 ; was married to Frederick, son of Benjamin 
and Abigail Cartwright, and died at Brooklyn, N. Y., June 26, 1827. 

Charles-William Riddell 4 (2), third son of William 3 (1), was born 
at Nantucket, Mass., April 18, 1799; married, by Rev. S. F. Swift, Sept. 
25, 1821, Emeline, daughter of Moses and Hepsibah Bunker (she was 
born May 24, 1804), and was in early life a seaman. He moved to New 
York, and was for many yeai's a police officer. He died at Williamsburgh, 
N. Y., Jan. 16, 1846; his widow died Dec. 25, 1865. They had eight 
children, of whom hereafter. 

Capt. Alexander Riddell 4 (1), fourth son of William 3 (1), was born 
at Nantucket, Mass., Sept. 16, 1802; married, Jan. 1, 1826, by Rev. 
Daniel Filmore, Sarah, daughter of James and Polly Russell (she was 
born April 19, 1803), and had no children; both of them died in Benicia, 
Cal. He was a merchant captain. He died in April, 1855; his widow, 
April 24, 1865. 

Peggy-HllSSey Riddell 4 (1), second daughter of William 3 (1), was 
born at Nantucket, Mass., Aug. 2, 1803; was married to Samuel Coleman, 
and died in May, 1839. Mr. Coleman now (1874) lives in Boston. 

Frederick-Augustus Riddell 4 (1), fifth son of William 3 (1), was born 
at Nantucket, Mass., Aug. 26, 1804 ; a cooper by trade ; he was lost at sea, 
in the ship "Lady Adams," in the year 1823; unmarried. 

Susan-Coffin Riddell 4 (3), third daughter of William 3 (1), was born 
at Nantucket, Mass., March 30, 1806, and died when an infant. 

Lindsey- Adams Riddell 4 (2), sixth son of William 3 (1), was born at 
Nantucket, Mass., Jan. 30, 1807, and died an infant. 

Edward-Coffin Riddell 4 (1), seventh son of William 3 (1), was born 
at Nantucket, Mass., Oct. 13, 1808; died single, in 1844. 

George-Hussey Riddell 4 (3), eighth son of William 3 (1), was born at 
Nantucket, Mass., May 25, 1810; married Sept. 2, 1833, by Rev. Henry 
F. Edes, Eunice, daughter of Thomas and Eunice Barnard (she was born 
Oct. 14, 1815), and had issue seven children, of whom hereafter. Mr. 
Riddell was a clerk in a dry-goods store in Boston, from 1826 to 1832; 
was in the dry-goods business at Nantucket, from 1832 until 1836; resided 
in New York from that time until August, 1837, when returning to Nan- 
tucket, he re-established himself in the dry-goods trade. He closed up 
his business in Nantucket, and in 1849 left for California; moved his 
family to Benicia, in 1852 ; was elected Justice of the Peace in 1855, 
and was in that office in 1873. He was county recorder, from March, 
1864, to March, 1866. He has also held other positions of responsibility, 
and is an efficient, public-spirited gentleman. He is now resident at 
Benicia, Cal. 

Jethro-Hussey Riddell 4 (1), ninth son of William 3 (1), was born at 
Nantucket, Mass., July 21, 1812 ; died when an infant. 

Thomas Riddell 4 (2), tenth son of William 3 (1), was born at Nan- 
tucket, Mass., Oct. 25, 1813 ; died when an infant. 



Eliza Riddell 4 (2), eldest daughter of Thomas 3 (1), was born at Nan- 
tucket, Mass., April 23, 1808 ; married to Thomas R. Dix ; no more in- 
formation. 

Charlotte Riddell 4 (2), second daughter of Thomas 3 (1), was born at 
18 



274 BIDDELLS OF NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS. 

Nantucket, Mass., in January, 1812; married Samuel G. Stephenson, and 
died March 8, 1833. 

Georgiana Riddell 4 (1), third daughter of Thomas 3 (1), was born in 
New Bedford, Mass., and married. 



Harriet- Ann Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of John 3 (1), was born at 

Nantucket, Mass., Sept. 7, 1815 ; was married by Rev. Marcus, May 

7, 1839, to Albert, son of Zephaniah and Martha Wood. 

Capt. Valentine-S. Riddell 4 (1), eldest son of John 3 (1), was born 
at Nantucket, Mass., July 7, 1817 ; married in March, 1841, Lydia, daugh- 
ter of Elisha and Lucretia Swain (she was born May 12, 1820), and sec- 
ondly, widow Amey Smith, of Ohio. He was master of a whale-ship 
and a trader ; but now lives at Bruce Port, W. T. His first wife died 
Feb. 12, 1853. Mr. Riddell had three children by his first, and one by his 
second wife, of whom hereafter. 

Nancy-F. Riddell 4 (3), second daughter of John 3 (1), was born June 
5, 1822, and died unmarried, Sept. 18, 1838. 

Samuel-S. Riddell 4 (6), second son of John 3 (1), Avas born in Nan- 
tucket, Mass., March 10, 1828; married Dec. 20, 1858, by Rev. Francis 
LeBaron, Elizabeth, daughter of Daniel and Eliza Whitney. Mr. Riddell 
is a merchant, and formerly lived in Callao, Peru; he now (1874) resides 
at Jamaica Plain, Mass., and has a counting-room on State Street, in Bos- 
ton. They had four children, of whom hereafter. 

Thomas Riddell 4 (3), third son of John 3 (1), was born at Nantucket, 
Mass., April 13, 1833, and died unmarried in Washington Territory, Aug. 
31, 1868. 

John Riddell 4 (2), fourth son of John 3 (1), was born at Nantucket, 
Mass., March 13, 1836, and lives in Washington Territory; he has no 
family. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

Henry-G. Riddell 5 (2), eldest son of Joshua 4 (1), was born at Nan- 
tucket, Mass., June 3, 1812; married, July 9, 1837, Caroline Pinkham ; 

and secondly, Lucinda . His first wife was born in 1810, and died 

Oct. 5, 1867. He now lives in Montrose County, Mo., is a mechanic, and 
has one son, of whom hereafter. 

Sarah-C. Riddell 6 (2), eldest daughter of Joshua 4 (1), was born at 
Nantucket, Mass., March 6, 1817; married, July 19, 1835, by George Cobb, 
Justice of the Peace, William P., son of Owen Bunker. 

Caroline-G. Riddell 5 (1), second daughter of Joshua 4 (1), was born 
at Nantucket, Mass., March 2, 1821 ; married in 1839, Horace Young, of 
Maine; and secondly, Capt. William H., son of William H. Swain. 

George- Washington Riddell 5 (4), second son of Joshua 4 (1), was 
born at Nantucket, Mass., Sept. 24, 1824, and died unmarried, April 5, 
1844, aged 19 years. 

Robert-F. Riddell 5 (2), eldest son of William 4 (2), was born at Nan- 
tucket (supposed), and died Sept. 12, 1838, aged 2 years. 

Henry- W. Riddell 5 (3), second son of William 4 (2), was born at Nan- 
tucket (supposed), Sept. 28, 1839; resides in New York, unmarried. 

• 

Mary-P. Riddell 5 (3), eldest daughter of Benjamin 4 (3), was born at 
Nantucket, Mass., Jan. 30, 1834; married in 1860, George P., son of Mo- 
ses and Susan Smith. 



BIDDELLS OF NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS. 275 

Benjamin-Franklin Biddell 6 (3), eldest son of Benjamin 4 (2), was 
born at Nantucket, Mass., Aug. 22, 1846 ; now resident of Boston, where 
he keeps a drug-store. 

Henry Riddell 5 (4), second son of Benjamin 4 (2), was born at Nan- 
tucket, Mass., May 18, 1848. No other information. 

Alexander-C. Riddell 5 (2), third son of Benjamin 4 (2), was born in 
Nantucket, Mass., April 3, 1852, and resides in California. 



Tiniothy-W. Riddell 5 (2), eldest son of Timothy 4 (1), was born at 
Nantucket, Mass., May 5, 1831, and was lost at sea, when mate of the 
bark " Abby," of Kingston, Mass., while coming from Malaga, in 1856. 

James-Bai'tlett Riddell 5 (3), second son of Timothy 4 (1), was born 
in Nantucket, Mass., May 5, 1834, and died Feb. 18, 1836. 

Charlotte-C. Riddell 5 (3), eldest daughter of Timothy 4 (1), was born 
at Nantucket, Mass., Jan. 29, 1838, and died single, July 27, 1851. 

Mary-H. Riddell 5 (4), second daughter of Timothy 4 (1), was born at 
Nantucket, Mass., Sept. 11, 1839; married in November, 1864, Joseph P. 
Nye, of Fairhaven. 

Joseph-Chase Riddell 5 (1), third son of Timothy 4 (1), was born at 
Nantucket, Mass., July 22, 1841, and died in September, 1847, a child. 

Sarah-B. Riddell 5 (3), third daughter of Timothy 4 (1), was born at 
Nantucket, Mass., March 29, 1849, and died single, Jan. 27, 1873. 



Isaac-Sisson Riddell 5 (1), eldest son of Josiah 4 (1), was born at Nan- 
tucket, Mass., Jan. 7, 1815; married Harriet-Louisa Berry; is a painter 
by trade, living in Savannah, Ga. ; he has one son, of whom hereafter. 

William-H. Riddell 5 (4), second son of Josiah 4 (1), was born at Nan- 
tucket, Mass., Oct. 19, 1819. He was mate of a vessel, and was shot at 
sea, Jan. 28, 1849, and buried on an uninhabited island. 



Mary -P. Riddell 5 (5), eldest daughter of Charles 4 (2), was born at 

Nantucket, Mass., Jan. 26, 1827 ; married Parrisan. He was wounded 

at Antietam, and died Sept. 17, 1862. 

Emeline-A. Riddell 5 (1), second daughter of Charles 4 (2), was born 
at Nantucket, Mass., in 1829; married John Austin. They are both dead. 

Eliza-C. Riddell 5 (3), third daughter of Charles 4 (2), was born at 
Nantucket, Mass. (supposed), in 1830; married Allen Convey; no issue. 



Josephine Riddell 5 (1), fourth daughter of Charles 4 (2), was (prob- 
ably) born in New Yoi'k ; married Thomas Barry, and lives in Brooklyn. 

Hepsibah-L. Riddell 5 (1), fifth daughter of Charles 4 (2), was (prob- 
ably) born in New York; died young. 

Virginia Riddell 5 (1), sixth daughter of Charles 4 (2), was (probably) 
born in New York, and died Dec. 14, 1845, aged 5 years. 

DeWitt-C. Riddell 5 (1), a son of Charles 4 (2), died unmarried, in 
New York, at the age of 21, May 7, 1862. 

Frederick-A. Riddell 5 (2), a son of Charles 4 (2), was born Aug. 6, 
1834, and died single, in New York, May 3, 1859. 



Emma-Barnard Riddell 5 (1), eldest daughter of George 4 (3), was 
born at Nantucket, Mass., May 27, 1834; died at Benicia, Cal., unmar- 
ried, Nov. 11, 1852. 



276 BIDDELLS OF NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS. 

George-William Riddell 6 (5), eldesl son of George 4 (3), was (prob- 
ably) born in New York, March 5, 1837 ; married in San Francisco to 
Elizabeth Hall, Jan. 16, 187'2, and has issue. Mr. Riddell is a book-keeper 
and accountant in San Francisco, Cal. 

Thomas-Barnard Riddell 5 (4), bod of George 4 (3), horn April 21, 
1840; died May 15, 1840. 

Alexander Riddell"' (3), son of George 4 (3), born April 21, 1840; died 
May 17, 1840. 

Mary-Coffin Riddell 5 (5), second daughter of George 4 (3), was born 
at Nantucket, Mass., Sept. 13, 1841 ; married Lieut. James L. Corley, of 
Barnwell, S. C, at Bcnicia, Cal., June 3, 1861. They now (1873) reside 
at Norfolk, Va. 

Eliza-Starbnck Riddell 5 (3), third daughter of George 4 (3), was horn 
at Nantucket, Mass., July 20, 1845; married, Aug. 3, 1806, to Frank Bar- 
nard (her cousin), and resides at San Francisco, Cal. 

Henrietta-Herbert Riddell 5 (1), fourth daughter of George 4 (3), was 
born at Benicia, Cal., Dec. IS, 1855; was unmarried in 1873. She is a 
teacher. 



Elisabeth-S. Riddell 5 (1), eldest daughter of Valentine 4 (1), was horn 
at Nantucket, Mass., June 8, 1846. She is a teacher in the Coffin School 
at Nantucket. 

WiUiam-S. Riddell 5 (5), eldest son of Valentine 4 (1), was born at 
Nantucket, Mass., March 3, 1850; married, in June, 1872, Martha A. Bas- 
kernelle, in California, and has issue. 

Valentine Riddell 5 (2), second son of Valentine 4 (1), was born at 
Nantucket, Mass., Jan. 18, 1853, and died in California, unmarried, Jan. 
18, 1871. 

George-Washington Riddell 5 (6), third son of Valentine 4 (1), was 
born at Nantucket, Mass., about February, 1859, and was unmarried in 
1874. " 

Charles-Whitney Riddell 5 (3), eldest son of Samuel 4 (6), was born 
Aug. 16, 1860. 

Emma Riddell 5 (1), eldest daughter of Samuel 4 (6), was born Sent. 
17, 1864. 

Annie-Eliza Riddell 5 (1), second daughter of Samuel 4 (6), was born 
May 18, 1868. 

Herbert Riddell 5 (1), second son of Samuel 4 (6), was born June 2, 
1871. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

John-Backman Riddell 1 ' (3), a son of Isaac 5 (1), was born about 
1860, and lives in Savannah, Ga. 



George-Lindsey Riddell 6 (7), a son of George 5 (5), was born in San 
Francisco, Cal. 

Alice Riddell (1), a daughter of William 5 (5), was born in 1873. 



BIDDELLS OF MONSON, MASSACHUSETTS. 277 



RIDDELLS OF MONSON, MASSACHUSETTS. 

[Tvuone Branch.] 

Thomas Ridel 1 (1), or Riddell, born in County Tyrone, Ireland, in 
1739, was brought to New England when a child. He married Rebecca 
Moulton, of Monson, Mass., and had issue seven'- children, of whom here- 
after. He was a farmer. Some say he served in the Colonial Army dur- 
ing the war of the Revolution. I find no mention of him on the pension 
records at Washington, D. C. His surname, — with those of his children, 
— on the town records of Mdhson, is spelled "Ridel," hence 1 believe his 
real family name was "Riddell," and the contracted form an unauthor- 
ized assumption of some scribe. I have not found a family tradition 
amongst the descendants of Thomas Ridel by which the connection be- 
tween him and any other American branch is assumed, or even suggested; 
the prevailing traits, however, so conspicuous in all branches of the old 
clan, are singularly prominent in this family, and they are undoubtedly of 
the same extraction as the numerous other Scotch-Irish branches in the 
United States. Mr. Ridel died in Monson, Mass., in 1809, aged 70 years.* 

SECOND GENERATION. 

John Riddle' 2 (1), eldest son of Thomas 1 (1), was born in Monson, 
Mass., in the year 1761 ; married to Olive, daughter of Joshua Blodget, 
of Stafford, M-ase., and settled in Randolph, Vt. He emigrated to Alex- 
ander, Genesee County, N. Y., in 1806 or 1807, and was, consequently, 
one of the pioneers on the well-known " Holland Purchase." He was a 
farmer by vocation, but served as Justice of the Peace for many years, 
and also represented his town as a supervisor for several years. Mr. Rid- 
dle died in 1849, aged 88 years; had issue ten children, of whom here- 
after. He was reliable and straightforward; a man of honor and high 
respectability. 

Joseph Riddle 2 (1), second son of Thomas 1 (1), was born at Monson, 
Mass. (according to Pension Records at Washington), in the year 1763 ; 

married to Mary or Polly , and had issue eight children, of whom 

hereafter. He resided in Monson until 1808, when he emigrated to the 
"Holland Purchase," in the State of New York, and settled as a farmer; 
here he lived the remainder of his days. In the summer of 1775 he en- 
listed under Capt. Isaac Cotton, in Col. David Brewster's regiment. In 
1776 he enlisted under Capt. Joseph Munger, in the regiment of Col. Rob- 
ert I. Woodbridge, "Massachusetts Line." July 1, 1777, he entered the 
service for three years under Capt. Caleb Keep, and Col. William Shep- 
herd, of the Fourth Massachusetts Regiment, General Glover's brigade, 
as drum-major; and in July, 1780, was discharged by Capt. Simon Lar- 
ned, who was in command of the regiment at " Robertson Farms " near 
West Point. He was on a short tour in the militia, and at the surrender 
of Burgoyne, but was not in the decisive battle preceding that event, in 
consequence of guarding the road to Albany. He was in the battle of 
Monmouth, N. J., June 28, 1778, and with General Sullivan, in Rhode 
Island, in August, 1778. He was probably wounded, for the Pension Rec- 
ords state that he was a cripple. Some say he did service in the war of 
1812. I do not know the date of his death. 

* There are traditions in other families whose Scotch-Irish ancestors settled in 
the Middle States, that there were relatives in New England. 



278 RIDDELLS OF MONSON, MASSACHUSETTS. 

Elijah Riddle 2 (1), third son of Thomas 1 (1) and his wife Rebecca, 
was born in Monson, Mass., Jan. 27, 177*2 ; married to Clarissa Fuller 
(she was born Jan. 20, 1775, died Sept. 6, 1834), and early emigrated to 
New York State, and took up land on the "Holland Purchase," along 
with his brothers before mentioned. He left New York and emigrated 
West many years ago; died in Michigan, Oct. 10, 1842, having had issue 
four children, of whom hereafter. He was in the war of the Revolution, 
and fought in several engagements ; also, on board a man-of-war three 
years. 

Thomas Riddle 2 (2), fourth son of Thomas 1 (1), was born in Monson, 
Mass., Sept. 27, 1781 ; married to Minerva Merrick (she was born in 
Monson, Mass., Feb. 3, 1785), Dec. 22, 1805, and emigrated to Ohio early 
in the summer of 1817. He was a farmer; died at Newbury, Geauga 
County, O., in September, 1823, having had issue eight children, of whom 
hereafter. His widow died at Paw Paw, Ind., Jan. 11, 1866. She was a 
woman of remarkable intellectual powers, an excellent wife and mother. 

Mary Riddle 2 (1), a daughter of Thomas 1 (1) (born probably in Mon- 
son, Mass., though I find no records), was married to Benjamin Blodget, 
of Randolph, Vt. ; probably died there many years ago. 

Susan Riddle 2 (1), a daughter of Thomas 1 (1), was born (probably in 
Monson, Mass.; no records) between 1772 and 1773; was married to John 
Squires, a farmer, and died in Alexander, N. Y*., sixty years ago. 

Salla Riddle 2 (1), fifth son of Thomas 1 (1) and Rebecca, his wife, 
was born in Monson, Mass., Feb. 16, 1774. I have found no other account 
of him, and presume he died when a child. 

Sally Riddle 2 (1), a daughter of Thomas 1 (1), was born in Monson, 
Mass., Feb. 16, 1778; was married to Levi Patterson, a farmer, and died 
in Orangeville, N. Y. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Lyman Riddle 8 (1), eldest son of John 2 (1), was born in Monson, 
Mass., in 1786; married Jan. 23, 1818, to Polly, daughter of Royal Moul- 
ton, and had issue six children, of whom hereafter. He was a farmer ; 
died on his father's homestead in Alexander, Genesee County, N. Y., April 
9, 1872, aged 84 years. 

Hannah Riddle 3 (1), eldest daughter of John' 2 (1), was born at Mon- 
son, Mass., in 1788; died in the town of Alexander, N. Y., in 1808, un- 
married. 

Sarah Riddle 8 (1), second daughter of John 2 (1), was born in Mon- 
son, Mass., in 1790; died in the town of Alexander, N. Y., in 1847. 

Susan Riddle 8 (2), third daughter of John 2 (1), was born at Monson, 
Mass., in 1794; was married to Marshall Butterfield, and resides in Mich- 



igan. 



Olive Riddle 8 (1), fourth daughter of John 2 (1), was born at Monson, 
Mass., in 1790; married Leverett Seward, and resides in Alexander, N. Y. 

Betsey Riddle 8 (1), fifth daughter of John 2 (1), was born in Ran- 
dolph, Vt., in 1799; was married to Harley Howe, and resides in Roches- 
ter, X. Y. 

John Riddle 8 (2), second son of John 2 (1), was born in Randolph, Vt., 
in 1802 ; died at Alexander, Genesee County, N. Y., in July, 1827. 

Thomas Riddle 8 (3), third son of John 2 (1), was born in Randolph, 
Vt., in 1804; married, in 1834, to Eloise A. Johnson, of LeRoy, N. Y. ; 
resides in the town of Darien, Genesee County, N. Y., and is without 



RIDDELLS OF MONSON, MASSACHUSETTS. 279 

issue. Mr. Riddle followed mercantile pursuits in his early days ; has 
been postmaster, town-clerk, register of deeds, session justice, and Justice 
of the Peace for twenty-eight consecutive years. 

Norman Riddle 3 (1), fourth son of John 2 (1), was born in Alexander, 
N. Y., in 1806; died there in 1810. 

Hannah Riddle 3 (2), sixth daughter of John' 2 (1), was born in Alex- 
ander, N. Y., in 1808; died there in 1812. 

Salla Riddle 3 (2), eldest son of Elijah 2 (1), was born March 28, 1803, 
in Monson, Mass., and died Feb. 17, 1803, aged 60 years. He married 
Olive Nelson, March 27, 1825, and had issue seven children, two sons and 
five daughters, of whom hereafter. 

James-M. Riddle 3 (1), second son of Elijah 2 (1), was born April 23, 
1810 (probably in Monson, Mass.), but I fail to learn particulars of his 
family. 

Harriet Riddle 3 (1), daughter of Elijah 2 (1), was born March 11, 
1813, probably in Monson. 

Laura Riddle 3 (1), daughter of Elijah 2 (1), was born July 7, 1819, 
(probably in New York) ; married to Edwin Bennet. 



Orrill Riddle 3 (1), eldest son of Joseph 2 (1), was born in Monson, 
Mass., May 18, 1790; married Bertha Chaffe, and by her had issue four 
children. He married, secondly, Harriet , by whom he had four chil- 
dren. He settled in Genesee County, N. Y., as a farmer, where he died. 
Wives both dead. For account of descendants see following pages. 

Freeboril-Moiilton Riddle 3 (1), second son of Joseph 2 Jl), was born 
in Monson, Mass., Sept. 18, 1793; married to Abigail Chaffe, of Alexan- 
der, N. Y., and by her (who died March 15, 1829) had eight children. 
He married, secondly, Sarah Smith, of Batavia, Genesee County, N. Y., 
by whom he had three children; thirdly, to Jemima Baston, by whom no 
issue. He was a farmer; died March 12, 1877; his wife predeceased him 
in the summer of 1874. 

Rebecca Riddle 3 (1), eldest daughter of Joseph 2 (1), was born in 
Monson, Mass., March 10, 1782 ; was married to Thomas Broadway, and 
had issue. Dead. 

Polly Riddle 3 (1), second daughter of Joseph 2 (1), was born in Mon- 
son, Mass., Aug. 1, 1784 ; was married to Daniel Moulton, and had issue. 
Dead. 

Lina Riddle 3 (1), third daughter of Joseph 2 (1), was born in Monson, 
Mass., June 1, 1786; was married to Maturin Allard, and had issue. Dead. 

Charlotte Riddle 3 (1), fourth daughter of Joseph 2 (1), was born in 
Monson, Mass., June 8, 1788; was married to James McKain ; died in 
New York State. 

Almon Riddle 3 (1), eldest son of Thomas 2 (2), was born in Monson, 
Hampden County, Mass., Nov. 3, 1806; went to the "Western Reserve," 
Ohio, with his parents in the month of September, 1817, and settled in 
Newbury, Geauga County. He learned the carpenter's trade with one Joel 
Chapman. Purchased sixteen acres of wild land on Paw Paw Creek, Wa- 
bash County, Ind.; married Caroline-Olivia Marsh, of Springfield, Mass., 
Aug. 1, 1837, and moved to Noble township, Wabash County, Ind., and 
settled on the land he had previously purchased, in October, 1838. He 
had issue three children, of whom hereafter. 



280 RIDDELLS OF MONSON, MASSACHUSETTS. 

Jose-Merriek Riddle 3 (1), second son of Thomas 2 (2), was born in 
Monson, Mass., July 27, 1808; married, Feb. 23, 1836, to Caroline Hay- 
den, and by her had several children, of whom hereafter. He removed to 
Thetford, Genesee County, Mich., in 1849, and died there Aug. 9, 1855, — 
" a superior man." 

Thomas-Elmer Kiddle 3 (4), third son of Thomas 2 (2), was born in 
Monson, Mass., Aug. 4, 1810; died there March 26, 1813. 

William-Henry Riddle 3 (1), fourth son of Thomas 2 (2), was born in 
Monson, Mass., April 13, 1812; went to Ohio with his parents, and be- 
came a young lawyer of great promise; he died at Plainville, Hamilton 
County, O., June 6, 1837, unmarried. He was the "Henry Ridgeley" in 
the novel written by his brother, Albert G. Riddle, of Washington, ami 
published by Nichols & Hall, of Boston, a few years ago ; it was entitled 
" Bart Ridgeley." 

Johll-Adams Riddle 3 (3), fifth son of Thomas 2 (2), was born in Mon- 
son, Hampden County, Mass., April 23, 1814; married, in October, 1837, 
to Lois Odell, of Manchester, Vt., and had issue. He married, secondly, 
Theressa Ganson ; she was born in Massachusetts, and died at Chardon, 
O. ; no issue. Mr. Riddle is now living with his youngest daughter ; a 
carpenter. 

Hon. Albert-Gallatin Riddle 3 (1), sixth son of Thomas 2 (2), was 
born in Monson, Mass., May 28, 1816; married, Jan. 23, 1845, to Car- 
oline, daughter of Judge Burton F. Avery, of Chardon, O., where he 
resided until 1850. After the death of his father, Mr. Riddle cared for 
himself, and has said, "I did it poorly." He studied law and was admit- 
ted to the bar in 1841; was elected district attorney, and served six years; 
was elected twice to the Ohio State Legislature ; removed to Cleveland in 
1850; elected to Congress in 1860; went to Cuba as United States Con- 
sul, in 1864, and to look after government interests at Nassau. On his 
return, he removed to Washington, and resumed the practice of law. 
where he still continues, having acquired an extensive patronage, and is 
employed on cases involving great responsibility. He is Professor of 
Law in the Howard University. He contributed his portrait in steel for 
this work, and is one of the Publishing: Committee appointed at the fam- 
ily meeting at Philadelphia, in 1876. Mr. Riddle has issue seven children, 
of whom hereafter. He is the author of several popular novels. 

Minerva Riddle 3 (1), eldest daughter of Thomas 2 (2), born at New- 
bury, O., April 16, 1818; was married Jan. 24, 1839, to Varnum N. 
Clark, and in 1842 or '43, moved to Paw Paw, Ind. She has issue four 
children. 

Roswell Riddle 3 (1), seventh son of Thomas 2 (2), was born at New- 
bury, O., Dec. 4, 1820; married Romelia Smith; secondly, to Alvira 
Way, a widow. He served in the war of the Rebellion ; has lived on the 
homestead. No children. 

George-W. Riddle 3 (1), eighth son of Thomas 2 (2), was born at New- 
bury, O., April 26, 1823; died at Paw Paw, Ind., March 23, 1843, — "as 
handsome and noble a youth as ever bore the name." 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Pallas-Lontta Riddle 4 (1), eldest daughter of Lyman 3 (1) and Polly 
(Moulton), his wife, was born at Alexander, (xenesee County, N. Y., Oct. 
26, 1818 ; was married to John Dirstine, March 17, 1842, ami resides at 
Alexander. 



RID DELLS OF MO X SON, MASSACHUSETTS. 281 

Grace- Anil Riddle 4 (1), second daughter of Lyman 3 (1), was born at 
Alexander, N. Y., in October, 1822; was married to Royal Newland, in 
January, 1843, and died at Alexander, Sept. 13, 1844. 

Jerome Riddle 4 (1), eldest son of Lyman 3 (1), was born at Alexan- 
der, Genesee County, N. Y., April 30, 1825; married to Adell Wright, in 
1875. No children in 1878. 

Elizabeth- Adell Riddle 4 (1), third daughter of Lyman 3 (1), was born 
at Alexander, N. Y., June 25, 1832 ; married to William W. Plato, Oct. 
15, 1857 ; resides in Batavia, Genesee County, N. Y. 

Thomas-Herbert Riddle 4 (5), second son of Lyman 3 (1), was born 
at Alexander, Genesee County, N. Y., June 3, 1839 ; married in February, 
1862, to Elvira Blodget, and has issue, of whom hereafter. Resides at 
Alexander. 

Albert Riddle 4 (2), eldest son of Salla 3 (1), was born in the town of 
Alexander, Genesee County, N. Y., Dec. 13,1828; married Nov. 13, 1851, 
to Eliza J. Holt, and has had issue five children, of whom hereafter. Mr. 
Riddle has been a farmer, druggist, and engaged in the grocery business; 
has held every office in the township except that of constable; was twice 
elected county treasurer, and is now (1879) superintendent of the county 
poor. He resides in Howell, Livingstone County, Mich. His height is 
six feet three inches ; his weight two hundred and sixty-five pounds. 
Mr. Riddle, judging from his portrait, is a fine-looking man. 

Arvilla Riddle 4 (1), eldest daughter of Salla 4 (1), was born Dec. 3, 
1826; was married May 25, 1845, to Riley Kinney, and died June 20, 1866, 

Jaiiett Riddle 4 (if second daughter of Salla 3 (1), was born April 14, 
1831 ; was married Feb. 22, 1854, to Aaron V. Holt. 

Alma-S. Riddle 4 (1), third daughter of Salla 3 (1), was born Sept. 22, 
1833; was married Dec. 22, 1858, to John G. Rooke. 

Llicias-E. Riddle 4 (1), second son of Salla 3 (1), was born in Alexan- 
der, Genesee County, N. Y., Aug. 20, 1834; married Dec. 14, 1859, to 
Betsey, daughter of Henry and Lauretta Elliatte (or Elliott), of Piety 
Hill, Livingstone County, Mich., — he was born in Canandaigua, Ontario 
County, N. Y., Jan. 8, 1833, — and has issue three children, of whom 
hereafter. Mr. Riddle is a farmer in good circumstances, and has held 
various township offices. He resides at Oceola, Mich. 

Caroline Riddle 4 (1~ 

Almira Riddle 4 (1). I Children of 0r rin« (1). 
Lyman Riddle 4 (2). f v ' 

•Charles Riddle 4 (1). J 



Josepll-Montraville Riddle 4 (2), eldest son of Freeborn 3 (1), was 
born at Alexander, Genesee County, N. Y., June 5, 1814; married Oct. 
15, 1840, to Lucy, daughter of Asa and Lucy (Bushnell) Andrus, of 
Pollet, Rutland County, Vt. (she was born June 5, 1815), and by her 
had issue five children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddle is a farmer, resid- 
ing at Salamanca, N. Y. 

George-Kirklill Riddle 4 (2), second son of Freeborn 3  (1), was born 
at Alexander, Genesee County, N. Y., Oct. 6, 1816; married in the vil- 
lage of Batavia, same county, April 1, 1838, to Maryette Wade (she was 
born in Vermont, in 1816). He settled in Batavia, Genesee County, N. 
Y. ; worked as a mechanic ; removed to Cattaraugus and engaged in 



282 BTDDELLS OF MONSON, MASSACHUSETTS. 

farming; thence to Pembroke, and carried on a farm ; thence to Pemble- 
ton as a mechanic; thence to Greenbush, Mich. (Clinton County), where 
he now resides. He has issue eleven children, of whom hereafter. 

Laura-Utley Riddle 4 (2), eldest daughter of Freeborn 3 (1), was born 
at Alexander, Genesee County, N. Y.; married to Pliny Fox, a lawyer, 
and lives at DeKalb, 111. 

Charlotta-Temple Riddle 4 (2), second daughter of Freeborn 3 (1), 
was born at Batavia, Genesee County, N. Y. ; married to Augustus Ma- 
son, of Salamanca, N. Y., and has issue. 

Rosalvo-King Riddle 4 (1), third son of Freeborn 3 (1), was born at 
Batavia, Genesee County, N. Y., and is now living at Independence, Van 
Buren County, Ind. ; is a merchant. He married Mary Wheeler, and has 
issue, of whom hereafter. 

Trumlmll-Cary Riddle 4 (1), fourth son of Freeborn 3 (1), was born at 
Batavia, Genesee County, N. Y., Aug. 12, 1823 ; removed to Lockport, N. 
Y., at the age of 15 ; married Aug. 22, 1847, to Sarah-Margaret Colt; was 
superintendent of canal work on Erie Canal several years ; removed to 
Grinned, Poweshiek County, la., in 1856. In 1859 moved to Chapin, 
Franklin County, la. He was one of the early settlers in both counties, 
and suffered many hardships ; his nearest market was sixty-four miles 
away. He died respected, Jan. 24, 1877. 

Marquis-de-Lafayette Riddle 4 (1), fifth son of Freeborn 3 (1), was 
born at Batavia, Genesee County, N. Y. ; married Sarah Clickner, 1848; 
secondly, Emily Utley, in 1878, and resides at Royalton, Niagara County, 
N. Y., as a farmer. 

James-Sllllivail Riddle 4 (2), sixth son of Freeborn 3 (1), was born at 
Batavia, Genesee County, N. Y.; married Fluvia A. Herrighton in 1846, 
and is now farming at Chapin, Franklin County, la. 

Abigail Riddle 4 (1), third daughter of Freeborn 3 (1), was born at 
Alexander, Genesee County, N. Y. ; married to Morris Butterfield, a mer- 
chant of Otto, Cattaraugus County, N. Y. She died in March, 1864. 

Emily-Sophia Riddle 4 (1), second daughter of Freeborn 3 (1), by his 
secoud wife, was born at Alexander, Genesee County, N. Y. ; was married 
to Sheltersburg, and resides in Girard, Penn. 

Fraiiklin-Carlos Riddle 4 (1), son of Freeborn 8 (1), by his second 
wife, was born at Alexander, N. Y. ; married to Emma Jenkins, and died 
in October, 1861. 

Francis-Marian Riddle 4 (1), eldest son of Almon 8 (1), was born in 
Wabash County, Ind., July 3, 1839; married Aug. 14, 1862, to An- 
nette M. Stewart, and has issue five children, of whom hereafter, fie 
learned the carpenter's trade of his father. Attended school winters 
until twenty years old. Was a school-teacher. Cast his first vote for 
President Abraham Lincoln, in the autumn of 1860; in the following 
spring, while working at his trade for money to take him to college, he 
heard of the firing on Fort Sumter, and of the call of President Lincoln 
for volunteers to put down the Rebellion ; patriotism predominating over 
every other sentiment, he responded at once to the call by enlisting in 
Company H, Eighth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, as a private; 
was appointed first corporal in May, and was with his regiment at the 
battle of Rich Mountain, Ya., July 11, 1861, after which, — Aug. 6, 1861, 
— was honorably discharged. He was offered a commission at the re- 
organization of the Eighth Regiment for three years, but declined doing 



BIDDELLS OF MONSON, MASSACHUSETTS. 283 

more infantry service. He re-enlisted, in the Third Indiana Battery, 
Aug. 11, 1862, to serve three years ; was married on the 14th of the 
same month, and went immediately to Missouri to serve under General 
Curtis. In November, 1863, his battery was sent to Tennessee to serve 
with Gen. A. J. Smith against General Forrest; after two months of 
very severe winter campaign here, the battery was ordered to Vicksburg, 
to join General Sherman in a great raid on the Mobile* & Ohio Railroad, 
at Meridian, Miss.; returning, his battery embarked for Red River, to 
assist General Banks in the capture of Shreveport; was engaged in the 
battles at Fort De Russey, Pleasant Hill, Yellow Bayou, and several 
skirmishes; returned to Memphis in July, 1864, and with Gen. A. J. 
Smith retrieved the losses of Sturgis, at Guntown, in the battle of Lupello, 
July 14th, and two days later at the battle of " Old Town Creek." In Sep- 
tember he went to Missouri, under General Smith, to assist in repelling 
the Price invasion. Assisted General Thomas at Nashville, Dec. 15th and 
16th, in the overthrow of General Hood. In February, 1865, went to 
New Orleans to assist General Canby in the reduction of Mobile; Avas 
engaged in the siege of Fort Spanish, April 1st to 13th, 1865, and en- 
gaged in the storming of Fort Blakely, Alabama, late in the evening of 
April 9, 1865, the very last battle of the war. Although he was most of 
the time on detached service as provost marshal's and adjutant-general's 
clerk, he never missed an opportunity to stand with his comrades on the 
bloody field. He returned to his. home, and to his wife, who had not 
seen him since the wedding night, — Aug. 14, 1862. He followed the occu- 
pation of a farmer for five years. In 1870 he and his family left Indiana 
for Washington County, Kan., where he purchased three hundred and 
twenty acres of land, which he cultivated till 1874, when he purchased 
property in the city of Blue Rapids, Marshall County, Kan., in which city 
he has since lived, devoting most of his time in teaching; and is now 
recognized as a leading educator in Marshall County, one of the most 
enterprising in the State. Mr. Riddle is a man of fine personal appearance. 

Almaria-Melinda Kiddle 4 (1), eldest daughter of Almon 3 (1), was 
born in Wabash County, Ind., July 3, 1841; married Sept. 3, 1871, to 
Charles-Frederick Hetmonsperger (German), and lives on her father's 
farm. 

DarillS-Almon Kiddle" (1), second son of Almon 3 (1),^ was born in 
Wabash County, Ind., June 2, 1843. In June, 1862, he enlisted in Com- 
pany F, Sixteenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry; was at the bat- 
tle of Richmond, Ky., Haines' Bluff, Miss., and Arkansas Post, in Arkansas. 
He died of typhoid pneumonia, at Point Pleasant on the Mississippi River, 
April 8, 1863. A brave soldier and promising young man. 



Elmer Riddle 4 (1), eldest son of Jose 3 (1) and his wife, Caroline 
Hayden, was born at Newbury, Geauga County, O., Jan. 10, 1837 ; learned 
the carpenters' trade, and moved with his parents to Thetford, Mich., in 
1845. He returned to Ohio in 1858, and married, Feb. 6, 1862, to Laura 

* While Mr. Riddle was engaged in the siege of Mobile, during the late war, he 
was one day strolling about Dauphine Island, near Fort Gains, where his depart- 
ment was stationed, when he was suddenly brought face to face with a most beau- 
tiful monument of white marble. He read the inscription, which was as follows : 
" Tn memory of Francis M. Riddle, First Confederate Regiment, Georgia Cavalry," 
— his own name in full. This singular incident deeply impressed Mr. Riddle at the 
time, and he still looks back to it as something remarkably strange. 



284 RIDDELLS OF MONSON, MASSACHUSETTS. 

Robinson, by whom he has two daughters, of whom hereafter. He car- 
ried on a farm for ten years in Newbury, O. ; is now (1879) engaged in 
the lumber and coal business at Chardon, O., where he resides. 

Frances-Catherine Riddle 4 (2), eldest daughter of Jose 8 (1) and 
Caroline, was born at Newbury, Geauga County, O., May 4, 1838 ; was 
married to Philo Stafford, Oct. 4, 1857, and is resident at Zilwaukee, Sag- 
inaw County, Mich. Five children. Mr. Stafford is foreman in a lumber- 
mill, and of salt-works. 

ThomaS-Corwin Riddle 4 (6), second son of Jose 8 (1) and his wife 
Caroline, was born at Newbury, Geauga County, O., Aug. 17, 1840, and 
went with his parents to Michigan, when five years old. He enlisted in 
the Union army at the first call for volunteers, June 2, 1861, and was 
marched three thousand miles. He was in the battles of Blue Gap, Win- 
chester, Port Republic, and Cedar Mountain, where he was wounded. 
He was absent on a furlough for a short time (the only time he was at 
home during the war), and after returning to his regiment he was engaged 
in the battles of Dumfries, Fredericksburgh, Chancellorsville, Gettysburgh, 
Falling water, Lookout Mountain, Mission Ridge, Taylor Ridge, Rocky- 
face, Dalton, Rome, Kingston Bridges, and many skirmishes. His regi- 
ment, — the Seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry, — " had as bloody a record 
as any in the army." He was married to Antonetta Bartholomew soon 
after returning from the war, and is now living on a farm in Thetford, 
Mich. 

Laura-Elizabeth Riddle 4 (3), second daughter of Jose 8 (1) and Caro- 
line, his wife, was born at Thetford, Genesee County, Mich., May 13, 
1848, and was a school-teacher for many years ; married in December, 
1878, to Jacob White, and resides at Thetford, on a farm. 

Charles-Mortimer Riddle 4 (2), third son of Jose 8 (1), and his wife 
Caroline, was born at Thetford, Mich., Nov. 17, 1850; is an oil producer 
at St. Joseph, Penn.; unmarried. 

Maria Riddle 4 (1), third daughter of Jose 3 (1) and Caroline, was 
born at Thetford, Genesee County, Mich., April 10, 1853 ; married to 
Leonard Brown, a farmer, in May, 1876. These reside at Thetford, and 
have one child. 

Eleanor Riddle 4 (1), fourth daughter of Jose 3 (1) and his wife Car- 
oline, was born at Thetford, Mich., April 11, 1855 ; was married to Rich- 
ard Wood, in September, 1873, and resides at Keokuck, 111. Mr. Wood 
is a school-teacher. One child. 



Clarence-C. Riddle 4 (1), a son of John 3 (3), was born at Newbury, 
O., Sept. 26, 1840 ; married Helen R. Ganson, at Cleveland, O., Feb. 21, 
1864, and has two children, of whom hereafter. His wife was born at 
Haverhill, N. H., Feb. 17, 1841. Mr. Riddell is a carpenter by trade. 
He was a gallant soldier during the war of the Rebellion, in an Ohio bat- 
tery; was a sergeant, and on the second day of the battle of Stone River, 
distinguished himself for bravery. 

Flora-E. Riddle 4 (1), eldest daughter of John 3 (3), was born at 
Newbury, O., April 25, 1847, and died at Russell, Dec. 2, 1853. 

Harriet-J. Riddle 4 (2), second daughter of John 3 (3), was born at 
Newbury, O., April 4, 1849; was married to Leander S. Drew, at Okee, 
Wis., March 15, 1866, and has two children. Mr. Drew was born at Dor- 
chester, Vt., Aug. 23, 1842. Resides at Okee, Wis. 



HIDDELLS OF MONSOtf, MASSACHUSETTS. 285 

Florence Riddle 4 (1), eldest daughter of Albert 8 (1), was born at 
Chardon, O., Nov. 9, 1845 ; was married Jan. 29, 1866, to Frank Bart- 
lett, and resides at Washington, D. C. 

Mary -Avery Riddle 4 (2), second daughter of Albert 3 (1), was born at 
Chardon, O., Sept. 17, 1847 ; unmarried in 1873. Living at home in 
Washington, D. C. 

Caroline-Minerva Riddle 4 (2), third daughter of Albert 3 (1), was 
born at Cleveland, O., Jan. 22, 1850 ; was married to Edwai-d Foster, and 
has children. She lives in Washington, D. C. 

Frederick-Albert Riddle 4 (1), eldest son of Albert 3 (1), was born in 
Cleveland, O., Aug. 22, 1852, and died May 27, 1856. 

Harriet-Williams Riddle 4 (3), fourth daughter of Albert 3 (1), was 
born at Cleveland, O., in October, 1854. At home in 1873. 

Albert-Thomas Riddle 4 (3), second son of Albert 3 (1), was born at 
Cleveland, O., May 2, 1858; at home in 1873. 

Alice Riddle 4 (1), fifth daughter of Albert 3 (1), was born in Cleve- 
land, O., Dec. 3, 1860 ; at home in 1873. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

Grace-Allll Riddle 5 (2), eldest daughter of Thomas 4 (5), was born in 
Alexander, N. Y., July 10, 1865. 

Allail-J. Riddle 5 (1), eldest son of Thomas 4 (5), was born in Alex- 
ander, N. Y., Feb. 10, 1867. 

Walter-(x. Riddle 5 (1), second son of Thomas 4 (5), was born in Alex- 
ander, N. Y., Jan. 12, 1872. 



Frailk-D. Riddle 5 (2), eldest son of Albert 4 (2), was born Nov. 12, 
1856; married, Feb. 27, 1878, to Effie Wisnean. He is in the drug busi- 
ness at Howell, Mich. 

Wells-B. Riddle 5 (1), second son of Albert 4 (2), was born Sept. 9, 
1860, and died when only three years old. 

Albert-S. Riddle 5 (4), third son of Albert 4 (2), was born Jan. 9, 1864, 
and is now living at home. 

Estelle-J. Riddle 5 (1), eldest daughter of Albert 4 (2), was born Sept. 

I, 1852; was married Oct. 30, 1870, to Orrin H. Winegan, and died Feb. 

II, 1872, without issue. 

Elvira-J. Riddle 5 (1), second daughter of Albert 4 (2), was born Aug. 
24, 1854; was married Jan. 19, 1876, to G. Dwight Wood, and has one 
daughter. 

Nettie-M. Riddle 5 (1), eldest daughter of Lucius 4 (1), was born in 
Oceola, Mich., Dec. 12, 1865. 

Jeilllie-M. Riddle 5 (1), second daughter of Lucius 4 (1), was born in 
Oceola, Mich., Dec. 21, 1868; died March 17, 1869. 

Cora-M. Riddle 5 (1), third daughter of Lucius 4 (1), was born in Oce- 
ola, Mich., Feb. 2, 1871. 

Lucy-E. Riddle 5 (1), eldest daughter of Joseph 4 (2), was born in Otto, 
Cattaraugus County, N. Y., June 25, 1841 ; was married to Rev. Samuel 
Cullen, and has three children. 

Clark-M. Riddle 5 (1), eldest son of Joseph 4 (2), was born in Otto, 
Cattaraugus County, N. Y., March 16, 1843 ; married Elizabeth Cullen, 
and has two children, of whom hereafter. 



286 BIDDELLS OF MO.YS'OX, MASSACHUSETTS. 

Charles Riddle 5 (3), second son of Joseph 4 (2), was born in Otto, 
Cattaraugus County, N. Y., Dec. 19, 1848 ; married to Lodena Cybrouff (?), 
and has issue one child. 

Chariot te-A. Riddle'' (3), second daughter of Joseph 4 (2), was born 
in Clarence, Erie County, X. Y., in 1852; was married to Lorenzo Curtis, 
and has a family. 

James-S. Riddle 5 (3), third son of Joseph 4 (2), was born in the town 
of Lockport, X. Y., Jan. 20, 1859; married March 12, 1883, Elece (or Elcie) 
Flow. One child in 1884. 



fltary-E. Riddle 5 (3), eldest daughter of George 4 (2), was born in 
Otto, Cattaraugus County, N. Y., June 21, 1839; unmarried. 

Slisail-A. Riddle 5 (3), second daughter of George 4 (2), was born in 
Otto, Cattaraugus County, X. Y., June 4, 1841 ; Avas married to Wesley 
Moore, of Pembroke, N.'Y., in 1862. 

Zorall-A. Riddle 5 (1), third daughter of George 4 (2), was born in 
Pembroke, Genesee County, N. Y., Dec. 7, 1847 ; was married to William 
J. Havens, of Essex, Clinton County, Mich. 

Aliee-M. Riddle 5 (2), fourth daughter of George 4 (2), was born in Pem- 
broke, Genesee County, X. Y., Aug. 6, 1848 ; was married to Peter Fle- 
agle, in Clinton County, Mich. 

Charles-M. Riddle 5 (4), eldest son of George 4 (2), was born in Gene- 
see County, X. Y., Aug. 25, 1851 ; married to Crouls, of Canada, and 

has one son, of whom hereafter. 

George-F. Riddle 5 (3), second son of George 4 (2), was born in Pem- 
broke, Genesee County, X. Y., Feb. 4, 1«53; died Oct. 22, 1854. 

Williaill-F. Riddle 5 (2), third son of George 4 (2), was born in Pen- 
dleton, Xiagara County, X. Y., Jan. 18, 1855 ; a farmer. 

Elleil-E. Riddle 5 (1), fifth daughter of George 4 (2), was born in 
Greenbush, Mich., March 1, 1857; was married to Hugh Anderson, a na- 
tive of Canada, Dec. 25, 1877 (?). 

George-K. Riddle 5 (4), fourth son of George 4 (2), was born in Green- 
bush, Mich., Oct. 8, 1859; died Jan. 6, 1863. 

Frailk-D. Riddle 5 (1), fifth son of George 4 (2), was born in Green- 
bush, Mich., May 19, 1862 ; a farmer. 

Eliza-Ma v Riddle 5 (1), sixth daughter of George 4 (2), was born in 
Greenbush, Mich., Xov. 11, 1864; died Oct. 6, 1867. 

Rohert-K. Riddle 5 (1), seventh son of George 4 (2), was born in Green- 
bush, Mich., Sept. 10, 1870. 



Sarah-Jane Riddle 5 (2), eldest daughter of Trumbull 4 (1), was born 
at Lockport, X. Y., Aug. 6, 1848, and died April 11, 1851. 

Ida-Elizaheth Riddle 5 (1), second daughter of Trumbull 4 (1), was 
born in Lockport, X. Y., July 22, 1849, and died April 13, 1851. 

Idell-Charlotte Riddle 5 (1), third daughter of Trumbull 4 (1), was born 
at Lockport, X. Y., Aug. 5, 1850; was married July 3, 1872. 

Herhert-Cary Riddle 5 (1), eldest son of Trumbull 4 (1), was born at 
Lockport, X. Y.* Dec. 10, 1852; died Dec. 20, 1852. 

Ida-Elizaheth Riddle 5 (2), fourth daughter of Trumbull 4 (1), was born 
in Lockport, X. Y., Dec. 10, 1853; was married Oct. 4, 1873. 

Ada-Janet Riddle 5 (1). fifth daughter of Trumbull 4 (1), was born at 
Lockport, X. Y., July 22, 1855; was married Aug. 25, 1873. 

Hermail-Cary Riddle 5 (1), second son of Trumbull 4 (1), was born at 



RIDDELL8 OF ALEXANDER, NEW YORK. 287 

Grinnell, la., March 25, 1857 ; married Aug. 12, 1876, to Mary Drake, and 
has txoo children, of whom hereafter. He is a farmer at Chapin, 111. 

William-Avery Riddle 5 (3), third son of Trumbull 4 (1), was born at 
Grinnell, la., Feb. 5, 1860. 

Horace-Sheridan Riddle 5 (1), eldest son of Francis 4 (1), was born 
in Wabash County, Ind., July 1, 1867. 

Della-Loreiia Riddle 5 (1), eldest daughter of Francis 4 (1), was born 
in Wabash, Ind., Sept. 29, 1868. 

Emery-Morton Riddle 5 (1), second son of Francis 4 (1), was born in 
Washington County, Kan., April 17, 1871 ; died March 9, 1880. 

Anna-Caroline Riddle 5 (2), second daughter of Francis 4 (1), was born 
in Washington County, Kan., Oct. 7, 1872. 

Omar-Ulysses Riddle 5 (1), third son of Francis 4 (1), was born in the 
city of Blue Rapids, Marshall County, Kan., Feb. 26, 1876 ; died March 
26, 1880. 

Lnla-Marion Riddle 5 (1), youngest daughter of Francis 4 (1), was born 
at Wabash, Ind., April 1, 1882. 



Nellie Riddle 5 (2), eldest daughter of Elmer 4 (1), was born at New- 
bury, O., June 14, 1863. 

Emma Riddle 5 ( ), second daughter of Elmer 4 (1), was born at New- 
bury, O., Nov. 14, 1865. 

Frederick-W. Riddle 5 (2), eldest sun of Clarence 4 (1), was born in 
Chardon, O., June 20, 1866. 

Genio Riddle 5 (1), second son of Clarence 4 (1), was born in Clyde, 
O., May 7, 1871. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

Slisail-Lilla Riddle 6 (4), eldest daughter of Herman 5 (1), was born 
at Chapin, 111., June 13, 1877. 

Irene Riddle 6 (1), second daughter of Herman 5 (1), was born at 
Chapin, 111., July 20, 1878. 



RIDDLES OF ALEXANDER, NEW YORK. 

[Connecticut Bkanch.] 

Dr. Lyman Riddle 1 (1) moved from somewhere in the State of Con- 
necticut to Alexander, Genesee County, N. Y., and thence to Michigan, 
about 1834-5. He was a surgeon in the United States army. Place of 
nativity unknown. Died in 1844, leaving issue. It seems quite probable 
that this family is connected with the"Riddells of Monson, Massachu- 
setts," some of whom were settled in Alexander, N. Y., and had children 
named Lyman, but the connection is not known. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Charles-Chaffee Riddle 2 (1), a son of Lyman 1 (1), was born in Alex- 
ander, N. Y., about 1813; married in 1834, moved to Michigan in 1835, 
and was keeping "Red Tavern" in 1844, when his father died. In 1863 



288 HID DELLS OF SCHENECTADY, NEW YORK. 

he was keeping the post-office and public-house at Boston Centre, N. Y., 
and in 1867 was farming on the plank-road near Buffalo ; sold out that 
year and removed to Galva, 111., where he died in 1873, aged 60 years. 
Wife's maiden-name Fannie Vale. 

Lymail Riddle- ('2), a son of Lyman 1 (1), was born in Alexander, 
Genesee County, N. Y., and is now living at Gowrie, Webster County, 
la. No particulars. He has sisters in the State of New York, but I have 
not found their names and address. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Heiiry-Seymore Riddle 3 (1), a son of Charles' 2 (1), Avas born at Kal- 
amazoo, Mich., and is now (1884) about forty-seven years of age ; mar- 
ried, and has issue, a son and daughter. Mr. Riddle was not much at 
home when young, and knows but little of his ancestors' history. Prob- 
ably living in Chicago, 111 One sister died young ; another lives in St. 
Paul, Minn. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

George-Blirnell Riddle 4 (1), a son of Henry 3 (1), was born in Buf- 
falo, N.Y., Nov. 1, 1858; married, and has one daughter, born in Chicago, 
— where Mr. Riddle resides, — Oct. 8, 1882. He has manifested an inter- 
est in this book, and made- an effort to procure a full genealogy, but his 
relatives did not respond. He says the Riddles are tall and of dark com- 
plexion. 



RIDDELLS OF SCHENECTADY, NEW YORK. 

[Monaghan Branch.] 

Robert Riddell 1 (1), was born in the County of Monaghan, Ireland, 
about 1760 ; married Elizabeth Riddell, who was from the Scottish bor- 
der, and had issue five children, of whom hereafter. He came to New 
York, and died at Ballston. Weaver by trade. He was a connection of 
the several other families from the same County, whose genealogy is 

given in this book. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

John Riddell 2 (1), eldest son of Robert 1 (1), was born in Ireland, 
County Monaghan, Jan. 5, 1786, and came to America in 1701. He mar- 
ried Sally Hall (she was born in Stockbridge, Conn., July 0, 1780, and 
died in Princeton, Monroe County, N. Y., May 15, 1856), and had issue 
nine children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddell was a carpenter by trade. 
Died in Van Buren, Ind., March 6, 1851. 

Hugh Riddell' 2 (1), second son of Robert 1 (1), was born in County 
Monaghan, Ireland, Dec. 6, 1787 ; married to Eleanor Reese, of New York, 
March 25, 1812, and lived at Schenectady; had issue eight children, of 
whom hereafter. He enlisted at Schenectady, N. Y., for five years, March 
17, 1812, under Capt. George Nelson, in the Sixth Regiment, United States 
Infantry. In the fall, while at Greenbush, near Albany, he was transferred 
to Captain McChestney's company in the same regiment ; and in the spring 
of 1813, marched to the western frontier, crossing Niagara River May 27, 
capturing Fort George. He was under Generals Winder and Chandler at 



HlDDELLS OF SCHENECTADY, NEW YORK. 289 

Stony Creek, where both of those officers were taken prisoners ; was in 
the detachment of five hundred men, June 23, 1813, who marched from 
Fort George, under Col. Charles G. Boerstler, to Beaver Dam, to seize 
British stores, in which action the colonel was wounded and captured, 
with all his force; during this action sergeant Riddle was ordered, to as- 
sist in hauling a cannon up a steep bank, and was lifting at the wheels 
when the drag-rope broke, letting the wheel of the cannon run across his 
hip and abdomen, the weight crushing his body, causing a severe hernia. 
He was carried a prisoner to York (now Toronto), where his injuries were 
dressed by a British surgeon. 

After his recovery he was, with two other prisoners, — one having his 
arm in a sling, — put on board a batteau, with a guard of nine men under 
a lieutenant, to be taken to Kingston, and in the night, Riddle finding the 
fellow-prisoners ready to co-operate, planned a rescue, which, by throwing 
the arms overboard, except those retained for their own use, and by sep- 
arately capturing the lieutenant, was completely successful, and the boat 
and prisoners triumphantly landed, July 26, 1813, at Fort George (dis- 
tance sixty miles), where a large number of officers and men assembled to 
congratulate them upon their good fortune. Mr. Riddle was furloughed, 
and returned to his home at Schenectady, where he might be nursed and 
recover from his injuries. It is believed that Mrs. Riddle accompanied 
her husband in the army after their marriage, but how long, and for what 
purpose, is not specified. He died at Schenectady, N. Y., April 1, 1865 ; 
his widow was living in 1876. 

Robert Riddle' 2 (2), third son of Robert 1 (1), was born in County 
Monaghan, Ireland, in 1792 ; married Sarah Harkness, and had issue eight 
children, of whom hereafter. Resided at East Davenport, N. Y. Died 
July 4, 1863, aged about 71 years. He enlisted at Schenectady, N. Y., 
March 9, 1813, for five years, under Capt. John McChestney, in the Sixth 
Regiment, United States Infantry, Colonels Boyd and Brady, and was 
marched to Fort Oswego, N. Y., thence tg Niagara frontier, and stationed 
at Fort Niagara for a while ; thence crossing the river was at the capture 
of Fort George, in Canada. He received a wound at the battle of Beaver 
Dam, Can., in his right ankle, producing necrosis of tibia, and with his 
colonel and all his forces was taken prisoner and carried to Toronto, King- 
ston, Montreal, Quebec, and Halifax. After a captivity of nine months 
he was sent to Salem, Mass., and thence to the hospital at Albany, and 
Sackett's Harbor, N. Y. 

William Riddle 2 (1), fourth son of Robert 1 (1), was born in the 
County Monaghan, Ireland ; married Catherine Conley, in Delaware 
County, N. Y., and had issue, of whom hereafter. He lived in Delhi, 
Delaware County, N. Y.* 

Nancy Riddle 2 (l),a daughter of Robert 1 (1), was born in the County 
Monaghan, Ireland ; was married to James Riddle, of Delaware County, 
N. Y., and had issue, of whom hereafter. She and her husband were not 
relatives. He was a carpenter by trade. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

William Riddell 3 (2), eldest son of John 2 (1), was born at Broadalbin,. 

* James Riddell's address, also his brother Robert's, is Imlay City, Lapeer 
County, Mich. ; John's, son of William 2 , address is Kortright Centre, Delaware 
County, N. Y. ; Newton Riddell, son of Nancy and James, Nortli Kortright, Dela- 
ware County, N. Y. 

19 



290 BID DELLS OF SCHENECTADY, NEW YOJlK. 

Fulton County, N. Y., Aug. 15, 1811 ; married Emma Clark, Feb. 10, 1836, 
in Kingsboro', 3ST. Y., and died at White Pigeon, Mich., Aug. 26, 1847. 
He was a carpenter and builder. He had issue three sons and one daughter, 
of whom hereafter. 

Nancy Riddell 3 (2), eldest daughter of John' 2 (1), was born at Broadal- 
bin, Fulton County, N. Y., Oct. 23, 1813; was married May 2, 1835, to 
Henrv Clark, of Northampton, same County, and died at Kingsboro', Dec. 
2, 1852. 

Sarall-Allll Ridtlell 3 (1), second daughter of John -2 (1), was born in 
Broadalbin, N. Y., May 27, 1816, and died unmarried at Perinton (?), 
Monroe County, Dec. 11, 1853. 

Robert Riddell 3 (3), second son of John' 2 (1), was born at Mayh'eld, 
Fulton County, N. Y., Aug. 28, 1818; married Cynthia Brown (she 
was born in Farmington, Ontario County, N. Y., May 7, 1826) in 1843, 
and has had issue ten children, of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddell lived in 
his native town until nineteen years of age, when he went to Victor, On- 
tario County, where he learned the carpenter trade, at which he worked 
about eighteen years. He removed to Hanover, Jackson County, Mich., 
in 1866, and carried on a farm till 1880, when he removed to Juniata, 
Neb., and owns a farm of one hundred and sixty-eight acres, situated two 
and a half miles from Juniata post-office. 

Betsey Riddell 3 (1), third daughter of John' 2 (1), was born in May- 
field, Fulton County, N. Y., Sept. 4, 1819; was married to A. G. North- 
rop, Oct. 1, 1845, and is now (1883) living with her husband at Henrietta, 
Monroe County. 

JollU-J. Riddell 3 (2), third son of John' 2 (1), was born at Mayh'eld, 
Fulton County, N. Y., Nov. 28, 1822; married Rebecca Scrambling in 
1858, of Victor, Ontario County, and died Dec. 24, 1864, in the latter 
town. Farmer. He had issue, of whom hereafter. 

Mary-Jane Riddell 3 (1), fourth daughter of John 2 (1), was born at 
Mayfield, Fulton County, N. Y., Aug. 22, 1825; was married Oct. 1, 
1845, to Hiram Ladd, and is now living at Victor, Ontario County. 

Frances-Maria Riddell 3 (1), fifth daughter of John' 2 (1), was born 
in Mayfield, Fulton County, N. Y., Feb. 27, 1828; was married Nov. 15, 
1849, to Michael Hagertv, and died in Victor, Ontario County, Aug. 31, 
1854. 

Elizabeth Riddle 3 (1), eldest daughter of Hugh' 2 (1), was born at 
Schenectady, N. Y., May 29, 1813 ; was married to Denis Dorsey, a 
painter, and resides in New York city. 

William Riddle 3 (3), eldest son of Hugh' 2 (1), was born at Schenec- 
tady, N. Y., March 7, 1816 ; farmer ; unmarried. 

Hugh Riddle 3 (2), second son of Hugh' 2 (1), was born at Schenectady, 
N. Y., where he resides, unmarried; farmer. 

Ellen Riddle 3 (1), second daughter of Hugh' 2 (1), was born at Schenec- 
tady, N. Y., March 6, 1821, and died in New York city, in 1860. She 
was a milliner and dress-maker. 

Nancy Riddle 3 (3), third daughter of Hugh' 2 (1), was born at Schenec- 
tady, N. Y., March 28, 1823 ; was married to Benjamin Sheldon, mer- 
chant, and resides in Schenectady. 

Rebecca Riddle 3 (1), fourth daughter of Hugh' 2 (1), was born at 
Schenectady, N. Y., Sept. 15, 1825 ; was married to Henry Hathaway, 
contractor, and resides in her native town. 



ttlDDELLS OF SCHENECTADY, NEW YORK. 291 

Jane Riddle 3 (1), fifth daughter of Hugh' 2 (1), was born at Schenec- 
tady, N. Y., Sept. 18, 1827 ; was married to Thomas Riley, cartman, New 
York city, and has issue. 

John Riddle 3 (3), third son of Hugh 2 (1), was born at Schenectady, 
N. Y., April 8, 1848 (?) ; married Anna Conley, and has issue. Mason. 



Nancy Riddle 3 (4), eldest daughter of Robert 2 (2), was born at East 
Davenport, N. Y., Oct. 1, 1816. 

Eliza Riddle 3 (1), second daughter of Robert' 2 (2), was born at East 
Davenport, N. Y., in 1818 ; was married in 1861, to Lyman Smith, of 
Broom County, and died Feb. 25, 1867. 

Jane Riddle 3 (2), third daughter of Robert 2 (2), was born at East 
Davenport, N. Y., Sept. 22, 1820; was married in 1843, to Robert 
Matthews, and lives at East Davenport. 

James Riddle 3 (1), eldest son of Robert 2 (2), was born at East Daven- 
port, N. Y., May 17, 1822; married Ann Lawyer (or Sawyer) in 1848, 
and lives on a farm in Lapeer County, Mich. 

Abigail Riddle 3 (1), fourth daughter of Robert 2 (2), was born at 
East Davenport, N. Y., July 13, 1824; was married in 1838, to William 
Smith, and lives in Lapeer County, Mich. 

Robert Riddle 3 (4), second son of Robert 2 (2), was born at East 
Davenport, N. Y., March 12, 1828; married in 1856, to Jane Aid rich ; 
farmer in Lapeer County, Mich. 

Mary Riddle 3 (2), fifth daughter of Robert 2 (2), was born at East 
Davenport, 1ST. Y. ; was married in 1836, to Alexander Summerville, and 
died in Lapeer County, Mich., March 9, 1876, aged 42 years, 10 months, 
and 9 days. 

William-K. Riddle 3 (4), youngest son of Rqbert 2 (2), was born at 
East Davenport, N. Y., Aug. 1, 1837; married Emma Sheldon in 1866, 
and had issue five children, of whom hereafter. He is a farmer at East 

Davenport. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Calvin Riddell 4 (1), a son of William 3 (2), was born in New York, 
or Michigan ; married, and has issue. He is now living with his mother 
at McPherson, Kan.; farmer. 

Jerome Riddell 4 (1), second son of William 3 (2), was killed in the 
war of the Rebellion, in 1861. 

Milan Riddell 4 (1) third son of William 3 (2), is married and lives in 
Schuyler, Neb. 

Mary Riddell 4 (3), only daughter of William 3 (2), is married and lives 
near Calvin, McPherson, Kan. 



Mary-J. Riddell 4 (4), eldest daughter of Robert 3 (3), was born in 
Perinton ('?), Monroe County, N. Y., June 10, 1847 ; went to Michigan in 
1866; was married March 2, 1881, to J. W. Taylor, of Jackson, Mich., 
where she resides. 

Alice-O. Riddell 4 (1), second daughter of Robert 3 (3), was born in 
Perinton (?), Monroe County, N. Y., July 6, 1849 ; was married to Robert 
Shaffer, in Hanover, Jackson County, Mich., and died there two years 
after marriage. 

Joa-M. Riddell 4 (1), child of Robert 3 (3), was born at Perinton (?), 
N. Y., July 31, 1853, and lives in Jackson, Mich.; unmarried, 1883. 



292 RIDDLES OF WINCHESTER COUNTY, NEW YORK. 

Ida-Dell Riddell 4 (1), third daughter of Robert 3 (3), was born in 
Perinton (?), N. Y., Nov. 23, 1855, and settled in Michigan in 1866; was 
married May 8, 1873, to James F. Nickman, of Hanover, Jackson County, 
Mich., and lived with him till 1881, when they parted, and she went to 
Chicago, 111., where she lives, 1883. 

Robert-Ray Riddell 4 (5), a son of Robert 8 (3) was born in Perinton ('?), 
X. V., Jan. 4, 1857, and died March 13, 1858. 

Willis-B. Riddell 4 (1), a son of Robert 3 (3), was born in Perinton (?), 
N. Y, Jan. 21, 1859, and died Aug. 18, 1866, and was buried in Horton, 
Jackson County, Mich. 

Paris-J. Riddell 4 (1), a child of Robert 8 (3), was born in Perinton (?), 
N. Y., May 12, 1862, went to Michigan with parents, and remained till 
1880, when he went to Juniata, Neb., and lives with parents. 

Alllia-T. Riddell 4 (1), daughter of Robert 3 (3), was born in Perin- 
ton (?), N. Y., Dec. 7, 1864, and lives at home. 

Carrie Riddell 4 (1), daughter of Robert 3 (3), was born in Hanover, 
Jackson County, Mich., July 6, 1867, and is now (1883) living at home in 
Juniata, Neb. 

Maude-M. Riddell 4 (1), daughter of Robert 3 (3), was born in Hano- 
ver, Jackson County, Mich., Nov. 11, 1872. At home. 

Rachel Riddell 4 (1), a daughter of John 3 (3), was born in Ontario 
County, N. Y. ; was married to George Muskett, and lives in Geneva, 
N. Y. No issue. 

Henry-Murray Riddle 4 (1), eldest son of William 8 (4), was born at 
East Davenport, N. Y., Sept. 7, 1867. 

Mary-AllgUSla Riddle 4 (5), eldest daughter of William 3 (4), was born 
at East Davenport, N. Y., Nov. 22, 1869. 

William Riddle 4 (5), second son of William 3 (4), was born at East 
Davenport, N. Y., Feb. 26, 1872. 

Marion-Edith Riddle 4 (1), second daughter of William 3 (4), was born 
at East Davenport, N. Y., in February, 1874. 

Rertie Riddle 4 (1), third daughter of William 3 (4), was born at Daven- 
port, N. Y., in April, 1876. 



. 



RIDDLES OF WINCHESTER COUNTY, NEW YORK. 

[Scotch-Irish Branch.] 

William Riddle 1 (1), was of Irish descent, born in New Rochellc, 
N. Y., in 1788. His father was an officer in the English navy, and was 
killed in this country during the Revolutionary war ; his name has not 
reached me, but his wife was called " Bettie." The ancestor was said to 
be an "Irish nobleman." Probably this family is connected with other 
branches whose pedigree is found in this book, but I have no proof. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

Hiram Riddle" (1), eldest son of William 1 (1), was born in 1810, and 
is a produce-merchant in New York city. He has had a family of six 
children, of whom hereafter. 



FIDDLES OF ROCHDALE, NEW YORK. 293 

Charles Riddle 2 (1), second son of William 1 (1), was born in New 
York, — probably in Winchester County, — and became an active politi- 
cian. Deceased. 

John Riddle 2 (1), third son of William 1 (1), was born in New York, 
and died at Trenton, N. J. 

Jane Riddle 2 (1), daughter of William 1 (1), was born in New York, 
and in 1873 lived in the metropolis. 

James Riddle 2 (1), fourth son of William 1 (1), was born in New 
York, and is now (1880) about 70 years old. He was in the oil business 
at Freeport, 111., in 1873. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

William Riddle 8 (2), eldest son of Hiram 2 (1), was born in New York, 
and died when two years of age. 

Edwin Riddle 3 (1) second son of Hiram 2 (1), was born in New York, 
and in 1873 was employed in the mailing rooms of the publishing estab- 
lishment of the Christian Union in New York city. 

Elizabeth Riddle 3 (1), eldest daughter of Hiram 2 (1), was born in 
New York about 1842. 

Jane Riddle 3 (2), second daughter of Hiram 2 (1), was born in New 
York in 1844. 

James Riddle 3 (2), third son of Hiram 2 (1), was born in 1846, and in 
1873 was employed by the publishers of the Christian Union, Park Place, 
New York city. 

John Riddle 3 (2), fourth son of Hiram 2 (1), was born in New York 
city, and died when a child. 



RIDDLES OF ROCHDALE, NEW YORK. 

[New Hampshire Branch.] 

David Riddle 1 (1), said to have been born and buried somewhere in 
New Hampshire, cannot be connected with any other family known in 
that State. He had two sons, of whom hereafter. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

David Riddle 2 (2), son of David 1 (1), was born somewhere in New 
Hampshire ; married Martha Little, emigrated to Rochdale, N. Y. (now 
in New York city), and died in 1850, leaving three children, of whom 
hereafter. 

James Riddle 2 (1), second son of David 1 (1), was born in New Hamp- 
shire, went to California, where he was living in 1848. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Capt. William Riddle 3 (1), eldest son of David 2 (2), was born in 
New York city, April 5, 1830, and learned the lithographer's art. He 
entered the Union army in the Twentieth Regiment, Massachusetts In- 
fantry, and lost his right arm at the battle of Ball's Bluff, Oct. 21, 1861 ; 
at this date he was promoted sergeant. He was commissioned second 
lieutenant, Sept. 5, 1862; captain, April 12, 1863, and remained in the 



294 BID DELLS OF SARATOGA COUNTY, NEW YORK. 

service till Oct. 8, 1863. Was commissioned by Abraham Lincoln, Oct. 
24, 1863, as captain Veteran Reserve Corps. Mustered out June 30, 
1866. Unmarried. Was living in Charlestown, Mass., in 1876. 

David-James Riddle 3 (3), second son of David 2 (2), was born in New 
York city, and died young. 

Emily-Frances Riddle 3 (1), daughter of David 2 (2), was born in New- 
York city, Oct. 8, 1834; was married to Charles Halsey, who was killed 
in Kansas. She lives with her brother William, in Charlestown, Mass. 



RIDDELLS OF SARATOGA COUNTY, NEW YORK. 

[Scotch-Ikish Branch]. 

Hugh Riddell 1 (1), parents unknown, was born in the County Ar- 
magh, north of Ireland, about the year 1740; emigrated to America when 
young, and settled in the southern section of the United States. He was 
a relative of other families in and from Armagh, but I fail to find in what 
degree. 

David Riddell 1 (1), brother of the preceding, was born in the County 
Armagh, Ireland, emigrated to Ainerica with his two brothers when a 
young man, and settled somewhere in the Middle States. Where did he 
reside? 

George Riddell 1 (1), brother of the preceding, was born in the County 
Armagh, Ireland ; came with his brothers to the United States when quite 
small, and tarried a while in New Jersey. He removed to Massachusetts, 
thence to Sherburne (?), Chenango County, N. Y. He married Margaret 
Mulligan, and had issue five children, of whom hereafter. He died in 
1818, aged 74 years. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

David Riddell 2 (2), a son of George 1 (1), was born in Chenango 
County, N. Y., in 1764 ; married March 18, 1790, and had issue eleven 
children, of whom hereafter. He settled near the place of his birth ; learned 
the trade of shoe-maker with his brother-in-law, Jonathan Pettit, and re- 
moved to Albany, N. Y. He was called a "minute-man of the Revolu- 
tion." Died in August, 1855, at the age of 91 years. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

George Riddell 3 (2), eldest son of David 2 (2), was born in Wilton, 
Saratoga County, N. Y., in 1791 ; married April 10, 1823, to Lydia Beard, 
and had issue eight children, of whom hereafter. He lived at Porter's 
Corners, N. Y. 

John Riddell 3 (1), second son of David 2 (2), was born in Saratoga 
County, N. Y., July 19, 1793; married, Feb. 12, 1818, to Susan Rowland, 
and had issue one daughter. He died in 1871. 

William Riddell 3 (1), third son of David 2 (2), was born in Saratoga 
County, N. Y., Jan. 24, 1795; married in February, 1826, to Permelia 
Starkweather, and secondly, to Phebe Wood. He has deceased. 

Israel Riddell 3 (1), fourth son of David 2 (2), was born in Saratoga 
County, N. Y., Oct. 2, 1796; married, March 2, 1823, to Maria Rowland, 
and had issue four children, of whom hereafter. Mr. R. has deceased. 



RIDDELLS OF SARATOGA COUNTY, NEW YORK. 295 

Margaret Riddell 3 (1), a daughter of David 2 (2), was born in Sara- 
toga County, N. Y., Oct. 8, 1798; was married Nov. 13, 1830, to James 
Talmagc. 

David Riddell 3 (3), fifth son of David 2 (2), was born in Saratoga 
County, N. Y., Sept. 13, 1818; married Jan. 26, 1825, to Polly Parks, 
and secondly, Oct. 10, 1855, to Almira Loamis. Has issue four children, 
of whom hereafter. Mr. Riddell is a farmer and mason by occupation, 
and resides in Madison County, N. Y. He is a man of more than ordi- 
nary ability and force of character; has filled many positions of trust in 
his town and county, and is widely known and respected. 

Sabrilia Riddell 3 (1), second daughter of David 2 (2), was born in 
Saratoga County, N. Y., Aug. 1, 1802; was married Jan. 21, 1824, to 
David W. Puller, and died Jan. 12, 1872. 

Llicetta Riddell 3 (1), third daughter of David 2 (2), was born in Sar- 
atoga County, N. Y., April 9, 1804 ; was married June 1, 1825, to Joseph 
Banning, and died Dec. 10, 1872. 

Almena Riddell 3 (1), fourth daughter of David 2 (2), was born in Sar- 
atoga County, N. Y., March 30, 1806; was married June 7, 1829, to 
Wheeler J. Crane; living in 1873. 

Almira Riddell 3 (1), fifth daughter of David 2 (2), was born in Sara- 
toga County, N. Y., July 1, 1808 ;~was married April 18, 1830, to Henry 
Isham, and was resident, in 1873, at Ross, Kalamazoo County, Mich. 

Lucy Riddell 3 (1), youngest daughter of David 2 (2), was born in Sar- 
atoga County, N. Y., April 19, 1810 ; was married April 18, 1831, to 
Morris Whitcomb; living in 1873. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Adelia Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of George 3 (2), was born at Por- 
ter's Corners, N. Y., Feb. 16, 1824; was married to William Rodgers, and 
lived, in 1873, at Rexford Flats, in Saratoga County ; had seven children. 

George Riddell 4 (3), eldest son of George 3 (2), was born at Porter's 
Corners, N. Y., Feb. 6, 1826, and died Feb. 9, 1867, unmarried. He was 
in trade in San Francisco, Cal. 

Augustus Riddell 4 (1), second son of George 3 (2), was born at Por- 
ter's Corners, N. Y., July 30, 1828; married ; carries on a steam bakery 
in Milwaukee, Wis. Has issue. 

Anil Riddell 4 (1), second daughter of George 3 (2), was born at Por- 
ter's Corners, N. Y., Oet. 18, 1830; was married to Charles Black mar ; 
resided at Litchfield, Hillsdale County, Mich., and died Sept. 14, 1869. 

John Riddell 4 (2), third son of George 3 (2), was born at Porter's 
Corners, N. Y., Aug. 25, 1834, and died at Milwaukee, Wis., Nov. I, 1864, 
unmarried. 

Caroline Riddell 4 (1), third daughter of George 3 (2), was born at 
Porter's Corners, N. Y., July 29, 1837; was married to Charles Latham, 
and lives near her birthplace. 

Charles Riddell 4 (1), fourth son of George 3 (2), was born at Porter's 
Corners, N. Y., May 3, 1839, and in 1873 was living on a farm at Breck- 
enridge, Mo. 

Edgar Riddell 4 (1), fifth son of George 3 (2), was born at Porter's 
Corners, N. Y., Feb. 24, 1841, and in 1873 was practising as a dentist at 
Chestertown, Warren County ; was married and had issue two children; 
runs a hotel at Lucerne, N. Y., called the "Riddell House." 



296 RIDDELLS OF SARATOGA COUNTY, NEW YORK. 

Oscar Riddell 4 (1), a son of William 3 (1), was born in New York 
State, Dee. 12, 1833 ; married Oct. 30, 1857, to Corlista E. Adams, and in 
1873 had issue five children, of whom hereafter. He was left motherless 
when only a year old ; was placed under the care of his aunt, Mrs. Mar- 
garet Talmage, and carried to Michigan when nine years old, where he 
continued to live till his father removed to that State. He followed 
stock-raising and farming until within a few years (1873), when he became 
station-master on the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railroad, where 
he now is; residence, New Carlisle, St. Joseph County, Ind. 

Permelia Riddell 4 (1), eldest daughter of William 3 (1), was born in 
New York State, Genesee County, Dec. 24, 1826, and died March 5, 1833. 

Amelia Riddell 4 (1), second daughter of William 3 (1), was born at 
Castile, N. Y., April 21, 1830; died March 3, 1833. 



Rev. Mortimer Riddell 4 (1), eldest son of David 3 (3), was born in 
Madison County, N. Y., May 8, 1827 ; married Maria Otis, and had issue 
tico children, of whom hereafter. He commenced business as a book-seller 
in Watertown, N. Y., and was successful ; but at the age of thirty-one 
entered the Theological Seminary at Hamilton, graduated in 1861, and 
settled as a preacher. He became a distinguished professional man ; and 
was considered very able and eloquent as a public speaker, as well as a 
ripe scholar. Was settled at New Brunswick, N. J., and subsequently at 
Ottawa, Kan., where he called together a large and intelligent congrega- 
tion, until death released him from a shepherd's care in 1870. 

Rev. Rudolph-R. Riddell 4 (1), second son of David 3 (3). was born 
in Madison County, N. Y., Feb. 11, 1847 ; married Annie Palmer, a lady 
of his native State. He entered the Union army in 1861 as a drummer- 
boy, then only fifteen years old, and after serving a year was promoted to 
first sersreant for gallant conduct. He continued to rise in the official 
scale until he received a commission as major, for capturing a rebel flag 
at Petersburg}), Ya.; also received a "Medal of Honor" from Congre — . 
He led a forlorn hope at the battle of Petersburg!), for which he was pro- 
moted to brevet-lieutenant-colonel. He was the youngest commissioned 
officer in the Union army, and was wounded four times ; once at Fair Oaks, 
once at Antietam, once at Chancellorsville, and once at Gettysburg. He 
was engaged in thirty-one regular battles, and numerous skirmishes with 
the rebels. On returning to his home in 1865 he commenced business as 
wholesale and retail produce merchant, but was unsuccessful ; entered a 
medical college at Bellevue, X. Y., but gave up that study when about to 
enter practice. He next entered Madison University at Hamilton, grad- 
uated in 1871, and commenced preaching for the Baptist Church at Palm- 
er, Mass. He was subsequently settled at South Berwick, Me. He says. 
"My life was a curiously changeful one till the Lord took me in hand, and 
I became a Christian." His ordination took place Feb. 21, 1872. He 
stands high as a public speaker, and promises to become a very distin- 
guished professional man. He is now (1884) settled at St. Paul, Minn., 
and is a D. D. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

Edgar Riddell 5 (2), eldest son of Edgar 4 (1), was born at Chester- 
town, X. Y.(?), July 2, 1868. 

3Iyrail Riddell 5 (1), second son of Edgar 4 (1), was born at Chester- 
town, N. Y.(?), Aug. 29, 1869. 



RIDDELLS OF SOMERSET COUNTY, NEW JERSEY. 297 

Alice BiddelP (1), eldest daughter of Oscar 4 (1), was born Sept. 12, 
1860, and died Nov. 3, 1861. 

Flora Riddell 5 (1), second daughter of Oscar 4 (1), was horn Dec. 19, 



1861 



lOUl. 

William Riddell 5 (2), eldest son of Oscar 4 (1), was born Nov. 9, 1864. 

Clara Riddell 5 (1), third daughter of Oscar 4 (1), was born Sept. 1, 
1868, and died April 20, 1870. 

Oscar Riddell 5 (2), second son of Oscar 4 (1), was born May 19, 1871, 
probably at New Carlisle, Ind. 

Allen Riddell 5 (1) eldest son of Mortimer 4 (1), was born in Madison 
County, N. Y., July 2, 1859, and in 1873 was with his widowed mother in 
Ottawa, Kan. 

Nellie Riddell 5 (1), eldest daughter of Mortimer 4 (1); no dates. 



RIDDELLS OF SOMERSET COUNTY, NEW JERSEY. 

[Scottish Branch.] 

[There are many reasons for believing that the early Riddells of New 
Jersey, whose genealogy will be herewith given, were descended from the 
ancient family in Roxburghshire, Scotland. Sir Walter Riddell succeeded 
as second baronet of that family in 1636; he married a very pious and 
accomplished woman, Janet Rigg, by whom he had Jive sons who seem to 
have inherited their mother's religious zeal and creed. The eldest son, 
Sir John, succeeded as third baronet in 1669, and being a devoted Cove- 
nanter, refused to take the test-oath in 1683; he was consequently imprisoned 
at Bonjedworth. The Rev. Archibald Riddell, third son of Sir Walter, 
was imprisoned for several years in Scotland (see " Riddells of Granton "), 
and subsequently, in 1684, was banished to New Jersey, where he was 
settled several years contemporary with other members of the Riddell 
family, as will hereafter appear. William Riddell, another son of Sir 
Walter, became head of that branch of the family in Scotland denom- 
inated "of Glen-Riddell," in Dumfrieshire. We have now disposed of 
three of the five sons, and h'nd two of which we have no particulars in 
the pedigree of the baronial family. It was a custom in this branch of the 
Scottish Riddell family to carry forward the names John, William, and 
Wtlter, from generation to generation ; names peculiar to the Riddells 
for centuries, .and we might reasonably look for a Walter with the Wil- 
liam and John* in this family. Was there such a son? It is stated by 
one authority that Sir Walter Riddell had "several sons who suffered 

* " Sir John Riddell, brother of the Rev. Archibald Riddell, cousin to^George 
ScotUwas a passenger in the 'Henry and Francis.' Now Woodrow, in his list of 
passengers on this vessel bound for New Jersey, mentions Rev. Archibald Riddell, 
but does not mention George Scott or Sir John Riddell." This extract purported 
to be taken from a work written by Rev. Archibald Riddell, entitled " The Model of 
the Government of East New Jersey in America," — a work of merit, of which there 
are but few copies' in existence. 



298 BIDDELLS OF S0MEB8ET COUNTY, NEW JERSEY. 

great persecution " for their sincere devotion to the Presbyterian Church ; 
two of these are particularly mentioned in history, and judging from the 
clannish spirit of the old Scottish families, we may believe that all members 
of this noted sept would adhere to that faith so carefully taught by their 
devotedly pious mother. We shall now call the reader's attention to the 
records of New Jersey, of dates contemporary with the settlement and 
residence of Rev. Archibald Riddell in that colony. 

In an account of disbursements by the Proprietors of East New Jersey 
in 1683, it is stated that " Walter Riddell p'd Barclay £1,000. Interest for 
twelve years, £1. 14. 0." This Walter Riddell was one of the proprietors 
to George Willocks, in an indenture made in 1697. He was a prominent 
man in the colony, and his name frequently occurs on the records with 
other early proprietors. He was an educated and accomplished man, and 
had a seal or coat-of-arms with which he stamped colonial documents; im- 
pressions from which, if extant, would undoubtedly prove his connection 
with the Scottish border family. He and Rev. Archibald Riddell lived 
within three miles of each other at one time ; the former at Perth Am- 
boy, and the latter at Woodbridge. Walter Riddell was a member of a 
committee ' ; empowered by the Society, or reputed Company of New 
Jersev, to transact all the affairs of said Society,''' in 1697. He was de- 
ceased in 1743, as his heirs and assignees had a survey of one hundred 
acres of land, "beginning at the Second Mountain," Nov. 30th of that 
year.] 

William Riddell (1) was a member of the " Councel of Proprietors of ye 
Western Division of ye Province of New Jersey," and was summoned 
by Lord Cornbury, Nov. 5, 1703, to show his authority (with his colleagues) 
for purchasing of lands from the Indians. This man's name appears in 
many of the colonial documents, almost always in connection with some 
public duty ; he being, as his official responsibility shows, a person of ability 
and trustworthiness. 

Hugh Riddell was a resident of New Jersey, May 12, 1685, as his 
goods were seized by the Custom-house officer in New York, while com- 
ing from there ; Riddell beat the official most severely, and was fined 
heavily. He presented a petition against the extortionate charges of the 
physicians who attended the wounded man, but the court ordered that 
his goods should not be restored until he paid the medical charges. 

The Riddells of Perth Amboy removed to Somerset County, N. J., in 
1720, • and settled at Roysfield, Boundbrook, and Somerville, where they 
owned extensive lands. In the Proprietors' Records the term " at Rid- 
dle's, 500 acres," appears. 

It would be interesting to know the exact connections of the early gen- 
erations of the Riddells of New Jersey, but no records are known that 
can furnish the proof. From the fact that the names in this family and 
the baronial family of Scotland correspond, with the residence of the 
several Riddells in the same neighborhood, some of whom are known to 
be of the border house of Riddell, of Roxburghshire, at contemporary 
dates, supplemented by the possession of a seal, and the traditions of the 
families, leaves but little doubt that the Riddells of Virginia and Ohio, 
descended from the Boundbrook branch, are derived from an ancestrv 
identified with Scottish history at a very remote period. 

William Riddell" (2), presumed to be a son of Walter Riddell, above 
mentioned, was born about 1696; went to sea when a young man, and was 
never heard from. 



BIDDELLS OF SOMERSET COUNTY, NEW JERSEY. 299 

John Riddell 2 (1), a brother of William 2 (2), was born in New Jer- 
sey (?) about 1698; married Molly, daughter of William Anderson,* and 
settled as farmer on the Raritan River, near New Brunswick, in the north- 
western section of the State. He was probably married twice, as may 
appear from the following extract from the records, which I cannot apply 
to any other member of the New Jersey family: "Lisence of marriage 
on the eleventh day of May, A. D. 1741, was granted by his Excellency, 
Lewis Morris, Esqr., Governor, unto John Riddell, of Princeton, in the 
County of Somersett, merchant, of the one party, and Rachel Stockton, of 
the County aforesaid, widow, of the other party." Mr. Riddell was killed 
by being thrown from his carriage while his horses were running away, in 
1773. He had two children (possibly others), of whom hereafter. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

William Riddle 3 (3), eldest son of John- (1), was born in Bound- 
brook, N. J., Sept. 1, 1751. He left there at the age of eighteen, and 
settled in Fauquier County, Va., where he continued during life. He mar- 
ried Jemima Latham, in March, 1793. Mr. Riddle enlisted in the army of 
the Revolution, Oct. 1, 1775, under Capt. William Picketts, of Fauquier 
County, as drummer in the regiment of Col. Thomas Marshall. He re- 
enlisted under Capt. Turner Marshall, in Colonel Churchill's regiment. 
He was on a tour under Captain Helm and Col. Elias Edmonds; was at 
the siege of York, Va., October, 1781. One tour commenced Nov. 1, 1780, 
and ended May, 1781 ; another tour commenced Sept. 1, 1781, and ended 
in November, 1781, after marching to Williamsburgh and Richmond. He 
died between March 4 and Sept. 4, 1839; his widow died in 1870, aged about 
91 years. It is presumed that Mr. Riddle had a family, and it is quite 
probable, that some of the branches represented in this book, several of 
which were from Virginia, are his descendants ; but in the absence of 
good authority I cannot make connections. 

Molly Riddle 3 (1), only daughter of John 2 (1), was born in New Jer- 
sey; married to Casterline, of New York State, where he died. She 

was the mother of one son and two daughters, some of whose descendants 
are in northern Ohio. She was buried at Boundbrook. 

Col. John Riddle 3 (2), second son of John 2 (1), was born on the banks 
of the Raritan River, in New Jersey, Dec. 4, 1761, and married five wives, 
as follows: First, in 1783, to Phebe Schmocke, of 'New Jersey; she was 
born in 1763, and died in Hamilton County, O., Sept. 9, 1792, leaving 
three children, of whom hereafter.. He married, secondly, July 8, 1794, 
Mary James, who was born 1774, and died in Hamilton County, O., Sept. 
9, 1800, leaving two children, of whom hereafter. He married, thirdly, 
in 1801, Nancy Nutt, of New Jersey, who was born Jan. 17, 1784, and 
died Sept. 10, 1810, leaving four children, of whom hereafter. He mar- 
ried, fourthly, Feb. 23, 1811, Jane Marshall, who was born March 14, 1789, 

* The Andersons, descended from an ancient family in Scotland, went from the 
north of Ireland to Liverpool, Eng., where they acquired wealth by merchandizing ; 
they came to New Jersey about 1750, and their descendants have frequently inter- 
married with the Ridclells and Riddles. William and Martha Anderson had eight 
children, of whom Sarah and Willie died young, the latter on shipboard, and the 
mother, contrary to custom, was allowed to bring his body on shore for burial. 
Hannah was married to Michael Schooley ; Priscilla, to Matthew Cunningham; 
Elizabeth, to William McDowell; Martha, to John Ross; and Peggy, to Alexander 
Kirkpatrick, who, with several others before mentioned, were of Scottish families. 



300 RIDDELLS OF SOMERSET COUNTY, NEW JERSEY. 

and died Jan. 11, 1834, leaving nine children, of whom hereafter. Mr. 
Riddle married Jane Ross, his fifth wife, Sept. 30, 1834; she was born in 
New Jersey, Feb. 25, 1787, and died at Spring Dale, Hamilton County, O., 
Jan. 4, 1859, without issue. 

The subject of this notice was a very remarkable man, — a good type 
of the first Western pioneers. From New Jersey he emigrated to Ohio 
in October, 1790, twelve years before that State was admitted into the 
Union, and located on a tract of land about one mile from the Ohio River, 
on what is now a part of the city of Cincinnati, — a city boasting of nearly 
three hundred thousand inhabitants. At the time of Mr. Riddle's settle- 
ment it was only a small village, known as "Losantville," in the territory 
northwest of the Ohio River, opposite the point where the Licking River 
disembogues into the Ohio, and contained a population of about fifty souls. 
The territory around the old village was thickly timbered with heavy 
oak, walnut, elm, sycamore, and, indeed, all the hard-woods indigenous 
to the soil where forests abound in the West. At that period, and for 
fifteen years afterwards, the Indians were exceedingly troublesome to the 
white settlers ; and in addition to braving the privations and hardships 
of frontier life, usually the lot of pioneers, the early settlers of Ohio had 
to encounter the cunning and craft of the merciless red-man. Volumes 
could be filled with legends and stories of dangers encountered by the 
settlers around Cincinnati, — of rapacity and cruelty of the Indians, — of 
bloody fights and midnight massacres, — of startling and hair-breadth es- 
capes; but only two will be submitted, in which our subject took an ac- 
tive part. 

In the spring of 1791, on the 21st of May, John Riddle (or Riddell), 
William Harris (a relative), Joseph Cutter, and Benjamin Van Cleve, 
were out clearing a four-acre lot, — near where the Cincinnati Hospital 
now stands, — preparing to sow wheat upon it. Van Cleve, as was his 
custom, came without his rifle. Mr. Riddle had frequently remonstrated 
with him relative to his imprudence, but being a large, powerful, very 
active and fearless man, his reply invariably was that "no red-skin's 
bullet could catch him." The four men had sat down at the roots 
of a large tree to rest and lunch about noonday, and while thus en- 
gaged noticed that the jay-birds were unusually noisy, and hearing 
a slight rustling in the spice-wood bushes, Riddle remarked that he 
believed some Indians were near. The others laughed at him, but 
having a small dog with them, it was urged on in the direction of the 
noise, and bounded fiercely into the bushes ; but soon returned, manifest- 
ing every canine symptom of fear. Van Cleve at once started for the 
corner of the lot in a path leading toward the village, and although sev- 
eral shots were fired at him by the Indians, lie escaped unhurt. The others 
took a circuitous route through the bushes, as each thought best. Cutter 
was captured, carried off, and never afterwards heard from. A moment 
after Mr. Riddle had struck the path leading to the village, he remem- 
bered that he had left behind a fine four-gallon keg. Determined, to use 
his own words, "not to let the rascally red-skins have that," he hastened 
back to secure it, and thrusting his thumb into the bung-hole, he looked 
and saw the Indians on the full jump toward him; but he was then young 
and fleet of foot, and reaching his horse, mounted and returned to his 
home in safety. 

On the first of June following, Riddle, Van Cleve, and Harris, while 
working near the same place, were again attacked by Indians. Van Cleve 



RIDDELLS OF SOMERSET COUNTY, NEW JERSEY. 301 

had no rifle, and Riddle and Harris defended him and themselves as best 
they could; they fought from behind trees, and killed more than one of 
the Indians, but being outnumbered, and Riddle slightly wounded, all 
three took to flight. Van Cleve being very fleet of foot, was, when more 
than three hundred yards ahead of his companions, intercepted at a fallen 
tree-top by a savage in ambush, and stabbed. The Indian, seeing the white 
men approaching with guns, escaped to his party in the rear. They found 
Van Cleve lifeless, and leaving him, Riddle and Harris reached the village 
in safety, although closely pursued. 

For many years during the early history of Cincinnati, the settlers were 
compelled to organize for self-defense and protection, — to work together 
or near each other, and, indeed, to worship God standing under arms; "for 
the Indians were constantly skulking around them, murdering the settlers 
and robbing their fields and stables." 

In all these defensive operations, John Riddle took an active part, and 
for this he was well fitted by his experience as a soldier and sailor during 
the Revolutionary war. He entered the army in the month of April, 
1778, at Elizabethtown, N. J., under Colonel (afterwards General) Freling- 
huysen, in Capt. William Logan's company, with whom he served in the 
American States army nearly four years, participating in nearly all the bat- 
tles fought during that period. 

In the year 1782 it seems he left the army to go into the privateering 
service, a very powerful and useful adjunct of the army, inasmuch as our 
young government had no navy; and of Mr. Riddle's services and adven- 
tures as a privateersman we will let him speak for himself from an old 
memoir found among his papers : — 

"After I left the army, in 1782, I entered the privateering service un- 
der Captain Hiller, a good seaman and a brave, patriotic man, and sailed 
for New Brunswick on a cruise, hovering along the coast of New York 
and New Jersey as far as Cape May. The first vessel we captured was a 
British war-sloop carrying two guns. We boarded her in the night, with- 
out loss of life, destroyed her guns and ammunition, and then ransomed 
her for four hundred dollars. Elated with our success, later on the same 
night we boarded and captured a sixteen-gun frigate, — ten eighteen- 
pounders and six sixteen-pounders, — in the midst of the British fleet, 
and after passing their guard-ships, ran her aground on a sand-bar. 

" At early dawn next morning we took from this vessel fifty American 
prisoners-of-war, and after liberating them, made the crew prisoners. We 
removed from her all the stores and valuables we could find, including a 
large amount of ammunition, then set fire to her magazine, and blew her 
up. This vessel was a double-decker, fitted out for a long cruise to harass 
our trading-vessels. We learned from the prisoners that one hundred men 
were to have been added to her crew the day after her capture. 

"About one month afterwards, the captain and fourteen men who had 
volunteered our services, took a whale-boat, sailed up the narrows into 
New York harbor, then occupied by the British fleet, boarded a British 
trading-schooner, and having ransomed her for four hundred dollars, re-